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Top List of Reasons People Go To the Doctor

Dana Sparks

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A new Mayo Clinic Proceedings study shows people most often visit health care providers because of skin issues, joint disorders and back pain .   

doctor visit reasons

Jennifer St. Sauver, Ph.D. , says, "Much research already has focused on chronic conditions, which account for the majority of health care utilization and costs in middle-aged and older adults. We were interested in finding out about other types of conditions that may affect large segments of the population across all age groups." Dr. St. Sauver is the primary author of the study and a member of the Population Health Program within the Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery .

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The graphic and b-roll from the Rochester Epidemiology Project, plus sound bites with Dr. St. Sauver are available in the downloads below

Expert title for broadcast cg: Dr. Jennifer St. Sauver, Mayo Clinic Epidemiologist

  • Mayo Clinic: Skin Problems, Joint Disorders Top List of Reasons People Visit Doctors Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify Enzyme Involved in Deadly Brain Tumors

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  • v.64(11); 2018 Nov

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What are the most common conditions in primary care?

Les problèmes de santé les plus fréquents dans les soins primaires.

To identify the most commonly presenting conditions in primary care globally, and to compare common reasons for visits (RFVs) as reported by clinicians and patients, as well as among countries of different economic classifications.

Data sources

Twelve scientific databases were searched up to January 2016, and a dual independent review was performed to select primary care studies.

Study selection

Studies were included if they contained 20 000 visits or more (or equivalent volume by patient-clinician interactions) and listed 10 or more RFVs. Dual independent data extraction of study characteristics and RFV rankings was performed. Data analysis was descriptive, with pooled rankings of RFVs across studies.

Eighteen studies met inclusion criteria (median 250 000 patients or 83 161 visits). Data were from 12 countries across 5 continents. The 10 most common clinician-reported RFVs were upper respiratory tract infection, hypertension, routine health maintenance, arthritis, diabetes, depression or anxiety, pneumonia, acute otitis media, back pain, and dermatitis. The 10 most common patient-reported RFVs were symptomatic conditions including cough, back pain, abdominal symptoms, pharyngitis, dermatitis, fever, headache, leg symptoms, unspecified respiratory concerns, and fatigue. Globally, upper respiratory tract infection and hypertension were the most common clinician-reported RFVs. In developed countries the next most common RFVs were depression or anxiety and back pain, and in developing countries they were pneumonia and tuberculosis. There was a paucity of available data, particularly from developing countries.

There are differences between clinician-reported and patient-reported RFVs to primary care, as well as between developed and developing countries. The results of our review are useful for the development of primary care guidelines, the allocation of resources, and the design of training programs and curricula.

Résumé

Déterminer l’ensemble des raisons de consulter (RDC) les plus fréquentes dans les cliniques de soins primaires et comparer celles que mentionnent les médecins et les patients ainsi que celles qu’on rencontre dans des pays de différentes classifications économiques.

Source des données

On a consulté 12 bases de données scientifiques jusqu’en janvier 2016, pour ensuite effectuer une revue indépendante double afin de retenir les études qui portaient sur les soins primaires.

Choix des études

Pour être retenues, les études devaient contenir au moins 20 000 visites (ou un nombre équivalent d’interactions patient-médecin) et mentionner au moins les 10 RDC les plus fréquentes. On a effectué une extraction indépendante double des données sur les caractéristiques des études et sur le classement des RDC les plus fréquentes. L’analyse des données était descriptive avec une mise en commun des classements des RDC les plus fréquentes dans les diverses études.

Synthèse

Dix-huit études (avec une médiane de 250 000 patients ou de 83 161 visites) respectaient les critères d’inclusion. Les données provenaient de 12 pays répartis sur 5 continents. Les RDC les plus fréquentes rapportées par les médecins étaient les infections des voies respiratoires supérieures, l’hypertension, les examens de santé périodiques, l’arthrite, le diabète, la dépression ou l’anxiété, la pneumonie, l’otite moyenne aigue, le mal de dos et les dermatites. Les RDC les plus fréquemment rapportées par les patients étaient des entités symptomatiques comme la toux, le mal de dos, des symptômes abdominaux, les pharyngites, les dermatites, la fièvre, les céphalées, les symptômes des membres inférieurs, des inconforts respiratoires mal définis et de la fatigue. Dans l’ensemble, les infections des voies respiratoires supérieures et l’hypertension étaient les RDC les plus fréquentes selon les médecins. Dans les pays développés, les RDC qui occupaient les prochains rangs étaient la dépression ou l’anxiété et le mal de dos, tandis que dans les pays en développement, c’était la pneumonie et la tuberculose. Il y avait très peu de données disponibles, en particulier dans les pays en voie de développement.

Il y a des différences entre ce que rapportent les médecins et les patients sur les raisons de consulter un service de soins primaires, mais aussi entre ce qu’on observe dans les pays développés et dans les pays en voie de développement. Les résultats de la présente revue devraient permettre l’élaboration de directives pour les soins primaires, l’allocation de ressources appropriées, et l’instauration de programmes de formation et de curricula spécifiques.

Primary care is an important point of access to health care systems. 1 – 3 Primary care also provides care for the greatest variety of patients and complexity of illness. 4 Primary care infrastructure is positively associated with better health outcomes 5 , 6 and reduced health care costs. 7 However, it has been estimated that a primary care clinician with an average practice would need 18 hours per day to provide guideline-based care for chronic disease and preventive care alone. 8 , 9 Furthermore, the workload of primary care continues to increase. 10 Given the considerable demands on primary care clinicians, it is essential to understand which conditions present most commonly in primary care settings. This information can assist with planning, allocating resources, determining research priorities, policy making, developing guidelines, and training of primary care professionals. 11

While some studies present the most common reasons for visiting primary care in a particular country or region of a country, 12 , 13 there is currently no systematic review of common conditions in primary care globally. Our primary objective was to systematically identify the reasons unreferred patients visit their primary care practitioners. Our secondary objective was to compare common reasons for visits (RFVs) as reported by clinicians and patients, as well as among countries of differing economic classifications.

This systematic review was performed and reported according to MOOSE (Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines, 14 augmented by the more updated PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). 15

In January 2016 a medical librarian (S.C.) searched databases using both controlled vocabulary (eg, MeSH terms and EMTREE subject headings) and text words describing the concepts of “primary health care” and “reasons for consulting.” Twelve databases were searched with no limits applied. A complete list of databases and details about the search strategy are available at CFPlus . * Google was searched on January 21, 2016, and the first 10 pages were reviewed. References were exported to RefWorks bibliographic management software. Reference lists of included studies were hand searched.

Title or abstract screening and full-text review of articles was performed by 3 independent reviewers (D.S.C., C.R.F., and A.J.L.). Inclusion criteria were as follows: the study setting was general practice or primary care; the study reported a minimum of 10 RFVs; and the study’s population included a minimum 20 000 visits or 5 clinicians over a period of 1 year or more, or 7500 patients over a period of 1 year or more. The rationale for the minimum number of visits was based on a practice with 5 clinicians each seeing 20 patients per day, with 200 working days per year, which would result in 20 000 visits. Equivalencies were determined based on 1500-patient practice panels per physician, which among 5 physicians would result in 7500 patients. Studies were observational in design.

Studies were excluded if they focused on a specific type of visit or presentation (eg, periodic health examination visits), focused on specific conditions or problems (eg, acute conditions only), selected specific populations (eg, adolescents), indicated that visits resulted from referrals (eg, to pediatrics or internal medicine), or were published before 1996. When there were multiple publications using data from the same source or database, priority was given to the most recent data and to complete data sets with the most specific information. Multiple publications using the same source were only included if they analyzed the data differently (eg, subgroup analysis). Disagreement was resolved by consensus or third party review (G.M.A.). Attempts were made to contact authors of studies if additional data were required (eg, unpublished data). Google Translate was used for non-English articles.

Two reviewers extracted data independently (D.S.C., C.R.F.). The reported RFV was the primary outcome of interest. Reasons for visits were defined as the reasons patients presented to primary care or the problems managed by physicians. For each of the top RFVs (up to 20 per study), the number, percent, or rate of visits associated with each condition were recorded. Descriptive characteristics of each study were also collected, including whether the RFV was patient- or clinician-reported, the total number of visits, the number of clinicians or practices sampled, the location and duration of data collection, the percent of female patients, the percent of patients aged 65 and older, and the coding system used (eg, the International Classification of Primary Care, ICD-9, ICD-10).

To assess the risk of bias, 5 characteristics of each study were scored, with 0 indicating high risk of bias and 1 indicating low risk of bias. The characteristics were as follows: representative sample of clinicians (≥ 2 of the following 3: having both male and female clinicians; not limited to specific number of years in practice; and not limited to specific practice size); representative sample of patients (≥ 2 of the following 3: having both male and female patients; mixture of urban and rural settings; and not limited to specific age group); prospective (score = 1) or retrospective (score = 0) data collection; specified coding system (yes = 1, no = 0); and duration of data collection (≥ 1 year = 1, < 1 year = 0). Discrepancies were resolved by consensus or third party review (G.M.A.).

