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Finland Travel Guide

Last Updated: August 9, 2023

a serene nature scene in Finland

Due to its out-of-the-way location and the fact that Finland is expensive, many travelers skip visiting the country when they explore Europe .

But this is a mistake.

Finland has a lot to offer and there are plenty of ways to save money here. I think it’s one of the most underrated destinations in Europe — especially if you love the outdoors!

This travel guide to Finland can help you plan your trip, save money, and make the most of your time in this amazing nation.

Table of Contents

  • Things to See and Do
  • Typical Costs
  • Suggested Budget
  • Money-Saving Tips
  • Where to Stay
  • How to Get Around
  • How to Stay Safe
  • Best Places to Book Your Trip
  • Related Blogs on Finland

Click Here for City Guides

Top 5 things to see and do in bath.

People skating and enjoying the snowy weather in beautiful Helsinki, Finland

1. Explore the Salla Reindeer Park

This park in the Arctic Circle is where you can feed reindeer, pet huskies, take a canoe trip, do some hiking, or try snowshoeing and skiing. There are reindeer competitions (reindeer are an important part of the indigenous culture here), husky sleigh rides, and midnight canoe trips when the sun is out all night. In the winter months you can experience the northern lights as you hike through the forest at night using snowshoes. If hiking isn’t your thing, there are nighttime reindeer sleigh rides for those hoping to see the northern lights. You can try out dogsledding and steer your very own team of huskies too. Admission to the park is 10 EUR (tours have additional costs).

2. See the Northern Lights in Lapland

This is hands-down one of the best things to do in the country. In the northern part of Lapland, you can see the northern lights shining almost every night when the sky is clear, whereas in southern Finland they are only visible 10-20 nights each year. Lapland is within the Arctic Circle so there is essentially 24 hours of darkness each day from November until January. There are plenty of guided tours you can join, though you can also venture out on your own to save money too if you’re on a budget. A three-hour snowmobile tour to see the northern lights costs around 155 EUR per person. September-April is the best time to see them.

3. Visit Santa Claus Village in Rovaniemi

This Christmas amusement park is great for anyone traveling with kids. You can meet “Santa,” do snow-shoeing safaris, feed reindeer, and learn about Finnish Christmas traditions through the ages. The adorable village includes Santa’s official office, his Christmas house, the main Santa Claus Post Office, and the house of Mrs. Claus and Santa’s reindeer. Adults can enjoy a variety of dining options ranging from upscale restaurants to fun bars. The Ice Bar is rebuilt each year and is full of snow and ice sculptures. Admission is free and the village is open all year.

4. Explore Helsinki

Historic, small, filled with green space, and set on the Baltic Sea, Helsinki is a scenic city that doesn’t get huge tourist crowds like other European capitals. Visit the six islands that make up Suomenlinna Sea Fortress (which dates to the late 1700s) or get your history fix at the National Museum of Finland. If you’re feeling the need for some relaxation, stop by one of Helsinki’s many saunas. And for a unique experience, book the sauna room on the Skywheel Helsinki Ferris wheel. The city is filled with world-class museums and restaurants and is perfect for a few days of exploring.

5. Stay in an ice hotel or glass igloo at the SnowHotel

Located in Lapland, everything in the SnowHotel is made of ice — including your bed (you get warm furs and sleeping bags, don’t worry)! The hotel is rebuilt each year from snow and ice, so the appearance is constantly changing. It sleeps up to 70 guests, and there are additional glass igloos that make for excellent star gazing. Enjoy sauna experiences, search for the northern lights, and plenty of ice art. There’s also an ice restaurant here too which serves local cuisine on frozen plates. The bar serves tasty craft cocktails in glasses made from ice too. A basic room with a double bed costs 200 EUR per night. You can also stay in smaller glass igloos as well.

Other Things to See and Do in Finland

1. go ice climbing.

Finland is known for its impressive ice formations, including frozen waterfalls and tall ice walls inside deep canyons or valleys. Companies like Bliss Adventure can outfit you with the right gear and introduce you to ice climbing in places like Tajukangas Falls and Korouoma Canyon (Korouoma is the most popular place to ice climb in the country). Prices vary but plan to spend around 100 EUR for a short tour. If you’re not afraid of heights and if you’re a bit of a thrill-seeker, try rappelling from the top of the Tajukangas Ice Falls (it’s about 30 meters high).

2. See Pakasaivo Lake

This lake in the north of Finland was once a place where indigenous Sámi worshipped. The 60-meter-deep lake is a meromictic lake, which means the water on the surface and at the bottom never mix (normal lakes mix at least once a year when the water at the surface cools off and becomes denser, causing it to sink). This creates an oxygen-free environment where the contents at the bottom are perfectly preserved. The area is known as the Hell of Lapland as people used to believe there was another realm under the lake. There is also a giant’s kettle here (a deep glacial pothole) that people believed tunneled all the way to hell.

3. Tour the King’s Road

This route is an old postal route running between Bergen, Norway to the former Finnish capital of Turku, and then across Finland to St. Petersburg, Russia. The 330-kilometer (205-mile) trail dates to the 15th century and it follows the southern coast of Finland. It’s accessible all year with well-paved roads and plenty of scenic stops along the way. You’ll take in manor houses, medieval churches, tiny villages, and endless scenic countryside. You can do the entire Finnish route in a day via car, though 2-3 days is better so you can make plenty of stops. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can also cycle the route in around one week.

4. Visit the Lampivaara Amethyst Mine

Lampivaara Hill is known for its amethysts (a type of purple quartz). The amethysts in this region were created 6 million years ago and on a mine tour, you can learn more about this precious mineral and then get a chance to dig around and find your own to take home as a souvenir. The mine is part of Pyhä-Luosto National Park and is located in northern Finland 90 minutes north of Rovaniemi. Tour prices vary from 35-66 EUR per person and include transportation. If you have your own vehicle, you can visit and tour the mine for 19 EUR.

5. Explore Raanua Wildlife Park

This is the northernmost nature reserve in the world and a fun place to visit with kids. There are over 50 different animal species here, including the only polar bears in Finland as well as lynx, wolves, and brown bears. Because it’s a predominantly outdoor park, you’re able to see the animals in a much more natural habitat than most zoos. There is no artificial lighting or indoor enclosures so you need to bring your own flashlight if visiting later in the day during the winter (when the sun sets early). Admission is 23.50 EUR.

6. See the Old Church of Sodankylä

Located in Lapland, this church is Finland’s best-preserved wooden church. The steeple-less church was built from timber in 1689 and was commissioned by King Charles XI of Sweden, who paid for it. The exterior and interior are incredibly well-preserved, with a dark timber interior and exterior that resembles more of a log cabin than a traditional European church. In the summer, religious services and weddings are often held here. Admission is free but be sure to dress respectfully.

7. Learn Finnish cultural history

The ethnographic Museum of Local History in Kemijärvi showcases what life was like in rural Finland at the turn of the 20th century. The main building is home to a traditional farmhouse and living quarters, maid’s chamber, daughter-in-law’s chamber, and living room so show you exactly what life was like for the Finnish working class. In addition to the house, the grounds include a granary, a workshop, a smoke sauna, a barn, and a stable that you can wander and explore. Admission is 10 EUR.

8. Go hiking

There are almost 40 national parks in Finland, each with hiking trails and camping sites. In the winter, they make for great places to cross-country ski or go snowshoeing. Nuuksio National Park is only 45 minutes from Helsinki and is filled with calm lakes, green forests, and rocky trails. Archipelago National Park, in Southwestern Finland, has more islands than any archipelago in the world. With its calm islets and colorful villages, canoeing or kayaking this park is a must. If you want to get off the beaten path, be sure to visit Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park in the north, where you can hike and stay in traditional villages. Additionally, wild camping is free in all the national parks as Finland has ‘freedom to roam’ laws ( Jokamiehen Oikeudet ) that enable you to wild camp in national parks if you are quiet and respectful.

9. Explore the Harbor Islands

There are over 330 islands that make up the Helsinki city archipelago. Suomenlinna is the easiest to reach with regular municipal ferries (you can take a ferry directly from Market Square). Vallisaari and Kuninkaansaari are two other islands worth visiting, as they used to be military bases closed off to the public (during the Viking era, Vallisaari was used as an outpost that would light a fire whenever a Viking raid was coming so people could prepare). The islands have since been reclaimed by nature and turned into parks dotted with abandoned fortifications. You can explore on your own or take a guided tour; there are a ton to choose from, with most lasting 1-2 hours and costs around 25 EUR.

10. Compete in the Air Guitar World Championship

Held every year at the Oulu Music Video Festival, this competition started out as a joke in 1996 but has evolved into a major festival that attracts thousands. If you happen to be in Oulu in the month of August, be sure to check out this quirky competition. Anyone can enter with just a 35 EUR entry fee. Even if you don’t want to compete you should definitely attend if you can — it’s one of the most unique festivals in the world!

11. Wander the Seurasaari Open-Air Museum

Located north of Helsinki on Seurasaari Island, the Seurasaari Open-Air Museum allows you to get up close to numerous traditional Finnish buildings. They aren’t replicas either; the buildings were collected from all over the country and physically moved here. There are houses, cottages, outbuildings, a windmill, and more. Opened in 1909, guided tours are available daily during the summer. Admission is 10 EUR

12. Go skiing

Levi is Finland’s most beloved ski resort located in Lapland (it’s the location of the Alpine World Cup Race). There are 43 slopes here for all abilities and over 200 kilometers (124 miles) of trails for cross-country skiing. There’s even a dedicated area for snowboarders, plus dogsledding and a reindeer park. A one-day pass costs 49 EUR. Pyhä-Luosto National Park, Saariselkä, Kuusamo, and Jyväskylä are other excellent places to ski too.