Data were separated into “general” and “specific” reported RFVs. General categories were broad descriptive groupings (eg, respiratory), while specific categories were more exact diagnoses (eg, pneumonia). Within each category (general or specific), a standardized coding scheme was applied. For example, using our coding scheme for specific RFVs, “back complaint,” “dorsopathies,” “back symptoms,” “dorsalgia,” “low back symptoms,” and “neck pain” were all coded as “back pain/spinal pain.” Diagnostic coding legends for the general and specific conditions are available at CFPlus . *

To analyze and pool the most common visits, RFVs from each study were ranked from most to least common. The reporting of frequency of visits for particular RFVs was inconsistent between studies (variably using number of visits, percent of visits, rate of visits, and others). Thus, the rank of each reported RFV was used as our measure of relative frequency. Using the top 20 ranked RFVs in each study, the first most common condition in each study was assigned the number 20, the second was 19, and so on. Therefore, an RFV not in the top 20 in a particular study would be assigned a zero ranking. Rankings were then combined and mean ranks were determined for each RFV. The most commonly seen RFVs were those with the highest mean rank. An RFV was excluded from combining if it was present in only 1 study.

To analyze the secondary outcome, countries were categorized by economic classification as either developed or developing, using the United Nations classification system, 16 and the mean ranks of clinician-reported RFVs were compared. Also, when subgroup analyses from included studies were available (eg, clinician or patient sex, practice setting), data from each study were combined using the same approach (for subgroups with ≥ 2 studies).

We identified 18 studies ( Table 1 ) 11 – 13 , 17 – 31 for inclusion from a total of 3501 original articles retrieved in our search ( Figure 1 ). (National Center for Health Statistics data were also reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Akintunde Akinseye, personal communication, April 2017].) Agreement was 99% for study selection and 95% for data extraction.

Study characteristics

NA—not available, Neth—the Netherlands, NZ—New Zealand, OA—overall, SG—subgroup, USA—United States of America.

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 832fig1.jpg

Study flow diagram

Included articles represented 12 countries: Australia, England and Wales, India, Ireland, Malta, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Serbia, South Africa, Sweden, and the United States. Seven studies provided the size of the included population, ranging from 9896 to 2 780 270 (median was 250 000). Sixteen studies provided the total number of included visits, ranging from 4383 to 3 810 843 (median was 83 161) ( Table 1 ). 11 – 13 , 17 – 31 Overall, the risk of bias was low, with 72% (13 of 18) of articles scoring at least 4 out of 5 on our assessment. Further details regarding the characteristics and quality assessment of included studies are available at CFPlus . *

Of the 18 included studies, 6 reported general categories of RFVs. 11 , 18 , 21 , 22 , 24 , 30 Three of these studies 11 , 18 , 21 also reported specific RFVs, as did an additional 7 studies. 12 , 13 , 19 , 23 , 25 , 29 , 31 The remaining 5 studies 17 , 20 , 26 – 28 could not be included in either the general or specific analysis but were kept in the review, as they provided additional subgroups for analysis.

Six studies were analyzed for general categories of RFVs in primary care. 11 , 18 , 21 , 22 , 24 , 30 The most common categories of RFVs in descending order were respiratory, nervous system or sense organs, cardiovascular or circulatory, skin or subcutaneous, and musculoskeletal conditions. The proportion of RFVs and problems managed are further described at CFPlus . * Each of these categories was included in the top 20 reported RFVs in all 6 included studies, providing high consistency with the ranking.

Fourteen RFV lists from 10 studies were analyzed for specific RFVs to primary care. 11 – 13 , 18 , 19 , 21 , 23 , 25 , 29 , 31 Nine RFV lists were “clinician-reported” and 5 were “patient-reported.” Two studies reported data from both clinicians and patients. 12 , 21 One study provided data from 3 countries, which were analyzed as distinct sets of data. 31 Table 2 11 – 13 , 18 , 19 , 21 , 23 , 25 , 29 , 31 provides the most common clinician-reported and patient-reported RFVs. None of the most common clinician-reported RFVs was found in all 9 included studies, but the top 2 (upper respiratory tract infection [URTI] and hypertension [HTN]) were found in 8 studies. Of the top 18 patient-reported RFVs, 10 appeared in all 5 data sets.

Further analysis of clinician-reported RFVs according to country classification showed specific differences ( Table 3 ). 11 – 13 , 18 , 19 , 21 , 23 , 25 , 29 Five studies with information on clinician-reported RFVs were classified as developed countries (Australia, England and Wales, Sweden, and the United States), 11 – 13 , 19 , 25 and 4 studies were classified as developing (India and South Africa). 18 , 21 , 23 , 29 For both developed and developing countries, the top 2 most common reported RFVs were URTI and HTN, consistent with the overall rankings. In developed countries, the third and fourth most common RFVs were depression or anxiety and back pain, neither of which appeared in the developing countries list. In developing countries, the third and fourth most common RFVs were pneumonia and tuberculosis, neither of which appeared in the developed countries list.

Ranking of RFVs presenting to primary care among developed and developing countries

RFV—reason for visit.

Subgroup analyses were provided in 9 studies. 17 , 20 , 22 , 24 , 26 – 30 Subgroups included seasonality, 22 , 26 physician 17 , 20 and patient sex, 19 , 24 , 27 , 30 urban versus rural setting, 28 methods of reimbursement or payment, 22 , 24 and practice setting 18 , 29 ( Table 1 ). 11 – 13 , 17 – 31 The information on methods of reimbursement or payment and practice settings was frequently not well described and inconsistent among studies and, therefore, was not pooled or included. Summaries of the remaining subgroup data are available at CFPlus . *

This review includes primary care visit data from 18 studies with a median of 250 000 patients or 83 161 visits per study. Twelve countries provided data from 5 of 6 populated continents. Data on specific RFVs were robust and provided a number of important results.

The 10 most common clinician-reported RFVs encapsulate the breadth of medical management provided by primary care, including acute, chronic, and preventive care. Policy makers and administrators must balance increasing demand for primary care services with finite resources. For example, while routine health maintenance examinations are the third most common clinician-reported RFV, there is considerable debate as to the merit of these appointments. 32 Researchers and guideline developers can be reminded of priorities in primary care. For example, common RFVs should be reflected in guideline recommendations and associated opportunity costs within primary care. Additionally, training and evaluating clinicians on their clinical abilities should reflect the relative frequency of conditions that they will see in practice. For example, many primary care clinicians report feeling unprepared to manage mental health problems, 33 yet depression or anxiety is the sixth most common clinician-reported RFV.

The 10 most common patient-reported RFVs were dominated by symptomatic conditions with no preventive care or management of asymptomatic chronic conditions. This intuitively makes sense as patients seek help for symptoms, but it might also suggest a difference in clinician and patient care priorities. Regardless, the differences remind us that interpretation of RFV data requires examination of both clinician- and patient-reported data.

When comparing clinician-reported RFVs in developed and developing countries, URTI and HTN are consistently the 2 most common RFVs. However, some highly ranking RFVs in developed countries were absent from developing countries, and vice versa. Notably, depression or anxiety and back pain ranked as third and fourth in developed countries but did not appear in developing countries. This might be owing to a paucity of data from developing countries and thus not reflect reality. Alternatively, clinician-reported RFVs might not reflect the prevalence of conditions if patients do not present for depression or anxiety and back pain, or if clinicians under-reported or recorded these conditions differently. Thus, depression or anxiety and back pain might be more common in developing countries than identified. The World Health Organization estimates that more than 75% of people with mental illness are untreated in developing countries. 34 Furthermore, certain cultures are more likely to report somatic symptoms than emotional symptoms, affecting how mental illness presents and is diagnosed by clinicians. 35 Back pain is also likely underrepresented in these studies, as 1-month prevalence estimates of back pain in South Africa and India are 39%. 36 Additionally, several infectious conditions such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, parasites, and HIV are considerably more prevalent in primary care in developing nations, which was reflected in our results.

Limitations

The use of different coding systems (ie, the International Classification of Primary Care, ICD-9, ICD-10, and the Read codes) by each study presented challenges for combining data while retaining adequate detail. Also, studies recorded data with varying levels of specificity, which limited the number of data sets that could be combined. The biggest limit to our study was the paucity of published literature meeting our inclusion criteria; there were notable omissions from Canada, Europe, and South America, and only 2 developing countries provided data.

While examining large-scale studies encompassing 12 countries on 5 continents, we found that globally primary care clinicians manage a range of clinical presentations. Despite a high degree of consistency in the 10 most common RFVs to primary care, we identified important differences in RFVs reported by clinicians or patients. Differences might also exist between developed and developing countries. Our findings demonstrate the need for more large-scale primary care studies and serve as a call for primary care researchers around the globe to investigate common conditions in their regions.

Ranking of RFVs to primary care as reported by clinicians and patients

Editor’s key points

  • ▸ This systematic review of several large-scale studies from 12 countries found that the most common clinician-reported reasons for visits (RFVs) (eg, upper respiratory tract infection, hypertension) encapsulate the breadth of medical management provided by primary care, including acute, chronic, and preventive care. Clinicians’ training should reflect the relative frequency of conditions that they will see in practice; for example, depression or anxiety was the sixth most common clinician-reported RFV, so clinicians should be trained to manage mental health problems.
  • ▸ The most common patient-reported RFVs (eg, cough, back pain, abdominal symptoms) were dominated by symptomatic conditions.
  • ▸ Developed and developing countries shared the 2 most common RFVs: upper respiratory tract infection and hypertension. In developed countries, the third and fourth most common RFVs were depression or anxiety and back pain, neither of which appeared in the developing countries list. In developing countries, the third and fourth most common RFVs were pneumonia and tuberculosis, neither of which appeared in the developed countries list.

* The search strategy, the diagnostic coding legends for general and specific conditions, the characteristics and quality assessment of included studies, the proportion of reasons for visits and problems managed, and summaries of the subgroup data are available at www.cfp.ca . Go to the full text of the article online and click on the CFPlus tab.

Contributors

All authors made substantial contributions to the design of the study, conducting the study, and writing and editing the manuscript.

Competing interests

None declared

This article has been peer reviewed.

Cet article a fait l’objet d’une révision par des pairs.

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Top 10 Reasons Why Patients Come to Primary Care

What brings patients to your office-and not the specialty office down the street? Insights in this slideshow.

Why do patients visit primary care offices? For which conditions are they more likely to visit a surgical or medical specialty office-or a hospital outpatient or emergency department?The CDC’s FastStats on Ambulatory Care Use and Physician Office Visits provides lots of answers in “Selected patient and provider characteristics for ambulatory care visits to physician offices and hospital outpatient and emergency departments: United States, 2009-2010.”The slides that follow offer a closer look at the primary problems that bring patients to your office.

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Top 10 Most Common Reasons to Visit the Doctor and Tips for Prevention

Jun 12, 2017 | Employee Benefits , Wellness

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Having to take time off work to visit the doctor is no one’s idea of fun. Fortunately, there are steps you can take now to improve your health and your family’s health so you can minimize the number of trips you take to the doctor’s office each year. The following is a list of the top reasons people in the United States go to the doctor, according to a study by the Mayo Clinic.

1. Skin Disorders

Skin disorders refer to conditions such as acne, cysts and dermatitis. While skin disorders most often affect patients 18 years and younger, adults can be affected too. In fact, 20 percent of acne cases occur in adulthood.

While the occasional pimple is part of life, there are steps you can take to keep your skin healthy. For instance, avoid touching your face throughout the day and make sure to take a shower after exercising to keep pores clean. Use fragrance-free soaps and cleansers and make sure you keep your skin from getting too dry.

2. Joint Pain and Osteoarthritis

One-third of Americans report having joint pain. Joint pain can be caused by various conditions including osteoarthritis—the most common form of arthritis in the United States—and often worsens with age. While osteoarthritis can affect any joint in your body, it most frequently affects the joints in your knees, hips, hands and spine.

Staying active, eating well and maintaining a healthy weight are all key to maintaining joint function. When exercising, try to mix in low-impact exercises like the elliptical machine and swimming, since high-impact exercises like running can lead to joint pain. If you feel pain, ice the affected area to minimize tissue swelling and allow your body time to rest.

3. Back Problems

Back problems plague millions of America each year, and are one of the leading causes of disability. The pain may be a dull ache, shooting pain or a burning sensation. Treatment for back pain varies based on the type of injury and the nerves or joints affected.

One of the best ways to prevent back injuries is to have good posture. Good posture allows your muscles and ligaments to work properly and decreases your risk of injury. If your job involves sitting at a computer, avoid slouching forward and put your computer at eye level to avoid straining your neck by constantly looking down. Maintaining a healthy weight and exercising regularly, especially your core muscles, can improve spine health.

4. Cholesterol Problems

High cholesterol more than doubles your chances of developing heart disease—the leading cause of death for adults in the United States. Cholesterol is a waxy substance found in fats in your blood, which your body needs to function. Having too much cholesterol, though, causes walls to build up in your arteries, making it difficult for blood to circulate.

Keep cholesterol levels in check by eating a well-balanced diet that is high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fish, and by limiting red meat and sugar. Being active and avoiding tobacco can also help promote heart health. Scheduling preventive care visits and following screening recommendations from your doctor can help catch cholesterol issues before they become severe.

5. Upper Respiratory Problems (not including asthma)

Upper respiratory problems can occur at any time, but are most common in winter and fall. The upper respiratory system includes the nose, sinuses and throat. Symptoms often include congestion, facial pain or pressure, a runny or stuffy nose, a cough and a sore throat.

Keep your immune system healthy by washing your hands frequently, not sharing food and drinks with others, and not smoking. If your home is dry, use a humidifier to help you breathe easier. Also, sneezing or coughing into the bend of your elbow can help stop the spread of germs.

6. Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder and Depression

Mental health disorders like anxiety, bipolar disorder and depression affect millions of Americans each year. Mental health disorders can be difficult to treat and are frequent reasons for doctor’s visits.

While genetics and the environment play a role in the development of certain mental health disorders, effectively managing stress and getting frequent, mild exercise can help promote good mental health. If you or someone you know is struggling with anxiety or depression, talk about how you are feeling with someone you trust. Do not be ashamed to get help.

7. Chronic Neurology Disorders

Neurological disorders are diseases of the brain, spine and the nerves that connect them. There are hundreds of neurological diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy.

While many neurological diseases are not preventable, there are steps you can take now to promote overall brain health, which may help slow or delay the progression of certain neurological disorders. For instance, keeping your brain active by completing puzzles, word games or reading can be beneficial. In addition, eating a healthy diet, staying socially active, exercising frequently and getting enough sleep can help keep your mind sharp.

8. High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, also referred to as hypertension, is a chronic medical condition in which artery walls are exposed to constant, steady pressure causing the heart’s muscles to weaken. Hypertension can lead to heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure, and it also increases one’s risk for developing blood clots.

High blood pressure can be avoided by eating a heart-healthy diet consisting of fruits, vegetables, nuts and fish. Being active, abstaining from tobacco and maintaining a healthy weight can also help promote heart health.

9. Headaches and Migraines

Headaches refer to pain in any region of the head. Migraines are a type of headache that causes recurrent, throbbing pain which usually occurs on one side of the head. It can last for hours or days and can sometimes cause nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light and sound.

Although much is still unknown about the causes of headaches and migraines, some common triggers include stress, sensory stimuli (bright lights, loud sounds, etc.), weather changes and alcohol (especially wine). Certain foods like aged cheeses and food additivities like aspartame have also been identified as potential triggers. In addition, maintaining a consistent sleep schedule, getting regular exercise and limiting stress can reduce the frequency and severity of headaches and migraines.

10. Diabetes

Approximately 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, and the rate of new cases continues to grow each year. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to heart disease, strokes, amputations and kidney disease.

While type 1 diabetes can’t be prevented, type 2 diabetes can be avoided by exercising regularly and eating nutritiously. Maintaining a healthy weight is the biggest thing you can do to prevent type 2 diabetes. If you already have diabetes, it is important that you are vigilant in monitoring your blood sugar so complications do not arise.

What You Can Do

While environmental and genetic factors play a factor in the development of diseases, living a healthy lifestyle now can improve your well-being for years to come. Plus, good primary care can help keep any health issues from progressing. If you haven’t already, check to see if your company has an on-site clinic option for primary care and take advantage if it is available to you.

Click here for more information about on-site clinics.

This information is abstracted from Zywave’s “Live Well, Work Well: Top 10 Most Common Reasons for Going to the Doctor”  article.

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10 Reasons Why You Need a Primary Care Doctor

Female doctor talking to male patient.jpg

93.9% percent of children in the United States have contact with a health care provider annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) . That percentage drops to 82.1 percent of adults in the United States who had contact with a health care provider in the last year. Why do fewer adults visit their doctors, and why are these annual visits so necessary? The following 10 reasons outline the importance of having a primary care doctor. 

1. Holistic Health Care

Where should you go if you develop a cough, if you’re feeling anxious and depressed, or if you are curious about a certain vaccine? The answer: your primary care doctor! Your primary care doctor focuses on holistic health care, meaning he or she is trained in treating a little bit of everything and coordinates patient health care in one central location. With a primary care doctor, you only need to make one appointment to discuss a variety of health issues you might be experiencing, whether they are physical, emotional or mental.

2. Better Manage Chronic Diseases

Chronic health conditions like diabetes, arthritis and lupus are often difficult to monitor by yourself. A primary care doctor can help you stay organized and aware of how your chronic disease is affecting your body. Scheduling regular visits and performing routine tests are two ways your doctor can help you better maintain your chronic disease.

3. Higher Level of Comfort

Most people don’t love talking to strangers, especially about their health care needs and concerns. Choosing a primary care doctor you trust is the first step. The next step is scheduling regular appointments with your doctor so that you can discuss your concerns and overall health. In addition, researchers at the Journal of Health Affairs found that patients with primary care doctors reported higher levels of satisfaction than patients without primary care doctors. The more you visit a doctor you trust, the better your relationship with him or her and the better your care.

4. Transparency of Entire Health History

Routine visits with your primary care provider not only help with your comfort level, but they also build on your health history. Knowledge of your health history, as well as your family health history, is imperative for prevention of diseases and also helps your doctor catch early symptoms of serious conditions.