13. See Turun Linna (Turku Castle)

Turun Linna (Turku Castle) is located in Turku on the Aura River. The castle dates back to the 1200s and is one of the oldest buildings in the country. It helped defend the region from Russia during the Middle Ages, though much of the castle was destroyed during World War II and later rebuilt. Inside are two large dungeons as well as ornate banquet halls that are often used for municipal events. Tours take place all summer (June to August) and admission is 12 EUR.

14. Learn about the Sámi

The Sámi are the only indigenous people in the EU. Their language and culture are endangered, and so they’re governed by an autonomous government in Inari (Finland’s largest municipality). They’re famously known for their reindeer herding, which is at the core of their culture. Visit communities in Inari, Enontekiö, and Utsjoki to see Sámi culture up close. In Inari, don’t miss the Siida indoor and outdoor museum where you’ll learn about culture, art, and nature through interactive exhibits. But if you want to really spend time with the Sámi, come in spring when most of the Sami markets, concerts, and dances take place all over Northern Lapland. VisitLapland.com has a comprehensive list of activities and tours for getting to know the Sami people, including a visit to a traditional reindeer farm.

Finland Travel Costs

Busy traffic on a street in Helsinki, Finland, with a tram in the foreground

Finland has “freedom to roam” laws that enable free wild camping all around the country for those with a tent. If you’d prefer to stay in a campground with amenities, expect to pay 14-18 EUR for a basic tent plot for two people without electricity.

Budget hotel prices – A budget hotel with a private bathroom starts at 80-120 EUR during the peak summer season. In the off-season, budget rooms start at 65 EUR.

On Airbnb, private rooms start at 40 EUR (though they average double that). If you’re looking for an entire home or apartment, expect to pay at least 75 EUR, though prices usually average over 100 EUR. Book early for the best deals.

Food – Finnish cuisine leans heavily on fish, meat (specifically pork), and hearty vegetables like potatoes. Reindeer is commonly eaten as well as wild game like deer and moose. Smoked salmon and smoked or pickled herring are also popular dishes. Like their Scandinavian neighbors, Finns also enjoy dark bread and cheeses, usually as part of an open-faced sandwich (these are the go-to breakfast choice).

Overall, food in Finland is expensive. Your average casual restaurant charges around 13 EUR for a meal while fast food (think McDonald’s) is 9 EUR. For a three-course meal with table service, expect to pay at least 40-80 EUR.

Pizza costs around 8-10 EUR for a large while Thai or Chinese food costs 10-15 EUR for a main dish. If you want to splash out while in Helsinki, I suggest Ravintola Aino for good Finnish food (try the reindeer). Dishes cost between 50-62 EUR but are incredibly tasty!

Beer costs 7 EUR while a latte/cappuccino is 4 EUR. Bottled water is 1.70 EUR.

If you plan on cooking your own food, groceries cost between 50-65 EUR per week for basic staples like vegetables, bread, pasta, and some fish or meat.

Backpacking Finland Suggested Budgets

On a backpacking budget of 70 EUR per day, you can stay in a hostel dorm, cook all your meals, limit your drinking, take public transportation to get around, and do free activities like visiting the free museums, hitting the beach, and relaxing in the parks. If you plan on drinking, add 10-15 EUR to your daily budget.

On a mid-range budget of 140 EUR, you can stay in a private hostel room or Airbnb, eat out for some meals, have a couple of drinks, take the occasional taxi, and do more paid activities like visiting museums, skiing, or taking a guided tour of Suomenlinna Fortress.

On a “luxury” budget of 290 EUR or more per day, you can stay in a hotel, eat out for all your meals, drink as much as you want, rent a car to explore, and do whatever activities you want. This is just the ground floor for luxury though. The sky is the limit!

You can use the chart below to get some idea of how much you need to budget daily, depending on your travel style. Keep in mind these are daily averages — some days you’ll spend more, some days you’ll spend less (you might spend less every day). We just want to give you a general idea of how to make your budget. Prices are in EUR.

Finland Travel Guide: Money-Saving Tips

Finland isn’t cheap. Everything here is expensive due to high taxes and lots of imports. Fortunately, there are ways to save money if you know where to look. Here are my best money-saving tips for Finland:

  • Drink the tap water – The tap water here is some of the cleanest in the world and will save you from buying new water bottles all the time (and it cuts down waste too)! LifeStraw makes a reusable bottle with a built-in filter so you can always ensure your water is clean and safe.
  • Stay with a local for free – Couchsurfing connects you with a local who can host you for free. You may have to sleep on a couch, but you’ll get to make a new friend and get tons of insider information about the country.
  • Grocery shop – Buy basic staples like bread, meat, and cheese for breakfast or for a quick lunch on the go. It’s not glamorous, but by cooking your own meals you’ll save a ton of money, enabling you to eventually splurge on some great dinners.
  • Take a free tour – Green Cap Tours offer daily free walking tours around Helsinki. You get to see the main sights while interacting with an expert guide who can answer all your questions. Just be sure to tip at the end!
  • Get a Helsinki Card – There’s a lot to see in the city and paying 10-15 EUR per attraction adds up. This tourism card grants you free admission to the main sights (as well as access to the hop-on/hop-off bus) for 50 EUR (for a 24-hour pass). You can also get a 48-hour pass for 63 EUR or a 72-hour pass for 74 EUR. It includes discounts on some restaurants as well. For an additional charge, you can add free public transit as well.
  • Rideshare – If you want to save money on transportation around the country, there are numerous apps like Kyydit and Carpool World that can help. They’ll allow you to connect with drivers looking for extra passengers. While it isn’t free, it might be cheaper (and more convenient) than taking a bus or train.
  • Hitchhike – Hitchhiking isn’t super common here, however, it’s definitely possible and quite safe. Just use common sense and check Hitchwiki for specific tips and advice.

Where to Stay in Finland

Hostels can be found in a few of the larger cities around the country. Here are my recommended places to stay throughout the country:

  • Hostel Diana Park (Helsinki)
  • Eurohostel Helsinki (Helsinki)
  • Dream Hostel Tampere (Tampere)
  • Wherever Boutique Hostel (Rovaniemi)
  • Laivahostel S/S Bore (Turku)

How to Get Around Finland

a serene nature scene in Finland

Public transportation – Helsinki is the only city in Finland with a tram and metro system, though other cities and towns have public bus networks. They usually depart every 10-15 minutes with one-way tickets starting at 2.80 EUR.

Bus – Buses are the main form of intercity travel in Finland. A bus from Helsinki to Turku takes 2-2.5 hours and costs 10-15 EUR while the two-hour journey to Tampere is around 8 EUR. You can even take the bus from Helsinki to Rovaniemi (Lapland) for 54 EUR (it’s a 13-hour ride).

Matkahuolto is the main bus company. Use matkahuolto.fi/en to plan your journey. OnniBus is another intercity bus service. Prices are pretty consistent with Matkahuolto but fares can be up to 50% off if you book in advance rather than at the last minute.

Train – Trains are an excellent way to get around Finland and you rarely need to make a reservation ahead of time (you can book online at vr.fi). Trains are slightly more expensive than the bus but they are much more comfortable. Helsinki to Turku costs about 21 EUR for the two-hour trip, while Helsinki to Tampere starts from 20 EUR (and it’s also around two hours).

If you wait until the last minute, you can often find “saver deals” listed on the website (typically the night before). For example, at the time of writing this, last-minute fares for both the routes mentioned above are less than 9 EUR. So, generally, you can get them around 50% off the normal price if you’re flexible.

Bicycle – Finland is incredibly bike-friendly. All cities have bike lanes and there are endless paths with very few hills. There’s a bicycle rental service in almost every town, with prices starting from 15 EUR per day. You can often get discounts for multi-day or weekly rentals. For example, Bicyclean Helsinki has city bikes from 19 EUR per day while a week’s rental is 80 EUR.

Flying – Finnair is the main domestic airline in Finland, with fares between most destinations costing less than 100 EUR when booked in advance. Expect to pay double that for last-minute flights. You can pretty much fly anywhere in the country in around 90 minutes or less.

Flights from Helsinki to nearby Stockholm, Sweden or Oslo, Norway are also quite affordable, costing around 75 EUR (one way) when booked early.

Car rental – Cars can be rented for as little as 25 EUR per day for a multi-day rental. Drivers must be at least 20, have had their license for at least one year, and have an International Driving Permit (IDP). For the best car rental prices, use Discover Cars .

When to Go to Finland

The best time to visit Finland is largely based on what you want to do. If you want to experience Lapland at its peak awesomeness, come in December or January. Lapland is a wintery dream world in December due to the holiday decorations, Christmas markets, and the northern lights. Keep in mind it gets extremely cold in Finland during this time, no matter where you are in the country. The average daily temperature in the winter is -8°C (17°F).

Spring and autumn are the shoulder seasons and temperatures are still low. The average daily high in April is 2°C (37°F), while in October it’s 5°C (41°F). Both seasons are beautiful, though. In spring, everything is in full bloom; in autumn, the fall colors come out.

Summer is full of activities all around Finland, especially in Helsinki. With longer days (in summer, the sun won’t set until after 10:30pm) and warmer temperatures, Finnish people love enjoying the change in season. Parks and beaches are full and there are festivals all the time. The country is very lively. The average high in the south of the country is 15°C (64-72°F), however, so you’ll still want to pack warm clothes if you plan to visit Lapland, as temps up there will be cooler.