5. Lower Overall Health Costs

Attending regular appointments with your primary doctor might seem tedious and like a waste of money at times, but research from the Journal of Health Affairs suggests that routine appointments with a primary care doctor cut overall health costs for patients. Regular screenings, open communication between you and your doctor, and a record of your health history all contribute to an overall lower cost of health care.

6. Routine Screenings

Taking your blood pressure at every appointment might seem like a task, but screenings like these hold great importance when it comes to your health. Undergoing testing on a regular basis helps catch symptoms before they get worse or lead to debilitating health issues.

7. Catch Health Issues Early

While routine screenings may find certain symptoms of health issues before they become larger problems, your primary care doctor also knows you well enough to ask the right questions and detect other health issues in their early stages.

8. Referrals to Other Medical Specialists

Do you need a referral to see an ENT or a cardiologist? Start with an appointment with your primary care doctor. Chances are your doctor has helpful recommendations for specialists since he or she is familiar with how you prefer to participate in your health care.

9. Decrease in Hospital and ER Visits

Research shows that patients who regularly visit their primary care physicians have fewer hospitalizations and emergency visits than those who do not utilize primary care doctors. Waiting too long to see a doctor or ignoring symptoms can lead to a hospitalization or an ER visit, two of the most expensive and overwhelming outcomes for patients.

10. Better Patient-provider Communication

Communication is a two-way street, especially when it comes to your health. Communicating your health wants, needs and concerns are crucial for your doctor to address your health appropriately. Likewise, your primary care doctor should also feel comfortable holding honest conversations with you regarding their concerns and thoughts regarding your health.

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Are you or a loved one looking for a primary care doctor? Look no further than our find a doctor  tool. Search by a doctor’s name or location to find the best fit for you!

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Mayo Clinic IDs the top 10 reasons for doctors' visits

Skin ailments, joint disorders, and back pain—not life-threatening conditions—are the most common reasons for visits to U.S. health care providers, according to a new Mayo Clinic Proceedings study .

For the study, Mayo Clinic researchers used data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project—a comprehensive medical records linkage system—to categorize the medical diagnoses of Olmsted County, Minn., residents who had visited the Mayo Clinic, the Olmstead Medical Center , and the Rochester Family Medicine Clinic between January 2005 and December 2009. They found that the 10 most common diagnoses were:

  • Skin disorders;
  • Osteoarthritis and joint disorders;
  • Back problems;
  • Cholesterol problems;
  • Upper respiratory conditions, excluding asthma;
  • Anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder;
  • Chronic neurologic disorders;
  • High blood pressure;
  • Headaches and migraines; and

"Much research already has focused on chronic conditions, which account for the majority of health care utilization and costs in middle-aged and older adults," says lead study author Jennifer St. Sauver, adding, "Surprisingly, the most prevalent non-acute conditions in our community were not chronic conditions related to aging, such as diabetes and heart disease, but rather conditions that affect both genders and all age groups."

For instance, nearly half the study population suffered from a skin disorder—such as acne, cysts, or dermatitis—in the five-year period (Perry, Minneapolis Post , 1/17; Mayo Clinic release , 1/16).

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Posted on January 22, 2013

Updated on March 17, 2023

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Getting the most out of your doctor appointment.

Last Updated March 2023 | This article was created by familydoctor.org editorial staff and reviewed by Kyle Bradford Jones, MD, FAAFP

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Taking an active role in your health care can help you get the best care possible from your doctor. One way to do this is to make sure you get the most out of your office visit by preparing ahead of time and creating an agenda for your visit with your doctor. When you prepare for your appointment ahead of time, both you and your doctor will find the visit more helpful. Here are some tips you can follow for what to do before, during, and after your visit with your doctor. These tips can help you and your doctor work together to improve your health.

Path to improved health

Be prepared.

Usually, you will only have about 15 minutes of time with your doctor. To make sure you and your doctor get the most out of your time, be sure to think about your visit ahead of time.  Think about your concerns and questions. Write these things down before your visit. Make a list and bring it to your visit. With a list, you won’t have to worry about remembering everything you need to tell your doctor. Here are a few things you might consider before your visit:

  • Think about concerns and questions you have for your family doctor. Write these down. Start first with what is most important to you and end with the least important. Bring the list to your visit. Be ready to work with your doctor to reorder your list, if needed.
  • If you are a new patient, bring as much information as possible with you to help your new doctor learn your health history. If you are not a new patient, you only need to bring information with you that is new or has changed since your last visit with your doctor.
  • Write down your health history. You can create a “health journal” for yourself on paper or on your computer. Your health journal can include things like health problems you have or have had, blood pressure numbers, recent symptoms, food eaten, or a sleep diary. Bring the journal or health history to your appointments.
  • Take any X-rays, test results, or medical records you have. Your doctor can look at these to learn more about your health history.
  • Make a list of all the medicines you take, including when and how often you take the medicine. Include the strength of the medicine (for example, do you take 150 mg or 200 mg?). The list should also include any vitamins or supplements you take.
  • Talk to your family members to see if they can come with you to your appointment to listen, take notes, and ask questions.
  • If you will need an interpreter for your appointment, call your doctor’s office to let them know ahead of time.

Be sure to take your lists with you to your visit. The  Today’s Visit Form  or  Patient Pre-Visit Checklist  can help you with preparing for your visit with your doctor.

Talk to your doctor

When you talk to your doctor, follow these steps to make sure you and your doctor get the most out of your time together.

Go over your lists

Even though it’s hard, talk about the issues that are embarrassing or scary at the beginning of your visit. This will give your doctor plenty of time to address them. Your doctor is not there to judge you but to help you. Be honest.

Be sure to tell your doctor about any current and past health care issues or concerns. It’s important to share any information you can, even if you’re embarrassed. Give your doctor the following information during the exam:

  • Your symptoms
  • Personal information, such as stress or changes in your life
  • Any medicines you are taking, including supplements
  • Any side effects you are experiencing from your medicine(s). Be sure to tell your doctor if your medicine makes you feel sick or if you think you may be allergic to it. Also let them know if you are having trouble paying for your medicine. Your family doctor may be able to help find different medicines for you to take or explain why the ones you are taking are the right choice.

Ask questions

Don’t be afraid to speak up during your appointment. It’s important for you to let your doctor know if you don’t understand something. If you don’t ask questions, your doctor will think you understand everything. Here are some tips on asking your doctor questions:

  • Ask every time you don’t understand something.
  • If you can’t understand what your doctor is explaining, ask them to explain it in better detail, possibly using pictures or brochures.

Here are some good starter questions you can ask your doctor:

  • What do my symptoms mean?
  • Should I be tested for a disease or condition?
  • What caused this condition?
  • How serious is the condition?
  • How is it treated?
  • Are there any side effects to the treatment?
  • How long will treatment take?
  • How will this condition affect my life now and in the future?

If you run out of time, make a plan to get the rest of your questions answered.

  • Tell your doctor when you need more time to talk about something. If the doctor isn’t available to help, you should be able to talk to an assistant or a nurse. If no one else is available, see if you can schedule another appointment to ask the rest of your questions.

Take information home with you

Taking written or recorded information home with you can be helpful. It can help you remember information and instructions any time you need to. Your doctor is a good source of accurate information you can trust. The following are types of information you can take home with you:

  • Notes you have taken during the appointment. It’s ok for you to write down the information your doctor gives you. Sometimes it helps to bring a friend or family member with you. They can help write down the answers to your questions and other information shared by the doctor or nurse. You can also ask your doctor to write down notes for you.
  • Written instructions from your doctor. These should be provided to you at the end of your appointment.
  • A tape recording. Ask your doctor if it’s okay for you to record to the appointment to help you correctly remember everything.
  • Brochures or other educational materials. If there aren’t any available, ask where or how you can get some.

Things to consider

Make sure to follow any instructions you and your doctor discussed during the visit. This could include taking medicine, preparing for a test, or scheduling an appointment with a specialist. If you’re confused or if you’ve forgotten some information, it’s okay to contact your doctor. The following are some common reasons you may need to call your doctor or send an electronic message after your appointment:

  • If you have any questions after the appointment. Ask to leave a message with the doctor or speak with a nurse.
  • If you start to feel worse or have problems with your medicine
  • If you had tests and haven’t got the results

National Institute of Health, MedlinePlus: Make the most of your doctor visit

Last Updated: March 10, 2023

This article was contributed by familydoctor.org editorial staff.

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This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.

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Top 6 reasons to visit the doctor (even if you're not sick!)

doctor visit reasons

Most people view going to the doctor as a hassle. Work is crazy enough, and the last thing you want to do is give up the little free time you have to go to a doctor’s office. Here’s the thing: if you wait until you’re already sick for that doctor visit, you may end up spending more time and money on healthcare than you could have if you’d kept things in check. (Kinda like what would happen if you never got the oil checked in your car.)

We look at a few reasons why you should see your primary care doc, even if you’re not sick. ‍

Relationship-building

1. Relationship-building with your primary care physician

Another great reason to get in touch with your doctor is to make sure there aren’t any hazardous medical conditions looming and unchecked. It’s especially important to check in with your doctor if your family has a history of high cholesterol, heart disease, hypertension, cancer, or other chronic and serious conditions. This is preventative care at its best — making sure you have no risk factors or family history that could put you at greater risk for health issues. Your primary care doctor will also make sure you’re keeping up with vaccines and routine screenings such as mammograms or colorectal cancer screenings. Health prevention is critical for long-term health and well-being.

Identify any health risks

2. Identify any health risks

Another great reason to get in touch with your doctor is to make sure there aren’t any hazardous health risks looming unchecked. It’s especially important to check in with your doctor if your family has a history of high cholesterol, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, or other chronic and serious conditions. Family history could put you at risk, too, and you don’t want to wait to find out. Visiting with your doctor can identify any risks and also help you put together a plan to lower your risk and determine any additional tests you may need.

Keep your body balanced

3. Keep your body balanced

The body is a complex machine that consists of many interconnected systems that keep it running. Just like an engine (here’s the car analogy again), the body needs to be checked from time to time to make sure all systems are running as expected. Things like weight, blood pressure, cholesterol, and other vitals and markers should be tracked and monitored over time. Often this includes a simple blood test to help signal if something is wrong or out of balance. And if something isn’t right, best that it’s caught early.

Healthy mind matters

4. Healthy mind matters

In addition to keeping your physical body in check, it’s important to keep tabs on your mental state, too. You may be at risk for depression and may not even know it. It’s not something to be ashamed of, nearly one of every ten adults suffers from depression or an anxiety disorder. These health conditions can be difficult to diagnose on our own, yet routine screenings with your PCP can detect any warning signs to keep your mental health in check before more serious problems arise.

For prevention

5. It’s better for the wallet

Let’s do a price comparison. According to Debt.org , a financial consulting organization serving the public, the average urgent care visit costs between $150 and $200. ER visits can cost between $600 for a minor problem to well over $3,000 for a serious health issue or injury. On the other hand, typical co-pays for a visit to a primary care physician range from $15 to $25.  Getting regular checkups isn‘t just a health decision, it‘s also an economic one. Primary care doctor visits are the lowest cost point of care. Most health insurance plans offer lower co-pays for primary care visits. The cost changes dramatically with emergency room or urgent care center visits and that’s bad for the pocketbook.

For peace of mind

6. For peace of mind

Everyone has likely played the (not-so-fun) game of “Google my symptoms.” With the internet and sites like WebMD, it’s easy and tempting to consider yourself a professional and to self-diagnose what could be wrong. But, you’re just not qualified. Self-diagnosing based on internet articles alone is not only a bad idea, it can also lead to unnecessary worry and fear.

Opt to visit your trusted primary care doctor instead. She will understand your unique medical history and be able to provide a personalized evaluation that exceeds the limitations of your WebMD diagnosis. Schedule an appointment with your doctor so she can paint the full health picture for you — and provide any necessary treatment to keep you in your best health.

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Why doctors have started recording appointments for their patients

To help their patients better remember bits of information, more and more doctors are, with their patients’ consent, recording appointments.

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Imagine you’re an older patient who has trouble remembering detailed bits of information. Maybe you have hearing loss. Or perhaps with a plethora of doctor’s appointments to attend, it’s challenging for you to recall everything your specialist says.

In situations like these, wouldn’t it be nice to have a recording of your doctor’s appointment?

doctor visit reasons

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That’s what Dr. James Ryan, a family practitioner in Ludington, Michigan, thinks.

After obtaining consent from his patients, Ryan records their appointments and subsequently uploads them to a secure online platform, according to  The New York Times . The patients and their family members can then listen in whenever they want.

And he’s not the only one doing this.

Dr. Randall Porter, a neurosurgeon based in Phoenix, videotapes his patients’ appointments (with their approval) and uploads them to Medical Memory , a secure web platform he founded.  The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice has started studying recording procedures . Through the Oliver Center for Patient Safety and Quality Healthcare , the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston started offering cancer patients recorders to use during appointments. 

doctor visit reasons

At ViVE 2024, Panelists Share Prior Authorization Progress and Frustration in Payer Insights Program

At the Payer Insights sessions on Day 1 of ViVE 2024, a panel on prior authorization offered compelling insights from speakers who shared the positive developments in this area after years of mounting frustration. Speakers also shared challenges as they work with providers to figure out how policy developments and technology will work in practice.

The results thus far have been positive. A review published in 2014 looked at 33 studies comparing recorded doctor’s appointments. The majority found that recording consultations helped patients better understand and recall the information their clinician gave them.

But it’s not just the physicians who have been initiating — and doing — the recording. It’s also the patients, and sometimes it’s not so openly acknowledged.

In a  survey of 168 patients in the United Kingdom, 15 percent (or 19 respondents) indicated they had secretly recorded a clinical encounter.

Such a sly method wasn’t exactly smiled upon by the study researchers. And it could result in legal ramifications if done in America. In 11 states (California, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Washington), laws require that all parties (the patient and the physician) consent to any recording that happens.

But in some cases, covertly recording could actually be helpful.

A few years ago, a Virginia man went in for a colonoscopy and inadvertently recorded the entire procedure on his smartphone. He later listened to the recording, only to find that the surgical team had hurled epithets at him while he was sedated. A jury subsequently ordered man’s anesthesiologist and her practice to pay the patient $500,000, according to the  Chicago Tribune .

As technology becomes increasingly prevalent and healthcare searches for new ways to be patient-centric, perhaps recording will become the norm.

Photo: Buero Monaco, Getty Images

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Going to the Doctor: ESL Lesson Plan [Free Download]

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Health is a universal concern and navigating healthcare can be one of the most important yet challenging experiences in a new language or country. Understanding and effectively communicating health needs in English is a vital skill for English learners, particularly for those living in English-speaking environments.

going to the doctor esl lesson plan

This lesson plan, “Going to the Doctor,” is designed specifically to assist English as a Second Language (ESL) students in developing the vocabulary and communication skills necessary to interact effectively with healthcare professionals. By exploring the different steps involved in a typical doctor’s visit and introducing key health-related vocabulary , this lesson aims to familiarize students with the healthcare process and provide them with the confidence to express health concerns and understand medical advice in English.

Through a series of well-structured activities including dialogue practice, role-play scenarios, and an interactive quiz, students will be engaged in the learning process, putting into practice what they’ve learned, and making the lesson’s content relevant and memorable.

By the end of this lesson, students will be well-equipped to handle a visit to the doctor in English, fostering their overall language competence and confidence.

Students will be able to understand and use medical and health vocabulary, converse effectively with healthcare professionals, and comprehend the purpose and process of a doctor’s appointment.

Approximately 60 minutes.

  • Whiteboard & markers
  • Handout with dialogues and vocabulary
  • Role-play scenarios cards
  • Images or flashcards related to the topic

Warm-Up (10 minutes)

Vocabulary introduction.

Introduce the necessary vocabulary to the students. Use images or flashcards to explain words related to health and doctor visits. Vocabulary might include:

  • Appointment
  • Prescription
  • Examination

Check comprehension by asking students to match the words with images or descriptions.

Presentation (15 minutes)

Purpose of visiting a doctor.

Explain the reasons people visit doctors: preventative care, diagnosing and treating illness, managing chronic conditions, etc. Discuss the importance of regular check-ups and vaccinations.

The Process of a Doctor’s Visit

Explain the steps typically involved in a doctor’s visit:

  • Making an appointment
  • Checking in at the reception
  • Describing symptoms to the nurse or doctor
  • Examination by the doctor
  • Receiving a diagnosis or treatment plan
  • Collecting a prescription, if necessary

Practice (20 minutes)

Dialogue practice.

Provide a handout with dialogues illustrating a typical interaction between a patient and a doctor. Read through the dialogues as a class, clarifying any difficult phrases or expressions.

Dialogue might include useful phrases like:

  • “I would like to make an appointment.”
  • “What seems to be the problem?”
  • “I’ve been feeling sick for a few days.”
  • “It hurts when I…”
  • “You need to take this medication twice a day.”

Split the class into pairs and have them practice the dialogue, swapping roles halfway through.

Role-play Activity

Prepare role-play scenario cards describing different health issues (e.g., a cold, a sprained ankle, a stomachache). Split students into pairs and distribute the role-play cards. One student in each pair will play the patient and the other the doctor. The ‘patient’ will explain their ‘symptoms’, and the ‘doctor’ will ‘diagnose’ the issue and provide advice or ‘prescription’. Encourage students to use the vocabulary and phrases they’ve learned.

Production (10 minutes)

Interactive quiz.

Prepare a quiz based on the lesson’s content to reinforce students’ understanding of the vocabulary and the process of going to the doctor. Questions might include:

  • “What should you say when making an appointment?”
  • “What is a prescription?”
  • “What might a doctor say when examining a patient?”

Students can work in groups to answer the questions.

Wrap-Up (5 minutes)

End the lesson by encouraging students to share their experiences of going to the doctor in their home country and compare them with what they’ve learned about the process in English-speaking countries. Ask them to reflect on the new vocabulary they’ve learned, and how it might help them in real-life situations.