How to Stay Safe in Finland

Finland is super safe and the risk of violent crime here is incredibly low. Pick-pocketing can occur in Helsinki on public transpiration and at busy bus and train stations but even that is rare. Simply leave your valuables at home and be mindful of your surroundings while you’re out and about. Do that and you should be perfectly fine.

Be careful when using ATMs as credit card skimming is on the rise when using outdoor ATMs.

Scams here are rare, but, if you’re worried about getting ripped off, you can read about common travel scams to avoid on this blog post .

Solo female travelers should generally feel safe here. However, the standard precautions apply (never leave your drink unattended at the bar, never walk home alone intoxicated, etc.). You can read specific tips on one of the many solo female travel blogs on the web.

If you rent a car, don’t leave any valuables in it at night. Break-ins are rare, but it’s always better to be safe than sorry!

Your biggest concern in most areas is actually moose. Be careful when driving!

If you experience an emergency, dial 112 for assistance.

Always trust your gut instinct. Make copies of your personal documents, including your passport and ID. Forward your itinerary along to loved ones so they’ll know where you are.

The most important piece of advice I can offer is to purchase good travel insurance. Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. You can use the widget below to find the policy right for you:

Finland Travel Guide: The Best Booking Resources

These are my favorite companies to use when I travel. They consistently have the best deals, offer world-class customer service and great value, and overall, are better than their competitors. They are the companies I use the most and are always the starting point in my search for travel deals.

  • Skyscanner – Skyscanner is my favorite flight search engine. They search small websites and budget airlines that larger search sites tend to miss. They are hands down the number one place to start.
  • Hostelworld – This is the best hostel accommodation site out there with the largest inventory, best search interface, and widest availability.
  • Booking.com – The best all around booking site that constantly provides the cheapest and lowest rates. They have the widest selection of budget accommodation. In all my tests, they’ve always had the cheapest rates out of all the booking websites.
  • HostelPass – This new card gives you up to 20% off hostels throughout Europe. It’s a great way to save money. They’re constantly adding new hostels too. I’ve always wanted something like this and glad it finallt exists.
  • Get Your Guide – Get Your Guide is a huge online marketplace for tours and excursions. They have tons of tour options available in cities all around the world, including everything from cooking classes, walking tours, street art lessons, and more!
  • The Man in Seat 61 – This website is the ultimate guide to train travel anywhere in the world. They have the most comprehensive information on routes, times, prices, and train conditions. If you are planning a long train journey or some epic train trip, consult this site.
  • Rome2Rio – This website allows you to see how to get from point A to point B the best and cheapest way possible. It will give you all the bus, train, plane, or boat routes that can get you there as well as how much they cost.
  • FlixBus – Flixbus has routes between 20 European countries with prices starting as low 5 EUR! Their buses include WiFi, electrical outlets, a free checked bag.
  • SafetyWing – Safety Wing offers convenient and affordable plans tailored to digital nomads and long-term travelers. They have cheap monthly plans, great customer service, and an easy-to-use claims process that makes it perfect for those on the road.
  • LifeStraw – My go-to company for reusable water bottles with built-in filters so you can ensure your drinking water is always clean and safe.
  • Unbound Merino – They make lightweight, durable, easy-to-clean travel clothing.
  • Top Travel Credit Cards – Points are the best way to cut down travel expenses. Here’s my favorite point earning credit cards so you can get free travel!

Finland Travel Guide: Related Articles

Want more info? Check out all the articles I’ve written on backpacking/traveling Finland and continue planning your trip:

The 5 Best Hostels in Helsinki

The 5 Best Hostels in Helsinki

The 20 Best Things to See and Do in Helsinki

The 20 Best Things to See and Do in Helsinki

How to Spend Three Days in Helsinki

How to Spend Three Days in Helsinki

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  • Where To Stay
  • Transportation
  • Booking Resources
  • Related Blogs

Travel Cost Calculator

Finland travel cost calculator.

How much does a trip to Finland cost? How much money do I need per day in Helsinki or Lapland?

Our online travel cost calculator helps you plan travel expenses including hotel costs, attractions, transportation and dining.

This free tool is for any traveler who simply wants to figure out a budget for a trip to Finland.

Choose your destination, number of travelers, travel month, your preferences, and the tool provides a rough estimate for you to see if these costs meet your budget or when to go to Finland for cheaper rates.

Prices are shown in Euro (€) and U.S. dollars (US$) to make the calculations easier to use.

How do we calculate your travel costs?

Accommodation rates are based on average rates for a standard double/twin room for two adults. The peak and off – season rates are taken into account. Shoulder season rates and holidays are not included in the estimate. Accommodation rates may vary greatly depending on how far in advance you book, cancellation policies, special offers and deals, etc. The hotel prices we’ve collected are all well-rated hotels in the popular tourist areas in Finland.

Transportation prices:

  • Public transport: 24-hour pass or 4 single/one-way tickets per person per day
  • A 10 km (7 miles) taxi ride in a city center
  • Midsize car rental. A car hire cost is calculated per day, so it might be a lot cheaper to rent by a week or two weeks. SCDW insurance is not included in the estimate

Food prices:

  • Cheap eats: street food, fast food, e.g. Big Mac & Coke for a lunch
  • Mid-range cafes and restaurants: a set lunch menu or a one main meal + dessert + coffee for a lunch; 2-course dinner without drinks
  • Fine dining: breakfast and lunch in mid – range cafes and restaurants; dinner: Tasting Menu without wine
  • 1 alcohol drink: a glass of wine or beer
  • 3 drinks: a glass of wine, beer and cocktail

Attractions :

  • Two attraction tickets listed in “Things to Do”
  • Two popular attraction tickets and one tour

Unexpected travel expenses such as tips, souvenirs, a bottle of water, etc.

Average Travel Costs

The average price of a 7-day trip to Finland in July is US$1313 | €1190 for a solo traveler, US$1483 | €1344 for a couple. Off-season travel may be up to 48 % cheaper. The average cost of a 7-day trip to Finland during off-season is US$677 | €613 for a solo traveler, US$847 | €767 for a couple.

Hotels range from US$76 - 387 | €69 - 351 per night with an average of US$127 | €115. Travelers spend on average US$71 | €64 on meals per person per day in Finland. 1 day in Helsinki will cost you US$195 | €177.

Things to Do

Ferry Prices

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Budget Travel Ideas , Europe , FINLAND , Western Europe

How much does a trip to finland cost.

How Much Does a Trip to Finland Cost

It’s no surprise to learn that Finland does not account for the cheapest trip I’ve ever taken!

Yes, being situated in Scandinavia – a region known for its high cost of living – it’s fair to say Finland isn’t a country usually associated with budget travel.

In fact, this is probably why it’s only recently that I’ve first stepped foot there!

But having now visited, I have to say Finland was actually not as expensive as I thought.

Yes, much to my pleasant surprise, my week-long trip to Finland was not quite as astronomically costly as I imagined!

To be fair I had feared the worst, but actually, Finland is widely thought to be the most affordable of the Nordic nations and, in my experience, it didn’t reach far beyond the average western Europe trip budget.

So if you’ve been put off visiting Finland through fear of the costs, think again!

This post is going to bring up the full lowdown on just how much a trip to Finland costs… and you might be surprised by the results too!

Related Posts

  • 15 Things to Know When you Travel Finland
  • How to Plan the Best Christmas Trip to Lapland
  • Ultimate Winter Finland Packing List

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Prices and info are correct at time of writing.

Intro to this Finland Trip Budget

Finland, Lapland Winter, Me

The first thing I’d encourage you to do is head over to my Finland itinerary post – check out that 1 week plan and then come back here!

To give you some idea of prices, I’m going to cost out that specific itinerary, so you get some handle on what a Finland trip budget might look like in real terms.

This cost-covering post will be based on that trip, the one I did, staying in the same places, enjoying the same activities and getting around in the same ways.

Obviously, this will involve travelling on a budget as much as possible, i.e. utilising Airbnbs, local guesthouses and small-scale activity providers to try and keep the costs down.

That said, it will include a few splurges, that wouldn’t be considered budget travel items ordinarily, but which in Finland are well worth the expense.

As I’ve pointed out, travel here is never going to be ultra-cheap, but if you head to this country and miss out on a few key experiences that you likely have on your Finland bucket list, then you will be doing your trip here a major disservice. After all, isn’t part of travel always about spending a bit to see and experience a country’s best?

In my mind, this is certainly true, which is why I’ve included things like a stay in a glass igloo, a husky ride and a northern lights tour in this budget outline.

This budget will also include domestic flights, because again while taking the train to Lapland can be a cheaper option, for many budget travellers, time is still of the essence and their priority is seeing Finland in a week.

Worth pointing out too is that this budget does not include international flights, any visa expenses or insurance costs, so don’t forget to factor those in as well.

First up, I’m going to give you a breakdown of each category so that, if you are travelling to Finland for longer than a week, or with a bit more / less cash, you can do your own workings.

Then, at the end of this post, you’ll find the complete budget breakdown of my proposed 1 week Finland itinerary to let you know exactly how much to set aside for your trip.

Hope this all helps and that you have a wonderful time travelling in this country too!

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#1 Accommodation

Finland, Lapland Winter, Glass Igloo

Accommodation costs aren’t cheap in Finland, primarily because rents aren’t cheap here and neither is the cost of living.

What this means is that, while there are a few hostels in Finland, the vast majority of affordable accommodation comes in the form of hotels, guesthouse rooms or Airbnbs.

There are hostels in both Helsinki and the main Lapland town of Rovaniemi, as well as other major cities such as Turku.

In Helsinki, beds in hostel dorms start at around €25, whilst private rooms begin at around €50. My pick in this city is The Yard Hostel .

In Lapland (which is always more expensive), dorms start at around €40 and private rooms from €100! In Rovaniemi, my pick of the bunch is Hostel Cafe Koti .

Given these rates, if you’re travelling as a couple, a pair or a family, a basic hotel or guesthouse might suit you better.

Standard double or twin rooms (including breakfast) begin from €120 – €150 in Helsinki. Check out Hotel F6 or Hotel Helka as 2 top-rated options in the city centre.

Or otherwise, Airbnb apartments in the capital can be picked up for around €100 –  a real bargain as these studio spaces often sleep up to 4 people and include a kitchen space so you can prepare your own simple meals.

Check out my list of the top 10 Airbnbs in Helsinki for more ideas.

At the other extreme of the country and price range, luxury stays in Lapland can be up to €500 a night, like this amazing Glass Resort , which offers premium glass apartments with saunas and hot tubs.

And in the high winter season, they can be even more – especially in the pre-Christmas, December lead-up.

For something more reasonable, middle-range guesthouses and hotels can be found in Lapland’s main tourism town of Rovaniemi for around €170 a night, like a family room in Wherever Mini Hotel .

Otherwise, self-catering accommodation in Rovaniemi can be found for around €140 – see this Arctic Circle Home which sleeps 2.

Alternatively, you can look to get off the beaten track a bit – which gets my vote every time! – and head out of the main Lapland resort areas for some better prices.

Ranua, just an hour from Rovaniemi, is a very lovely, local Finnish town and here the Arctic Guesthouse and Igloos provides single rooms from €65 a night, double rooms from €80 a night and superb AuroraHut glass igloo pods from €220 a night.

Learn more about my stay in an AuroraHut glass igloo pod here .

#2 Transport

Lapland, Rovaniemi, Flight

Transport fees can make a huge difference when it comes to the cost of travelling in Finland, and they largely depend on how much time you have in the country and how much you want to see.

What I mean by this is, if you want to whizz around Finland and experience both the capital of Helsinki and Lapland in a week, you’re very likely to fly.

If you’ve got longer or are up for an adventure, you can take the night train to Lapland from Helsinki or even hire a car and drive… stopping at the Finnish Lakes on the way.

As a guide, a return flight between Helsinki and Rovaniemi may cost you around €160. These flights are operated by Finnair and the prices I quote include checked luggage, so you can save more by opting for a carry-on only.

As always, I use Skyscanner to get the best rates on plane tickets.

If you want to take the train between Helsinki and Lapland, the best option is the overnight Santa Claus Express direct train, where cabin prices begin at €160.

Learn more about all the options for travelling between Helsinki and Lapland in this article I wrote.

In terms of short-distance transport in Finland, Uber is available in Helsinki and it will cost you around €40 to get from the airport to the centre of the city – to be fair this is quite a long distance.

Alternatively, you can buy a public transport card to navigate this journey. A single journey costs around €5, or you can get a day or multi-day pass, which is a much more affordable option if you’re in Helsinki for 1-3 days and plan to use the buses and trams.

These passes work using a zone system and, while the city centre is in Zone A, the airport is in Zone C. This means you’ll need a card that works across Zone ABC for travel to and from the airport as well as downtown. This costs around €20. Learn more here

Bike-sharing or scooter-sharing schemes can also be found in Finland if you prefer to travel small distances this way.

Otherwise, for car hire in Finland, you’re looking at around €170 for 6 days, plus the price of fuel of course. If you’re travelling as a group, you can split the costs of this.

Another top tip is not to hire a car until you’re leaving Helsinki – this will keep the number of days you require a vehicle to a minimum, as you really don’t need one in the capital.

#3 Tours & Activities

Finland, Lapland Winter, Huskies

And coming in at number 3, it’s another big ticket item in Finland, namely tours and activities.

This is where your budget can really spiral if you’re not careful.

In Helsinki, you don’t really need to take any tours if you don’t want to.

It’s only the cost of entrances to any museums or galleries etc that you’ll need to pay – most are about 12-15€ per adult.

In addition, many of the main Cathedrals and religious buildings in the capital cost around 5€ to enter.

If you plan to do a lot of sightseeing in Helsinki, it may prove more cost-effective to buy a Helsinki City Card .

However, in Lapland, it’s really all about enjoying at least a few amazing excursions, even if you’re budget is small. Honestly, they really are worth the splurge in my book, otherwise you’re not going to do this incredible place justice in my opinion.

You can learn more about my fave Lapland activities in this post about the best things to do in Lapland , but in general, you’re looking at between €90-120 per person for top Northern Lights or Husky Sledding tours.

Options for snowshoeing, hiking and snow sculpture activities usually cost a bit less.

Check out these top picks for more ideas…

  • Icebreaker Cruise with Lunch and Ice Floating from Rovaniemi
  • Snowmobile Safari to the Wilderness with Lunch
  • Ranua Wildlife Park Guided Tour
  • Apukka Husky Adventure from Rovaniemi
  • Northern Lights Wilderness Tour with Camera

Thankfully, seeing Santa can be done at his official home in Rovaniemi for free.

Learn more of my top tips for how to holiday in Lapland for less here .

#4 Food & Drink

Finland, Lapland, Fire Pit

Thankfully, following on from the activities section, food and drink in Finland is not as crazily priced. And while not cheap, I didn’t find it that different from my eating and drinking costs at home in London.

Of course, this doesn’t include fine dining options, but in general, a coffee in a local café will cost you around €3.50 and a pizza in a casual restaurant around €15-20.

Staying somewhere that offers breakfast, or has a small kitchen, so you can pop to the supermarket for a few bits, is a good way to save money here.

A casual sandwich and drink type lunch in a café is likely to be around €15-20 and dinner out with a glass of local beer around €30.

It’s once you start adding more drinks or imported alcohol, such as wine or spirits, that things get very expensive in Finland. The tax on alcohol here is high and for a Finnish beer in a local bar you’re looking at €5-10. Wine is around €10-15 a glass and, of course, cocktails even higher.

Limiting how much alcohol you drink in Finland is an easy way to keep the budget under control, but if you do drink and still want to keep your budget low, buy alcohol from the supermarket (or duty-free on the way here) to enjoy in your accommodation, or stick to 1-2 drinks of local alcohol (try Lapland lager!) in smaller local bars.

This means you should be able to get by on around €60 a day when it comes to eating and drinking – it just depends how much and in what quantities you like doing that stuff!

#5 Other Expenses

Finland, Lapland Winter, Reindeer

Then you’ve got to factor in all those other expenses, like international flights, visa costs (Finland is part of the EU, so this should help you work out whether you need to pay anything or not), laundry (once a week should do it) and possibly insurance, plus a SIM and data package too.

finland tour budget

Alternatively, if you’re a long-term traveller, digital nomad or frequent remote worker seeking travel health cover, check out Safetywing’s Nomad Insurance policies.

You’ll find these costs have a sneaky way of really adding up, so shouldn’t be forgotten about as part of your budget either!

Final Budget Breakdown

Finland, Lapland, Inside Glass Igloo

And here it is, the complete per person breakdown of what it costs to travel in Finland for 1 week on a mid-range budget….ish!

  • 7 Nights Accommodation in a Standard Double Room (based on an average of €120 per night, divided by 2 people) – €420
  • Return Flights to Lapland from Helsinki – €160
  • 3 Day Public Transport Card for Helsinki – €20
  • Helsinki Museums & Attractions – €30
  • 3-4 Lapland Activities – €350
  • 7 Days of Food and Drink – €420

Total – €1400

Finland, Lapland, Ranua Wildlife Park

I hope you’ve found this article about how much it costs to travel in Finland useful and that you can use a few of the budget travel hacks I’ve given out too.

Is the total figure more or less than you expected?

I’d love to know what you think and also how much you’ve budgeted for / spent on your Finland travels…

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How Much Does it Cost to Travel in Finland

Creator of Big World Small Pockets, Stephanie Parker is a travel addict! Originally from Jersey in the Channel Islands, Stephanie adventures the world collecting tips, advice and stories, to share with a smile

2 thoughts on “ How Much Does a Trip to Finland Cost? ”

finland tour budget

Thank you for the information!! Unfortunately, we will be traveling in the spring (though the northern lights is on my bucket-list), and only staying in Southern Finland, the information was incredible!!

finland tour budget

Ah thanks Carol, so happy to hear you found the info useful. Hope you enjoy your Spring time to Finland! Best, Steph 🙂

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Finland on budget: 17 easy tips to save money

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Great tips! I have heard that Finland can be quite expensive so knowing where to save and where to spend is always helpful.

Great tips! Never would have thought to eat in a Chinese restaurant to keep costs down, but it makes sense. I’ve only been to Helsinki for work, but I’d love to go back and see the far north. Thanks for the Murmansk tip; that never would have occurred to me!

Absolutely excellent tips you mentioned out there. It’s great to plan earlier and make a list of free things you can actually do there. Plus those Chinese lunches actually save dime. Prefer couchsurfing is also another tip I guess.

I would love to stay in wilderness cabins and in holiday villages not because it is cheap but because the experience would be unique and awesome! Also, I usually drink tap water, as long as it is safe to in a country. Good tip about the Chinese lunches and kebab places. Also, I didn’t know it’d be cheaper to get to Lapland via Russia!

I always like to travel cheap and you have a wonderful list. Totally agree with you travel in low season. Not only it can avoid the crowds and at the same time, we can enjoy a lot of peace. Most importantly plenty of photo opportunities without any human photo bombs.