In this lesson, students have the opportunity to build their medical vocabulary, understand the purpose and process of visiting a doctor, and practice their conversational skills in a relevant context. By integrating interactive and engaging activities, this lesson supports learners in becoming more comfortable and confident when going to the doctor in English-speaking environments.

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Healthcare in Moscow – Personal and Family Medicine

Emergency : 112 or 103

Obstetric & gynecologic : +7 495 620-41-70

About medical services in Moscow

Moscow polyclinic

Moscow polyclinic

Emergency medical care is provided free to all foreign nationals in case of life-threatening conditions that require immediate medical treatment. You will be given first aid and emergency surgery when necessary in all public health care facilities. Any further treatment will be free only to people with a Compulsory Medical Insurance, or you will need to pay for medical services. Public health care is provided in federal and local care facilities. These include 1. Urban polyclinics with specialists in different areas that offer general medical care. 2. Ambulatory and hospitals that provide a full range of services, including emergency care. 3. Emergency stations opened 24 hours a day, can be visited in a case of a non-life-threatening injury. It is often hard to find English-speaking staff in state facilities, except the largest city hospitals, so you will need a Russian-speaking interpreter to accompany your visit to a free doctor or hospital. If medical assistance is required, the insurance company should be contacted before visiting a medical facility for treatment, except emergency cases. Make sure that you have enough money to pay any necessary fees that may be charged.

Insurance in Russia

EMIAS ATM

Travelers need to arrange private travel insurance before the journey. You would need the insurance when applying for the Russian visa. If you arrange the insurance outside Russia, it is important to make sure the insurer is licensed in Russia. Only licensed companies may be accepted under Russian law. Holders of a temporary residence permit or permanent residence permit (valid for three and five years respectively) should apply for «Compulsory Medical Policy». It covers state healthcare only. An employer usually deals with this. The issued health card is shown whenever medical attention is required. Compulsory Medical Policyholders can get basic health care, such as emergencies, consultations with doctors, necessary scans and tests free. For more complex healthcare every person (both Russian and foreign nationals) must pay extra, or take out additional medical insurance. Clearly, you will have to be prepared to wait in a queue to see a specialist in a public health care facility (Compulsory Medical Policyholders can set an appointment using EMIAS site or ATM). In case you are a UK citizen, free, limited medical treatment in state hospitals will be provided as a part of a reciprocal agreement between Russia and UK.

Some of the major Russian insurance companies are:

Ingosstrakh , Allianz , Reso , Sogaz , AlfaStrakhovanie . We recommend to avoid  Rosgosstrakh company due to high volume of denials.

Moscow pharmacies

A.v.e pharmacy in Moscow

A.v.e pharmacy in Moscow

Pharmacies can be found in many places around the city, many of them work 24 hours a day. Pharmaceutical kiosks operate in almost every big supermarket. However, only few have English-speaking staff, so it is advised that you know the generic (chemical) name of the medicines you think you are going to need. Many medications can be purchased here over the counter that would only be available by prescription in your home country.

Dental care in Moscow

Dentamix clinic in Moscow

Dentamix clinic in Moscow

Dental care is usually paid separately by both Russian and expatriate patients, and fees are often quite high. Dentists are well trained and educated. In most places, dental care is available 24 hours a day.

Moscow clinics

«OAO Medicina» clinic

«OAO Medicina» clinic

It is standard practice for expats to visit private clinics and hospitals for check-ups, routine health care, and dental care, and only use public services in case of an emergency. Insurance companies can usually provide details of clinics and hospitals in the area speak English (or the language required) and would be the best to use. Investigate whether there are any emergency services or numbers, or any requirements to register with them. Providing copies of medical records is also advised.

Moscow hosts some Western medical clinics that can look after all of your family’s health needs. While most Russian state hospitals are not up to Western standards, Russian doctors are very good.

Some of the main Moscow private medical clinics are:

American Medical Center, European Medical Center , Intermed Center American Clinic ,  Medsi , Atlas Medical Center , OAO Medicina .

Several Russian hospitals in Moscow have special arrangements with GlavUPDK (foreign diplomatic corps administration in Moscow) and accept foreigners for checkups and treatments at more moderate prices that the Western medical clinics.

Medical emergency in Moscow

Moscow ambulance vehicle

Moscow ambulance vehicle

In a case of a medical emergency, dial 112 and ask for the ambulance service (skoraya pomoshch). Staff on these lines most certainly will speak English, still it is always better to ask a Russian speaker to explain the problem and the exact location.

Ambulances come with a doctor and, depending on the case, immediate first aid treatment may be provided. If necessary, the patient is taken to the nearest emergency room or hospital, or to a private hospital if the holder’s insurance policy requires it.

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Specialist doctors accept new pay offer from government

The deal follows months of negotiations and the rejection of a previous offer by what the NHS calls SAS Doctors - who are "experienced, senior doctors who for a variety of reasons, didn't go down the traditional GP or consultant training pathway".

Tuesday 18 June 2024 14:36, UK

Staff on a NHS hospital ward

Specialist, associate specialist, and specialty (SAS) doctors in England have voted in favour of a new pay deal from the government.

The British Medical Association (BMA) said 79.3% of members who took part in the ballot backed the new package.

It means SAS doctors on open contracts could see pay increases of between 9.5% and 19.4% compared with 2022/23.

It also includes a consolidated uplift of £1,400 to each pay point for SAS doctors on closed contracts.

This is on top of the 6% increase awarded by the Doctors' and Dentists' Review Body (DDRB) in 2023/24.

The deal follows months of negotiations and the rejection of a previous offer.

Though the dispute is now formally over, the BMA vowed to continue to push for further improvements to SAS doctors' pay and career development.

Dr Ujjwala Mohite, chairwoman of the BMA's SAS UK committee, said the package is "a step in the right direction in restoring SAS doctors' value in the NHS ".

"The next step is seeing what the next DDRB pay round brings, and whether it brings us any closer to giving all SAS doctors, on all contracts, what they deserve," she said.

Read more: Support for more NHS spending even if it means paying more tax - poll NHS waiting lists in England rise for first time in seven months

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She said not many people have heard of SAS doctors or know what they do, "but they are absolutely crucial to the running of the health service".

There are more than 10,000 SAS doctors working in the UK, according to the Association of Anaesthetists.

Dr Mohite said: "They are experienced, senior doctors who for a variety of reasons, didn't go down the traditional GP or consultant training pathway. They usually work in hospitals, delivering expert care alongside junior doctors and consultants."

She said a combination of "burnout, eroded pay, stunted career progression, and being taken for granted by the government" has seen many forced to leave the NHS altogether.

"Many SAS doctors also suffer from grade-ism - the idea that, because they don't fit into the traditional pathways, they are somehow not as important," she added.

"That's why, even though today marks significant progress in helping to keep more SAS doctors in the health service, the fight for pay restoration and improving the working lives of SAS doctors is far from over."

The Association of Anaesthetists says about 20% of hospital doctors in England are neither consultants nor junior doctors and many members of that group would identify themselves as SAS doctors.

Read more from Sky News: Three children missing after day out at theme park UK weather: 'Chance of heatwave by next week'

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doctor visit reasons

Junior doctors are set to go on strike from 7am on 27 June until 7am on 2 July, just days before the general election.

Consultants in England voted in April to accept an improved government pay deal , bringing to an end their year-long dispute which had led to strike action.

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25 reasons to go to Moscow

By Condé Nast Traveller

25 reasons to go to Moscow

The Russian capital is a dazzling mix of medieval churches, Soviet skyscrapers, art galleries, sushi bars, nightclubs and bath-houses. Benjamin Wegg-Prosser selects its 25 most compelling attractions:

1. Turandot

It's easy to believe reports that US$40 million was spent on creating the interior of this restaurant. Spread over 14 rooms, it includes homages to Louis XVI, the Ming Dynasty and imperial Russia. The Asian fusion menu reflects the chinoiserie adorning the main dining room, whose centrepiece is a mechanical golden peacock that rotates as the all-female orchestra plays. The waiting staff wear uniforms that would not be out of place in a BBC costume drama. Tverskoy bul'var 26/5, Moscow (00 7 495 739 0011)

25 reasons to go to Moscow

St Basil's Cathedral

2. St Basil's Cathedral

The recently restored onion domes shine out from the top of the cathedral which marks the eastern border of the Red Square. Napoleon's troops ransacked the building, and it was once scheduled for demolition by Stalin. Today it's the jewel in the crown of the Russian Orthodox Church. The icons inside are well worth inspecting, but even better is the people-watching outside: young couples have their picture taken with the domes in the background on their wedding day. Krasnaya ploshchad (Red Square), Moscow (00 7 495 698 3304); open 11am-5pm, Wed-Mon

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Graveyard of the fallen monuments

3. Graveyard of the fallen monuments

Ever wondered where the statues of Soviet heroeswere dumped when Communism collapsed? Many of them can be found in the grounds of the new Tretyakov gallery The most intimidating figure is that of Felix Dzerzhinsky, founder of the Cheka - the organisation that was to become the KGB. His statue was toppled in the aftermath of the failed coup of August 1991 and removed from Lubyanka ploshchad. At the State Tretyakov Gallery, 10 Krymsky Val, Moscow ( www.tretyakovgallery.ru ); open Tue-Sun, 10am-7.30pm