This is definitely my next plan. Sticking to cycling and Northern lights on your own too. Finland was what I left the last time. These are some awesome tips Alex! Thank you. Saving this one?

This guide is helpful for newbies in Finland. I sure will make use of this tips if I ever make it to Finland.

Together with my husband, we often travel on a budget so your blog post is very helpful for us. A lot of clever tips. Thanks! We are going to Finland in the near future, so we will take advantage.

Great list and money saving tips. I do agree the travel cards are useful and there are some restaurants with some great food. Some museum cafe has some great buffet deals, too. And yes, if you spent more time on research it’s okay to hunt Northern lights by yourselves, but sometimes a guide make things easier in the cold @ knycx.journeying

I didn’t realise how expensive Finland can be. Good tip about visiting in late summer or early autumn, I love the colours of the leaves at that time. I love the idea of foraging, but watch out for poisonous mushrooms.

Great tips. I wish I saw your post before I visited few years ago. I would of saved a fortune

Some really interesting tips there. Lapland from Russia and cycling around sounds fun. The Northern lights photo looks great. I always prefer budget travel and hopefully I get to visit Finland.

I have never been to Finland. THerefore, this article will be a very helpful tool when I will be going there. What is the temperature now?

These are great budget-friendly tips! I am all about traveling the world with the cheapest bill and since Finland is on my bucket list, I will pin this post for when I plan that trip. Cheers!

Pink mushrooms tours and wilderness cabins?! I want to go now!!! These are great tips, thanks for sharing, I have been to all the countries around Finland apart from Finland so your tips will be proved very useful to me!

Thanks for sharing! I hadn’t considered going through Russia to access some parts of Finland to make things cheaper, but I’m going to look into it since it makes the transportation so much more affordable!

This is a great guide – however I’m shocked reading the prices: 48 Euro for a day card?!? Gosh, that’s pricey. However, the tip travelling to Lapland through Russia is great – on the other hand, I don’t need a visa for Finland… Anyway, like I said, the guide is really great and very, very helpful!

You missed saying eat wherever you see “seisovapoyta” means sitting table but really is a buffet lunch you can eat as much as you can includes non alcoholic drinks and bread, its very traditional Finnish and fixed price about 15 – 20 €

Hyvaa matkaa = have a good trip..

You can get as far as to Kolari by train. Kolari is about 160 km up north from Rovaniemi. I recommend taking a night train where you can get even your car on the same train. You’ll arrive rested and can continue your journey by car.

Helsinki metropolitan public transportation ticketing has changed since the blog was written. Prices are based on different zones and it is now more affordable to travel in the entire Helsinki area, including neighboring cities Espoo and Vantaa. You can also reach by public transportation some amazing forests in Helsinki area, check out Nuuksio and Haltia for example.

Eating a warm meal during lunch time is also recommended. Not only the Chinese restaurants, but virtually all restaurants have lunch deals from 10 – 12 euros.

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Is Finland Expensive? A Finland Trip Cost Guide

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finland tour budget

Is Finland expensive? If you’re thinking of planning a trip to Finland and are already aware of how expensive the Nordic region can be, it can be pretty disheartening if you have your sights set on a trip to Finland.

Despite high travel costs when visiting Finland, it is possible to visit on a tight budget and have an outstanding Finnish getaway. With the right planning, you’ll be able to make the most of every euro without breaking the bank while enjoying this outstanding country. 

Finland can be an expensive country to visit with an average cost of €85-320 per person per day. However, there are ways that you can save money in this gorgeous Nordic nation, as well.

This article will give you the best idea of an average Finland trip cost as well as how to maximise your budget while visiting the happiest country in the world.

Table of Contents

Finland Trip Cost Guide

Accommodation prices in finland .

Typically in most European countries, the high tourist season comes during the warm summer months, but in Finland, it’s the opposite, with the high season being the cold winter months.

Tourists typically flock to the Finnish capital of Helsinki and Aurora-studded Lapland in the wintertime to get the most out of what the country is known for.

You can expect accommodation in Finland to be a little more expensive in the wintertime, but in this guide, I’ve averaged both costs to give you a general idea of what to expect when paying for accommodation in Finland. 

Northern Lights in Finnish Lapland

Accommodation costs in the most visited areas of Finland (Helsinki and Finnish Lapland) are also a lot higher in comparison to less visited towns and regions in the country.

The most cost-efficient accommodation option when visiting Finland will undoubtedly be to book a bed at a hostel . On average throughout the country you can expect to pay around €35 per night , making it pretty on par with hostel bed costs in many other parts of Europe. 

If you’re looking to have more privacy and would like to stay in a mid-range hotel or private accommodation when staying in Finland, the average cost will be around €100 per night. Finally, for those looking to stay in a nicer hotel in Finland, the minimum anticipated cost per night is typically around €150 .

If you’re visiting Finnish Lapland in the winter and would like to stay in a hotel, expect the cheapest cost to be around €200 as demand is high especially during the high season.

Hostel options in Lapland and the capital city of Rovaniemi are limited but affordable, so book far in advance if you’re determined to save costs.

Santa Claus Village in Lapland

Transportation Prices in Finland 

While accommodation costs in Finland are rather expensive, transportation is quite reasonable and on par with the costs of its European neighbors. 

If you’re visiting the stylish capital city of Helsinki whether by a flight or via ferry from Estonia , you’re in luck if you’re visiting Finland on a budget as it’s quite compact, making it an incredibly walkable city for visitors and getting around is easy.

If you find yourself needing public transportation in Helsinki or other Finnish cities, a one-trip ticket on any aspect of the public transport system will cost €3.60 and a one-day pass comes out to €9.00 .

Other towns and cities in Finland such as Turku, Oulu, Rovaniemi, and Porvoo are also quite walkable and pleasant to experience by foot. 

Furthermore, if you plan on seeing more of the country than just Helsinki, a great option is to rent a car to save money on train transport and have the most flexibility during your Finland itinerary.

Renting a car in Finland in the summer months is more affordable than in winter months, at around €50 per day, and also a lot safer than driving in the winter. You can browse rental car options here.

This is just the basic fare and anything else including insurance, petrol costs, or snow chains will be added on top.

Finnish winter, especially in the northern part of the country, can be quite brutal and I recommend against renting a car for your trip during the winter months if you’re not a driver with experience driving in harsh weather conditions. 

Town of Porvoo

Food Prices in Finland

Unfortunately, food costs in Finland hit the higher mark along with accommodation costs. Restaurants in Finland tend to be pretty pricey with meal costs per person typically around €25. These prices are quite typical throughout the country regardless of the region you’re in, but outside of Helsinki and Rovaniemi, you may be able to find a meal a bit cheaper. 

On a positive note, there are affordable options if you’re visiting Finland on a budget and it is possible to find cheap eats during your stay. Ethnic food such as Asian or Middle Eastern is usually quite affordable no matter where you are in the world, and Finland is no exception.

This is typically an easier feat to find when in bigger cities such as Helsinki and Oulu, and you’ll be able to find a solid meal for around €15 .

Street-food markets are also great options to find delicious and more affordable food options. I highly recommend visiting the Old Market Hall in Helsinki if you’re looking for a quality meal bargain.

Traditional Finnish restaurants tend to be on the higher end of costs, so unfortunately, unless you’re able to dish out a large amount of money it’s hard to try traditional foods on a budget. If you’re determined to try traditional food in Finland, make a trip to the supermarket to try local specialties without spending too much.

Staying in an Airbnb with a kitchen is also a great bonus if you’re trying to save money during your trip as groceries in Finland are pretty economical and high quality. This way you’ll be able to cook meals as much as you’d like during your stay. Many hostels also offer breakfast (usually buffets), making it a great way to save a large chunk of money on a Finland trip cost. 

Finland also has a delicious and extensive breakfast and brunch culture offering multiple dishes inclusive of coffee/tea and juice with incredibly fresh and high-quality ingredients.

While these typically cost around €25 per person, it’s a great way to fuel up for the day with a delicious and nutritious breakfast. If you prefer to skip these set breakfasts, it’s also affordable (around €4 to get a local pastry for breakfast to further save on your Finland trip cost. 

Old Market Hall

Activities Prices in Finland

A major part of any trip to Finland but especially when traveling to Finnish Lapland is deciding which activities in Finland you’re interested in as well as which activities fit well into your Finland travel cost.

If you’re visiting Helsinki, there are a wide array of museums to visit of all sorts; from Finnish history to all different types of art galleries and museums.

Most museums in Helsinki as well as throughout the rest of the country typically average out around €15 , making it a relatively affordable way to explore Finnish culture and history.

If you’re traveling as a family with children, Finland is a solid destination as most museums offer free entry for those 18 and under. 

Of course, engaging in the typical Finnish experience of lounging in a sauna is another popular activity and this is also something that you can do somewhat affordably, depending on the type of experience you’re after.

Activity costs are a completely different field when visiting Rovaniemi and Finnish Lapland in the winter high season. While it is possible to have a fantastic trip to Finnish Lapland on a budget, unless you have a large amount of money to spend while visiting, it can become pretty limiting.

Activities in Lapland and out of Rovaniemi vary from husky-sled and reindeer tours to Northern Lights safaris , with these typically costing at a minimum of €100 per person . If visiting as a family or group, it can become pretty expensive quickly.

If you’re set on visiting Rovaniemi and Finnish Lapland, but are on a budget, one of the main attractions, Santa Claus Village is free to visit.

Santa Claus Village is a magical world in itself, with astonishing nature, winter/holiday fun, Santa visits and more affordable husky/reindeer rides, and enough sites within the village to visit over multiple days. 

Walking tours are quite popular in Helsinki and you can find a wide variety of different free walking tours (with a small tip expected), as well as paid walking tours for around €50. This is a great way to acquaint yourself well with the area with a local guide without having to spend much money at different museums and points throughout the city.

Local tour guides also have a lot of insight and interesting facts about Finland and Finnish culture to share that you probably wouldn’t know or learn otherwise, so I extremely recommend getting to know the country with a local guide!

Most historic sites in Finland such as city cathedrals and historic monuments such as Suomenlinna Fortress are also free to visit, keeping Finland activity costs low for those sticking to a tight travel budget.

If you’re a nature seeker and tend to find yourself on the hunt for the best outdoor spots on your travels, Finland is Europe’s most forested country as well as one rich in many deep blue lakes, national parks, unique wildlife, and breezy Baltic islands.

Finland is a country of free-roaming and  “everyman’s land”, meaning that anyone living or visiting Finland has free rights to roam, forage, and fish any public and recreational land in the country.

This makes this nordic country an idyllic destination if you’re a lover of the natural world and also looking to cut down on your trip to Finland cost. 

Husky sledding in Lapland

Entertainment Prices in Finland

Similar to food costs in Finland, coffee and alcohol costs are both pretty high in comparison to other parts of Europe and the world.

If you’re keen on trying local beers and wine during your time in Finland, it’s safe to say that you should expect to pay an average of €7 for a pint of beer and about €8 for a glass of wine in Finland . This is on the low end, as in restaurants you’ll typically pay a bit more in comparison to a designated pub or bar. 

The Finnish have a really large and thriving coffee and cafe culture, making it a great spot to visit if you love trying local coffees and having local spots to caffeinate up during a Finnish adventure.

Coffee costs aren’t too high but are on par with costs throughout a lot of Europe with a cappuccino costing around €4 and a hot brewed coffee around €3 .

The arts are a deep part of Finnish culture and identity, and this is well reflected in the Kalevala, Finland’s national epic, highlighting the national struggle during Finnish independence as well as the beautiful Suomi language.

Because of this history, Finland has a wonderful opera and theater scene and it’s a wonderful way to get to know Finnish culture, history, and the importance of how they tie together.

Costs for opera/theater or ballet shows vary depending on the seats you purchase but for a pretty good seat, the average cost is around €40 per ticket. 

The Suomenlinna Fortress

Is Finland Expensive? Average Prices in Finland 

So overall, how expensive is Finland? Finland isn’t a destination suited for budget travelers and backpackers, but with focused planning and organising of your trip, it’s possible to enjoy a budget trip to this lush and interesting country.

Accommodation : €35-100 / night

Transportation : €10-40 / day

Food : €15-40 / day

Activities : €15-100 / day

Entertainment : €10-40 / day

Above you’ll see the most relevant individual costs (assuming costs are split between two people) that make up a Finland travel cost from the low-end to the high-end. On average a trip to Finland per day you should expect to pay between €85-320 per person .

This won’t include any pre-trip expenses such as flights or travel insurance.

You’ll notice that there’s quite a wide range, indicating that Finland is a destination manageable on most budgets, whether you’re a budget traveler or a luxury seeker.

If you stay in affordable accommodation, walk as much as you can while visiting cities and towns, take advantage of free walking tours, seek affordable meals, and skip pricey sit-down restaurants, you’ll manage to make the most of every euro when you travel to Finland. 

Summer in Helsinki

Due to the high costs in Finland, it may seem close to impossible to enjoy a trip to the beautiful Nordic country without having a lot of money to put towards a trip. But with the right planning of your time and money, Finland on a budget is certainly possible, still offering you an unforgettable adventure. 

Are you planning a trip to Finland? Have any questions about expenses? Let us know in the comments!

finland tour budget

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About Olivia Ellis

Olivia is a writer for The World Was Here First. Originally from Michigan, USA, she is currently living in Athens, Greece exploring Europe and filmmaking. When she’s not travelling or writing, Olivia can be found cooking delicious new recipes from around the world, reading, and spending time outdoors.

I’m a reasonably fit 72 year old living in Edinburgh. I plan to combine a 2/3 day visit to Helsinki with a 4/5 day visit to Tallinn Estonia in late April or early May. I thought the best way would be to fly to Helsinki, spend some time there then get the ferry to Tallinn for a few days. Ferry back to Helsinki then fly home. There is a direct flight between Edinburgh and Helsinki. I wonder are there ticket concessions for those of my age.

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How Much Does Finland Travel Cost? Here Is A Breakdown

Some say that a holiday experience in Finland is priceless – there is nothing like watching the Northern Lights and hanging out with huskies and reindeers. No matter how much you budget for your Finland trip, you will not be disappointed by the beauty of being in the Finnish wilderness. Aside from flights, your Finland travel cost will depend on the type of activities and accommodation you like.

Although you can engage a tour company to arrange this once-in-a-lifetime trip, there are many perks of traveling to Finland without a tour. For example, you get to choose your own hotels and switch up the dining options. If you are trying to plan a DIY trip, this will give you an idea of travel cost in Finland and how much to prepare.

Finland Travel Cost Overview

Flights to and within finland, buses and private transfers in lapland, public transportation and taxis in helsinki, hotel and resort accommodations, seasonal activities, dining and shopping, miscellaneous expenses, travel insurance, putting it together, how much does finland travel cost.

So how much does Finland travel cost? The average travel expense can range anywhere from 3,500 € to 7,500 € , though it largely depends on your travel style.

This is what you might expect for a 1-week Lapland road trip and 3 days spent in Helsinki during winter. We estimated it based on a mix of hotel accommodations and popular activities including husky and reindeer safari.

Read on for a breakdown of the different aspects of Finland’s travel costs, along with some suggested things to do and places to go in Finland.

Pie Chart showing Finland travel cost by expense type

First things first, we need to fly to Finland. Finnair is the national carrier of Finland and they fly to most major cities. Here are the estimated flight costs for return economy flights between Helsinki and various cities.

  • Singapore to Helsinki: 1,075 €
  • Delhi to Helsinki: 800 €
  • New York to Helsinki: 635 €
  • London to Helsinki: 260 €

Flights make a huge part of Finland travel cost

The easiest and quickest way is to get to Lapland is via a domestic flight from Helsinki to any of the airports further north. If you want to visit Santa Claus Village you should fly to Rovaniemi, the capital of Lapland. To get to northern Lapland, you can fly to Ivalo or Kittila. These are the nearest airports for the popular ski resort towns of Saariselka and Levi.

Note that domestic flight schedules might change after the winter season is over, so do check them before confirming any plans. You can consider doing multi-city flights to cover more destinations. Check out some one-way domestic flight prices below.

  • Helsinki to Rovaniemi: 85 €
  • Helsinki to Ivalo: 80 €
  • Helsinki to Kittila: 80 €

Let’s assume you’re flying from Singapore to Helsinki. After including a multi-city flight journey from Helsinki to Ivalo and then back to Helsinki from Rovaniemi, it will cost about 1,240 €.

You can easily rent a car in Finland from any of the airports. Simply search and book them online via a car rental site like RentalCars . On average, car rental in Finland will cost around 75 € to 90 € per day depending on the model. There are some additional costs to be mindful of as well:

  • Rental insurance (15 € per day)
  • Additional driver fee (9 € per day)
  • Winter tyre fee (50 €)
  • Cross-border fee (150 €)
  • One-way charge (65 €)

It is a good idea to take pictures or videos of the car at the start and end of the rental. Do look out for any existing scratches, dents, or other damage, so that you can provide evidence when disputing a charge.

If your fuel policy is like-for-like, it means that you will need to return the car with the same amount of fuel. You can estimate your fuel usage cost based on the expected driving distance. For reference, we covered roughly 1,200 km with 62 litres of fuel. It cost 130 € in total with fuel prices at 2.1 € per litre.

For a 1-week road trip, you might pay around 730 €, including insurance and fuel.

Car rental as part of Finland travel cost

If you are not planning to rent a car, you can opt for the scheduled buses that run between cities in Lapland. Although timetable and prices might change with the season, you can easily check them on Omnibus or Matkahuolto . Here are examples of some routes you can consider.

  • Rovaniemi to Ivalo (4hr 40min): 45.90 €
  • Rovaniemi to Levi (2hr 55min): 28.90 €
  • Rovaniemi to Pyhatunturi (2hr): 33 €
  • Rovaniemi to Kemi (1hr 30min): 5.90 €
  • Helsinki to Rovaniemi (11hr 20min): 29.90 €

Many hotels and resorts also offer airport transfer services, with prices varying with the distance to the nearest airport. For example, it costs 18 € for a 15-minute transfer from Kittila Airport to Levi Inglut. You will need to inform them about your arrival in advance so that they have time to prepare. Sometimes, there are complimentary shuttle services between the accommodation and the airport so you can also look out for that.

Renting a car tends to make more sense if you want to have flexibility to travel at your own time and pace.

Grand Central Station in Helsinki

For city sight-seeing in Helsinki, you can get a Day Ticket that allows you to transfer between modes of public transport (trams, buses, etc.). This is valid within your selected travel zone for the purchased duration. On the other hand, a Single Ticket is usually more suitable for a one-way trip.

Travel zones A and B cover most of the attractions in Helsinki city center. If you want to include Helsinki Airport, you will need to buy a ticket that covers zone C as well. The easiest way to purchase these tickets is through the HSL app or at any R-Kioski convenience stores.

  • Day Ticket AB (1/2/3 days): 8/12/16 €
  • Day Ticket ABC (1/2/3 days): 11/16.50/22 €
  • Single Ticket AB: 2.80 €
  • Single Ticket ABC: 4.10 €

Although there is train service between the Airport to the city center, you might want to hop on a taxi for convenience which costs around 40 € to 50 €.