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Golden Apple

4. Golden Apple

It calls itself a 'boutique hotel', but with 92 rooms the Golden Apple wouldn't get away with that description west of Warsaw. Given the size of most Moscow hotels, however, the title is deserved. The price of accommodation in the city is hard to stomach, but this one is one of few places where the rates can probably be justified. Five minutes from Pushkinskaya Square (the Piccadilly Circus of Moscow), it is very well located for discovering the city. [i]Malaya Dmitrovka 11, Moscow (00 7 495 980 7000; www.goldenapple.ru );

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Museum of the Great Patriotic War

5. Museum of the Great Patriotic War

You'll understand how marking the defeat of Germany in 1945 has become a form of state religion when you visit this stunning museum dedicated to World War II. It's set at the heart of Park Pobedy (Victory Park) and includes an art gallery, a hall of remembrance and some fantastic exhibits. Highlights for any history buff include the Nazi declaration of surrender and the table and chairs used by Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill during the 1943 Tehran conference. Park Pobedy 3, Moscow; open Tue-Sun

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Gorky's house

6. Gorky's house

Despite falling in and out with the Communist Party throughout his career, Maxim Gorky was one of the Soviet era's most important authors. He was rewarded with this stunning house when he returned to Moscow from exile in Italy. The Art Nouveau building was originally the home of Ryabushinsky, an oligarch who fled to France as the Bolsheviks took power. Visitors can see Gorky's study and admire the centrepiece of the house: a limestone staircase which seems to melt into the floor. Malaya Nikitskaya 6/2, Moscow (00 7 495 290 5130); open Wed-Sun.

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Lenin's tomb

7. Lenin's tomb

Arguably the most influential political figure of the 20th century lies embalmed in a building that is most recognisable as the place from which Communist Party bosses used to watch military parades in Red Square. The authorities maintain that the body really is Lenin's and that its wax-like appearance is due to the embalming chemicals. His clothes are changed every few years so he keeps up to date with fashion, if nothing else. Krasnaya ploshchad (Red Square), Moscow (00 7 495 623 5527); open Tue-Thu; Sat-Sun

25 reasons to go to Moscow

The Moscow metro

8. The Moscow metro

Spread across 180 stations, Moscow's underground rail system is a tribute to Soviet engineering and new Russian efficiency. With trains running every 90 seconds and the roads permanently clogged with traffic, the metro is the city's most practical form of transport. The earliest stations are architectural masterpieces, with Ploshchad Revolutsii, Kievskaya and Komsomolskaya really standing out. Visitors are advised to learn a little of the Cyrillic alphabet to help decipher the station names.

25 reasons to go to Moscow

The State Tretyakov Gallery

9. The State Tretyakov Gallery

These galleries - in two separate locations - house the best examples of Russian art from before and after the revolution. Most of the pieces in the old Tretyakov (at 10 Lavrushinsky pereulok) were in private hands before being nationalised in 1917. Its collection includes 'Rublev's Trinity', said to be the finest remaining Russian icon. The new Tretyakov (at 10 Krymsky Val) showcases all the main Russian art periods that followed the revolution and includes well-known works such as Petrov-Vodkin's Bathing of a Red Horse (pictured). The garden houses the Graveyard of the Fallen Monuments. 10 Lavrushinsky pereulok and 10 Krymsky Val, Moscow ( www.tretyakovgallery.ru ); open Tue-Sun, 10.30am-7.30pm

25 reasons to go to Moscow

10. 02 Lounge

Under a glass dome on the top floor of the Ritz-Carlton, Moscow, this bar has the city's best close-up views of the Kremlin. The food menu includes sushi rolls and sashimi. The drinks menu is supervised by a vodka sommelier who oversees 400 varieties of the spirit. The prices are shocking. Tverskaya ulitsa 3, Moscow (00 7 495 255 8888; www.ritzcarlton.com ).

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Shop & Bar Denis Simachev

11. Shop & Bar Denis Simachev

Denis Simachev is Moscow's Malcolm McLaren, and his bar has its own fashion store. Simachev is one of a small band of cultural entrepreneurs who have created a genuinely new, 'modern Russian' brand. The main conversation piece in the bar is the mural in which the world leaders of the early 21st century are shown dining in a prison canteen. Great international comfort food is on offer, including Moscow's best steak sandwich. Stoleshnikov preulok 12/2, Moscow (00 7 495 629 5702)

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Having opened after the financial crisis, this bar sets a more modest tone than its competitors. But it still manages a few superlatives, including stunning modern art and the longest bar in Moscow, at 30 metres. It's going after the forty-something market, or the 'mature hipster' as the management would have it. The bartenders are reputed to be the best in town. The building was previously a lightbulb factory, hence the name: luch translates as 'ray of light'. Bolshaya Pirogovskaya ulitsa 27/1, Moscow (00 7 495 287 0022)

25 reasons to go to Moscow

13. The Most

In the heart of Moscow's central night-life district, ]this swanky nightspot includes a bar, restaurant and basement nightclub. The club's cavernous room is spanned by mechanical bridges, an architectural play on words: most means 'bridge' in Russian. The venue entered football folklore when Roman Abramovich chose it as the place to drown his sorrows following Chelsea's defeat by Manchester United in the 2008 Champions League final held in Moscow. Kuznetsky Most 6/3, Moscow (00 7 495 660 0706; www.themost.ru ).

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Nobu Moscow

14. Nobu Moscow

The owners took the brave decision to open this outpost of the Japanese restaurant at the apex of the financial crisis. They have been rewarded for their courage by securing it a reputation as the place for oligarchs to lunch. Since the fall of the USSR, Japanese food has become a staple diet for Muscovites, and the launch of Nobu was a natural next step. The company's owners had been fending off proposals for a Russian branch for more than a decade, so the restaurant's success is no great surprise. Dmitrovka ulitsa 20, Moscow (00 7 495 645 3191; www.noburestaurants.ru )

25 reasons to go to Moscow

15. Bosco Café

This Italian restaurant offers three essential services: an excellent watering hole in which to rest after exploring GUM, the huge shopping mall which runs along the northern side of the Red Square, opposite the Kremlin; fine views of Lenin's tomb; and an excellent cappuccino. The veal chop is as good as you would get in Milan, and the terrace is without a doubt the best summer spot in the city. Red Square (Krasnaya ploshchad) 3, Moscow (00 7 495 620 3182)

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Café Pushkin

16. Café Pushkin

This is the first port of call for anyone who wants to experience quality Russian food. At first glance the building appears to be a stunningly preserved 19th-century townhouse; on closer inspection the façades are entirely fake. But this lack of authenticity is not reflected in the food, especially the outstanding meat pies and dumplings. The slickest waiters in Moscow even have a trolley with a dozen different mineral waters. Tverskoy bul'var 26a. Moscow (00 7 495 739 0033; www.cafe-pushkin.ru )

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Eliseevskiy

17. Eliseevskiy

This is the Moscow equivalent of the food hall at Harrods. Located in a late 18th-century mansion with stunning interiors, it was renamed 'Gastronom No 1' during the Soviet period but has now gone back to its pre-revolutionary name. In recent years new branded supermarkets with a fine selection of goods have started to overshadow this grande dame , but it's still a special place to visit. Tverskaya ulitsa 14, Moscow (00 7 495 650 4643; eliseevskiy.ru )

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Bolshoi Theatre

18. Bolshoi Theatre

The Bolshoi stages operas and ballets, was the venue for Swan Lake 's première in 1877 and is home to the best-known dance company in the world. It is in fact two different theatres. The original stage is currently undergoing renovations and will not reopen until 2013 (eight years after it closed); but the new theatre has regular performances. Teatralnaya ploshchad 1, Moscow (00 7 495 250 7317; www.bolshoi.ru )

25 reasons to go to Moscow

TASS building

19. TASS building

Before the USSR fell, nearly everything we in the West knew about Russia came out of his building the home of the principal state-run news agency, TASS. Although it has been eclipsed by other news sources, its HQ remains a splendid example of tasteful 1960s Soviet architecture and is well worth a photo stop. Tverskoy bul'var 10-12, Moscow

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Stalin's skyscrapers

20. Stalin's skyscrapers

There are seven of these so-called 'wedding cake' buildings dotted across the city. Their mock-Gothic style would not look out of place in Gotham City. Stalin ordered their construction in the aftermath of World War II (and made use of free labour in the form of German POWs) to put his capital on an architectural par with the great cities of North America. The largest and most memorable is the Moscow State University building on Vorobyovy Gory (Sparrow Hills). The Hilton Moscow Leningrandskaya is housed in another.