If you get the Day Ticket ABC for all 3 days, public transportation in Helsinki will cost around 22 €.

Santa Claus Holiday Village in autumn

The price of hotels and resorts vary a lot based on the time of year. I have an article about the best glass igloos in Finland that also includes the expected prices for different seasons. We found that the cost of these glass igloos hotels is generally discounted by around 50% during the off-peak period in summer and autumn. If you are trying to save money, you can consider travelling during September to enjoy hiking and ruska (autumn foliage) instead.

There are many types of accommodations to choose from – cabins, hostels, resorts, glass igloos, snow hotels, and more. In winter, a typical hotel in Lapland costs 150 € per night, and something more popular like the Santa Claus Holiday Village costs 180 € per night. For an unforgettable experience, a stay in the best glass igloos cost 700 € per night. Something in a good location in Helsinki city center, like Scandic Grand Central Helsinki , goes for 170 € per night.

For a 10 day trip, if you splurge 2 out of 9 nights on a glass igloo stay, you will spend around 2,650 € on accommodations. That will be 1,325 € per person, assuming the room is shared.

Summer and autumn are the seasons where there are many free activities – such as hiking and berry picking. You can also go on your own Northern Lights chasing adventure. The weather conditions are mild and very pleasant for enjoying the outdoors. You can check out this blog post for an autumn road trip itinerary .

Reindeer sleigh, one of the must-do activities that will add to your Finland travel cost

Winter activities are the highlight of a Finland trip and you are encouraged to book your activities in advance as slots can run out. You can browse various combinations of activities through companies like Lapland Safaris and Husky & Co . Your resort can also help you with arranging a winter expedition and they usually have a brochure of activities on their website. You can also pick up equipment from any gear rental shops in the ski towns.

Here are some of the many winter activities in Finland with an approximated price per person (varies with region).

  • Husky sled safari (185 € for 10km)
  • Reindeer sleigh safari (150 € for 2 hours)
  • Horseback rides (150 € for 2 hours)
  • Snowmobile rides (150 € for 4 hours)
  • Skiing, snowboarding (50 € for 1 day)
  • Guided cross-country skiing and snowshoeing (75 € for 2 hours)
  • Ice fishing via snowmobile (170 € for 4 hours)
  • Kemi Icebreaker cruise (285 € for 3 hour including ice swimming)
  • Northern Lights chasing tour (90 € for 3 hours)
  • Tour to Snow Village where they have various ice sculptures and ice hotels (80 €)

I would say husky and reindeer safaris are a must, and it would be cool to explore the ice hotels in the Snow Village. Throw a couple of these activities together and it should add around 900 € to each person’s Finland travel cost.

Finland food

It’s not a surprise that dining in Finland can get expensive. In Lapland restaurants, you can get a set menu course at around 70 €, with the option to add on a wine tasting package. You should definitely try some reindeer meat or fresh trout during your trip. Besides that, the average meal costs anywhere from 15 € to 30 €.

Nili Restaurant or Gustavo are great choices for dinner when you are in Rovaniemi. In Helsinki, the Old Market Hall is known for tasty salmon soup and seafood sandwich, which you can try during lunch. After a week of Lappish cuisine, we turned to Hawaiian-Asian fusion dining at Restaurant HOKU after we came back to Helsinki. I also recommend trying the Cinnabon buns from Regatta cafe and hot chocolate from Fazer cafe .

inside CAMU, an outdoor store

If you want to shop for sports and outdoor equipment, you can check out CAMU and XXL Sports & Outdoor Kluuvi in Helsinki. You can also go to the Academic Bookstore to find this adorable book called Finnish Nightmares which describes Finnish culture in a comical way. If you want to buy luxury watches, you can drop by Lindroos , with outlets in both Helsinki city center and the airport. Don’t forget to get your Global Blue tax refund!

There are several unique things that characterise Finland, and you can bring these back home as souvenirs.

  • Handcrafted wooden items like Kuksa, a handmade birch cup
  • Finnish liquor
  • Fazer chocolates

Trout caviar from Old Market

Shopping expenses are totally up to you, so I will just estimate the dining costs to be 80 € per day on average. For our example, 10 days would require a 800 € food budget.

Here are examples of other miscellaneous expenses to account for in your Finland travel cost.

  • Private sauna or jacuzzi rental (for example, rental for both sauna and jacuzzi costs 99 € for 1.5 hours in Pyha Igloos )
  • Museum tickets ( Culture Pass to the 3 main museums in Rovaniemi costs 20 €)
  • Other attraction tickets (for example, Temppeliaukion Church entrance fee costs 5 €)
  • SIM Card for mobile connectivity (14 days of unlimited 4G and calls costs 14.90 €, can be bought at any R-Kioski convenience store)

You will have to add around 100 € per person for miscellaneous expenses.

Remember to get adequate travel insurance as you head out into the Finnish wilderness. The outdoor activities come with risks, and you want to have peace of mind as you travel.

You can also consider a policy that reimburses you for trip cancellations or postponements, since many of the tour companies and hotels require you to make a deposit or upfront payment.

Lastly, as travel volume surges during the holidays and operations get messy in the airport, you will appreciate receiving at least some compensation for travel delays and baggage mishandling.

Depending on your requirements, it might cost around 100 € to cover 10 days of travel.

Let’s sum it up now that we have gone through the full breakdown of expenses. How much does it cost to travel to Finland?

  • Flights: 1,240 €
  • Transportation: 752 €
  • Activities: 900 €
  • Food: 800 €
  • Accommodation: 1,325 €
  • Miscellaneous: 100 €
  • Insurance: 100 €

For this example of a 1 week road trip and 3 days in Helsinki (total of 10 days), it is estimated to cost 5,217 € in total per person.

I hope you found this informative and all the best with planning your Finland trip. It’s going to be a blast!

Subscribe to my mailing list to get updated on new posts and ideas like this one. You can also share this post on Facebook or save to Pinterest for future reference.

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How Much Does a Trip to Finland Cost?

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Posted by Kornelija Kadyte   |  April 25, 2019

Finland – the land of lakes and snow, home for Santa Claus and its reindeers, a place where you can enjoy the famous Finnish sauna, admire unforgettable Northern Lights, discover charming villages and modern cities. It is a truly great country to visit and spend your vacation in, but not necessarily the cheapest one. Finland, and especially its capital Helsinki, constantly ranks in the lists of the most expensive places. For example, in 2018, Helsinki was in 30th place in “The most expensive places to travel in the world” with a travel cost of 199.77 euros based on the average hotel, food, drink, taxi, and entertainment costs for one person per night. However, this does not deter Finland from making it to other lists, such as “Best quality of life” or “The happiest countries,” which only shows that Finland most definitely has to be on your personal “places to visit” list! But let’s dig into more details and find out what the price of a trip to Finland would be.

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Average Travel Cost in Finland

For the average travel cost, let’s take an example of Helsinki. Although keep in mind that even if the prices and cost of living are almost the same in the whole country, in the capital of the country, it is comparatively the highest. You can expect slightly lower prices in smaller cities in Finland.

And now, let’s answer one of the most important questions when going on vacation: “how much will I spend?” On average, the price of a trip to Finland would be 121€ or 138$ a day.

Here is a more detailed list of common expenses:

  • Price of a simple meal: ~11€/12.5$
  • Price of dinner: ~30€/34$
  • Price of a city sightseeing Hop on – Hop off bus tour: 30€/34$
  • Price of a city tour: usually from ~20€/23$ for a classic tour in the city center to ~80€/90$ for a longer day tour with a boat.
  • Price of a daily transportation card in Helsinki: 9€/10$
  • Price of TOP 10 Helsinki attractions: €194/220$
  • Price of a 3-day Helsinki Card: €71/80$
  • Price of accommodation: hostels from 25€/30$ a night, mid-range hotels from 80€/91$ a night, top-end hotels from 150€/171$ a night
  • Price of car hire: €40–50/45.5-57$ per day
  • Price of a taxi across town: €20–30/23-34$

fin11

Budget Trip Cost to Finland

The cheapest hostel in Helsinki would cost around 16€/18$ for a night. This price is for one bed in a shared bedroom with shared bathrooms. The cheapest options for a private room with a private bathroom would cost around 40€/45.5$ for one night.

The good news is that we are living in very hospitable times! There are several pages that would help budget travelers a lot:

  • www.homeexchange.com – signing up here is free and allows you to stay everywhere in the world for 133€/$150 a year or 13€/$15 a night. With home exchange, you will have the chance to share a more authentic experience while discovering the culture of your hosts.
  • www.couchsurfing.com – there are 243 very active users that are accepting guests in Helsinki all the time and over 17,000 hosts in this city in total. This means 17,000 possibilities to meet a real local and of course, stay for free. The numbers are huge which only shows how friendly, open-minded, and hospitable the country is!

If you are planning a budget trip to Finland, you are probably extremely interested in free things to do there.

First of all, all the natural parks, gardens lakes, and other nature sites are free because of jokamiehen oikeudet (every man’s rights), which means that every person has the right to travel in nature regardless of who owns the land. You can go to Aland – with 6700 named islands and 20000 smaller islands, this archipelago turns into one of the most spectacular places in Finland. Also, you can visit Lapland, enjoy lots of snow, breathtaking nature and most importantly – Northern Lights. It is one of the most popular and worth seeing things in Finland and it’s completely free to do: you don’t need any special tours, just head outside, somewhere a little away from big light sources.