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Bolshoi restaurant

21. Bolshoi restaurant

Set between Kuznetsky Most and Petrovka ulitsa, this is Arkady Novikov's most recent venture. To Muscovites, Novikov needs no introduction: he is the man behind most of the city's poshest restaurants. Legend has it that he started out flipping burgers in a Moscow McDonald's and caught the entrepreneurial bug. His latest outlet offers modern Slavonic cooking. The golubtsy (a Ukrainian dish of mince rolled in cabbage) comes highly recommended. Petrovka ulitsa 3/6, Moscow (00 7 495 789 8652; novikovgroup.ru )

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Moscow conservatory

22. Moscow conservatory

Russians take their classical music very seriously, and nowhere is more serious than the Moscow Conservatory. It's a series of concert halls and a school rolled into one. Every Russian classical star, be they composer or musician, has played or taught here, including Rachmaninov, Tchaikovsky and Richter. Tickets are relatively easy to get, either from the box office or from babushkas who sell them for a small profit on the street outside. Bolshaya Nikitskaya ulitsa 13/6, Moscow (00 7 495 629 8183; www.mosconsv.ru )

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Pasternak's house

23. Pasternak's house

In Peredelkino, a small village 25 minutes by train from Kievsky station, is the dacha were Boris Pasternak lived for the last two decades of his life. The house was turned into a museum after his death, but his family still live in the grounds. On the first floor you can sit at the desk where he completed Dr Zhivago ; and on the ground floor you can see the early Soviet TV and fridge of which he was the proud owner. Pavlenko ulitsa 3, Peredelkino (00 7 495 934-51-75; www.pasternakmuseum.ru ); open Thu-Sun, 10am-4pm; closed the last day of each month

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Izmailovsky Park

24. Izmailovsky Park

No trip to Moscow is complete without haggling for a bust of Lenin or a set of matryoshka dolls, and the only place to do it properly is Izmailovsky Park, at the metro station of the same name. The market, set in a 16th-century royal estate, is open every weekend and has a great variety of decent souvenirs.

25 reasons to go to Moscow

Sanduny Banya

25. Sanduny Banya

The 19th-century decor of the Sanduny Banya bath-house is reminiscent of a gentlemen's club in London's St James's. But the experience is uniquely Russian, as are the felt hats worn to protect your hair from the steam. The steam room is a vast, wood-panelled chamber with a huge open oven. Foreigners are made welcome by regulars, who are happy to inflict a beating with birch leaves (more refreshing than it sounds). After you've had a good thrashing, the waiters will bring you anything from tea and honey to prawns and beer. Neglinnaya ulitsa 14, Moscow (00 7 495 625 4631; www.sanduny.ru )

By Benjamin Wegg-Prosser: published in May 2010

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COMMENTS

  1. Top List of Reasons People Go To the Doctor

    January 16, 2013. A new Mayo Clinic Proceedings study shows people most often visit health care providers because of skin issues, joint disorders and back pain . Jennifer St. Sauver, Ph.D. , says, "Much research already has focused on chronic conditions, which account for the majority of health care utilization and costs in middle-aged and ...

  2. Why do patients visit their doctors? Assessing the most prevalent

    Chronic diseases account for the majority of health care utilization and expenditures in middle-aged and older populations. 1-3 As the population ages, more individuals are living with multiple chronic medical conditions. One-fourth of Americans with chronic conditions account for almost two-thirds of the total healthcare expenditures. 4 Research on chronic disease has largely focused on a ...

  3. 10 Reasons You Should Go to the Doctor (Even When You're ...

    1. To Establish a Good Relationship With Your Physician. If you never see a doctor, you can't ever have a relationship with one. On the other hand, having a regular physician means having someone who knows the intricacies of your medical history and who will work with you to shape your healthy present and future.

  4. What are the most common conditions in primary care?

    Reasons for visits were defined as the reasons patients presented to primary care or the problems managed by physicians. For each of the top RFVs (up to 20 per study), the number, percent, or rate of visits associated with each condition were recorded. ... Ministry of Health - Manatū Hauora [website] Family doctors: methodology and ...

  5. Top reasons to visit your primary care provider

    Kidney disease. Heart disease. Post-stroke treatment. High cholesterol. Musculoskeletal issues like arthritis. Skin issues like psoriasis. Lung diseases and conditions like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) If your chronic disease warranted a visit to a specialist, once your chronic disease is stable, primary care ...

  6. Top 10 Reasons Why Patients Come to Primary Care

    Why do patients visit primary care offices? For which conditions are they more likely to visit a surgical or medical specialty office-or a hospital outpatient or emergency department?The CDC's FastStats on Ambulatory Care Use and Physician Office Visits provides lots of answers in "Selected patient and provider characteristics for ambulatory care visits to physician offices and hospital ...

  7. Top Reasons for Primary Care Visits

    Most Common Reasons for Visits to Primary Care, All Countries. Rank Clinician-reported ... The Doctor's Visit of the Future: Less Touching, More Tech; 2001/s/viewarticle/995599.

  8. Top 10 Most Common Reasons to Visit the Doctor and Tips for Prevention

    Prevention. High blood pressure can be avoided by eating a heart-healthy diet consisting of fruits, vegetables, nuts and fish. Being active, abstaining from tobacco and maintaining a healthy weight can also help promote heart health. 9. Headaches and Migraines. Headaches refer to pain in any region of the head.

  9. The Top 10 Reasons People Visit Their Primary Care Physician

    An exhaustive report in 2018 reviewed 12 scientific databases and chose 18 studies from 12 countries with a median of 250,000 patients, or more than 83,000 visits, around the world to evaluate the reasons for visits. Here are the 10 most common patient-reported reasons: Cough. Back pain. Abdominal symptoms. Pharyngitis. Dermatitis. Fever. Headache.

  10. 10 Reasons Why You Need a Primary Care Doctor

    A primary care doctor can help you stay organized and aware of how your chronic disease is affecting your body. Scheduling regular visits and performing routine tests are two ways your doctor can help you better maintain your chronic disease. 3. Higher Level of Comfort.

  11. Deciding When to See a Doctor

    But if you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor: Painful swallowing (more than a sore or dry throat) Earache. A cough that lasts more than 2 or 3 weeks. Persistent or severe vomiting. A fever that doesn't go down or go away. Symptoms that last more than 10 days or get worse instead of better. Diarrhea.

  12. Mayo Clinic IDs the top 10 reasons for doctors' visits

    Skin ailments, joint disorders, and back pain—not life-threatening conditions—are the most common reasons for visits to U.S. health care providers, according to a new Mayo Clinic Proceedings study.. For the study, Mayo Clinic researchers used data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project—a comprehensive medical records linkage system—to categorize the medical diagnoses of Olmsted County ...

  13. Getting the Most Out of Your Doctor Appointment

    One way to do this is to make sure you get the most out of your office visit by preparing ahead of time and creating an agenda for your visit with your doctor. When you prepare for your appointment ahead of time, both you and your doctor will find the visit more helpful. Here are some tips you can follow for what to do before, during, and after ...

  14. Why Patients Visit Their Doctors: Assessing the Most Prevalent

    Why Patients Visit Their Doctors: Assessing the Most Prevalent Conditions in a Defined American Population. Jennifer L. St. Sauver, PhD, MPH ... that resources to diagnose, treat, and prevent joint pain may be required; however, joint pain occurs for multiple reasons. Overuse and activity injuries can cause short-term pain, whereas chronic ...

  15. Top 6 reasons to visit the doctor (even if you're not sick!)

    We look at a few reasons why you should see your primary care doc, even if you're not sick. ‍. 1. Relationship-building with your primary care physician. Another great reason to get in touch with your doctor is to make sure there aren't any hazardous medical conditions looming and unchecked.

  16. Why doctors have started recording appointments for their patients

    By PurpleLab. The results thus far have been positive. A review published in 2014 looked at 33 studies comparing recorded doctor's appointments. The majority found that recording consultations ...

  17. Going to the Doctor: ESL Lesson Plan [Free Download]

    Purpose of Visiting a Doctor. Explain the reasons people visit doctors: preventative care, diagnosing and treating illness, managing chronic conditions, etc. Discuss the importance of regular check-ups and vaccinations. The Process of a Doctor's Visit. Explain the steps typically involved in a doctor's visit: Making an appointment

  18. Healthcare in Moscow

    These include 1. Urban polyclinics with specialists in different areas that offer general medical care. 2. Ambulatory and hospitals that provide a full range of services, including emergency care. 3. Emergency stations opened 24 hours a day, can be visited in a case of a non-life-threatening injury.

  19. A Doctor's Visit by Anton Chekhov

    A Doctor's Visit. THE Professor received a telegram from the Lyalikovs' factory; he was asked to come as quickly as possible. The daughter of some Madame Lyalikov, apparently the owner of the factory, was ill, and that was all that one could make out of the long, incoherent telegram. And the Professor did not go himself, but sent instead his ...

  20. Specialist doctors accept new pay offer from government

    Specialist, associate specialist, and specialty (SAS) doctors in England have voted in favour of a new pay deal from the government. The British Medical Association (BMA) said 79.3% of members who ...

  21. 25 reasons to go to Moscow

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  22. Reasons to visit Moscow, Russia at least once in your lifetime

    You must visit Moscow, Russia, at least once in your lifetime because it is the most important historical, cultural, and administrative center. The capital of the world's largest country is regarded as rapid, energetic, congested, and magical due to its numerous historical neighborhoods and hidden jewels. This city deserves to be visited at ...

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