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If you are more interested in culture than in nature, Helsinki always has some museums and other interesting places with free entrance to offer: Helsinki city museum, Finnish museums of Natural History (free every first Friday of the month), Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art (free every first Friday of the month), National Museum of Finland (free every first Friday of the month), the famous Suomenlinna sea fortress, Seurasaari open-air museum, Tram museum.

To sum up, if you are planning a luxury vacation in Finland, you might spend a little more than in other European countries, especially for accommodation, food, and drinks. But on the other hand, Finland is full of beautiful nature, free museums, and budget-friendly tours and activities, which would not make the cost of travel very frightening. Note: Information provided is based on 2019 data; future readers, be aware of potential changes.

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Iveta Gruodyte

Iveta Gruodytė

E-mail: [email protected]

Tel. +370 698 45681

Professionally educated in sports and tourism management, Iveta is passionate about encouraging guests to explore the Northeastern region of Europe in the most attractive way. She has been working in the tourism industry since 2013, assisting customers from 64 countries, and she loves doing it!

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Budget Finland Travel Guide 8 Ways to Save More Money

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Last updated on September 24th, 2023 at 11:59 pm

Table of Contents

The Budget Finland Travel Guide includes 18 Important Travel Planning Tips that will allow you to see and do more on your budget. Learn how you can benefit.

Welcome to the Finland Travel Guide! If you are one of those people who truly loves exploring the great outdoors then Finland must rank among the finest countries in Europe to visit. From the natural splendor of the Northern Lights and Hossa National Park through to the buzzing culture of big city Helsinki, you’ll have no difficulty filling up your itinerary whichever way you turn.

Make no mistake – there is a huge amount to see in this splendid country and you’ll be surprised that a country famed for its wilderness has so much unexpected diversity, and a cultural history steeped in an age-old tradition.

Finland may be a little off the ‘beaten path’ for many visitors to Europe, and perhaps that explains why the country remains so unspoiled and unique. Thanks to the convenience offered from a modern transit network and a bewildering ability for keeping trains running on time to the minute in blizzard conditions, Finland is surprisingly easy to explore. Those who do opt to explore something a little different are going to be guaranteed a quite unique experience that may well prove the most memorable of any European tour.

What Are the Best Places to Visit in Finland?

Lapland is far more than the home of Santa Claus (‘Joulupukki’ in Finnish) and while you’ll find no shortage of opportunities for photos with the great man, most visitors will be looking to enjoy some of the most staggeringly beautiful sub-arctic wilderness in the world. As you may expect the majority of activities throughout the region focus on the outdoors – and we’re talking way more than your typical snowsports. Reindeer and dog sleigh tours are fantastic ways of experiencing this side of the country (and don’t worry – the animals are magnificently well cared for).

You should, of course, be watching for the eponymous Northern Lights throughout the day and night. These are possible/very likely anywhere in Lapland from September through to April although are best around Christmas and New Year. Some people – including us at the Finland Travel Guide – reckon that thanks to near-zero light pollution that they are the best Northern Lights in Scandanavia (just don’t tell the Norwegians or Swedes!). Rovaniemi has perhaps the best reputation for being ‘guaranteed’ to see the lights, but we found the quality was better at Kakslauttanen thanks to being that little bit more remote.

Finland is famous for its tens of thousands of lakes – and a huge number of little castles and fortifications that tend to be dotted around them. Just by strolling aimlessly about the Oulanka, Nuuksio, Urho or Koli national parks you’d be sure to stumble across them by the dozen – but that is certainly not recommended! When the Finland Travel Guide says wilderness we really do mean it.

While there are plenty of well-walked routes with a good mixture of difficulties and lengths, you just need to venture a little away from the more traveled paths and find yourself in near-total isolation. If you are heading from some ‘proper’ hiking then make sure you have the right gear and some understanding of basic fieldcraft and navigation.

You’d be forgiven for thinking that Finland was all about traipsing through the wilds, and while that ought to be a key part of any visit, there is plenty else to see in towns and cities found mostly towards the southern and eastern ends. Helsinki is an excellent city to visit not just because it has the Suomenlinna park on its doorstep but because there is also plenty to see in the city itself.

It is particularly good for walking/cycling tours (highly recommended) so make certain to see the Temppeliaukio Church, Uspenski Cathedral, Sibelius Monument, and other national sites. When you cannot stomach any more culture, check out the Töölönlahti Bay for some amazing seafood or maybe relax on the Hietaranta beach (yes Helsinki has a beach!).

Most people will arrive and depart from Helsinki and then travel onwards further north without taking the time to visit much of the central regions. As with any European country, it can be as straightforward or as spontaneous and unexpected as you choose.

Much of Finland receives very little in the way of regular tourism – certainly less than neighboring Sweden – and you should expect a level of authenticity that can be quite rare to find elsewhere. Turku Castle towards the Russian border is a fascinating place steeped in many centuries of conflict, while the Åland Archipelago is perfect for exploring by boat (and a handy way of getting over to Stolkholm to continue your travels).

What Are the Best Things to Do in Finland?

Finland is a kinda handy country to tour because you tend to go to specific regions for particular activities. The iconic experiences such as hiking and sledding through the wilderness are basically all there is to do in the northern Lapland region besides the occasional museum and staring in amazement at the Northern Lights. You could pretty much ‘experience’ the region with just a handful of days, or you could take a serious hiking expedition that may last for weeks.

Much of the same can be said for the lake regions and all of the national parks . If you are interested in exploring and really experiencing what it is like to be in the middle of nowhere then Finland is a fantastic place for doing so with paradoxical ease.

One experience that your correspondent from the Ultimate Finland Travel Guide loved far more than anticipated was staying for a couple of nights in one of the more famous Ice Hotels. You’ll find similar examples in the other Scandi countries and in North America, but for the convenience of the uninitiated, they are surprisingly luxurious and deceptively warm!

Best of all is that they tend to be remodeled every year – whoever knew how easy it was to cut huge chunks of ice so elegantly? It is the perfect way of enjoying a chilled Finnish vodka martini in the comfort of your hot tub!

Santa is – needless to say – a big draw especially with one/two-night trippers from other parts of Europe (especially the UK and Germany for some reason). Fortunately, it hasn’t become grossly over the top and there is a good amount of tongue in cheek joking between which version of Santa is the real one – the white-bearded old man, or the mythical and slightly creepy goat.

We’ll let you make up your own mind, and the good news is that commercialism is there to enjoy if you like it – or you could easily turn the other way and enjoy natural splendor. Whoever said variety was a bad thing?

Helsinki is pretty small for a capital city (about 600,000 from a national population of 5.5m) but has a thriving contemporary and classical art scene, plenty of festivals across the calendar including the ‘world-famous’ Air Guitar Championship… In all seriousness, it is very reminiscent of Rekjavik and Gothenburg in the way that it focuses very much on delivering high quality produce/shopping at often quite high prices. Check out the various museums/galleries when you have the opportunity – the Ateneum, Sinebrychoff Art Galley, Finnish National Gallery, and several smaller residences are well worth the time and invariably serve amazing quality coffee.

So while it can be straightforward to pigeonhole Finland as an outdoors country there are plenty of alternative sites well worth taking the time to explore. Despite Helsinki being towards the pricier end of the scale, it has been attracting many more ‘in the know’ visitors in recent years who are put off by the often unseemly crowds you’ll find at many of the nearby Baltic capitals. Helsinki is a cool city and one that thankfully still has not been in the slightest bit defiled by mass tourism.

When is The Best Time to Visit Finland?

Hopefully, you are by now a little tempted to give Finland a try – and here is where deciding what time of year to visit is going to really matter. Depending on what you want to see/explore there are very different opinions on what constitutes high, low and shoulder seasons in Finland. For this reason, we’ll roughly distinguish by experiences instead of the time of year.

Should you be interested in camping and hiking through the central and coastal regions, and most people are, then July/August is the time to visit. You’ll have no problem finding plenty of cruises to compare, accommodation can be surprisingly cheap (or at least open!), and most of the large festivals occur around this time of year. Remember that many Finnis tend to take their annual vacations in the winter to enjoy snow sports, or to simply flee the country for more gentle climates!

But we at the Finland Travel Guide are not put off by a little frost. Aurora hunting is best over the winter months (especially either side of Christmas) and you’ll enjoy proper winter wilderness. Days are short, hotels are often closed, and those which are open cater mostly for skiing at pretty steep prices. Hiking is not likely unless you really know what you are doing or are willing to take a guided expedition. If you are determined to see the Lights and experience Finland as it is best known, then this is the time to visit.

Shoulder season is probably the best time if you intend on spending a lot of time outdoors and wish to enjoy a mild climate and not too many insects in the northern regions. Again, you need to plan a little for some attractions being potentially closed or in refitting, although the major museums/galleries ought to be open. Watch out for Midsummer – the whole country has a party for a weekend and basically everything closes down. Fantastic if you are already in the country, not so much if you are looking for a running train or an open attraction!

Do I Need A Tourist Visa in Finland?

You really should have no problems whatsoever gaining entry into Finland. Those from the majority of Western countries (Including the USA, UK, NZ, Australia, Canada, and EU nationals) can stay for 90 days out of 180 consecutively. Anyone else – including visitors from South Africa, China, and India – will need a visa.

Expect no trouble passing through immigration providing your documents are in order. Visas are usually issued quite promptly where needed but you must apply and be approved before arriving.

Evening scenery of the Old Port in Helsinki, Finland - ultimate finland travel guide

Do U.S. Citizens Need A Visa for Finland

U.S. citizens do not need a visa to enter Finland, which simplifies entry into the country; however, a passport valid for at least six months past the planned date of departure is required.

What Currency Is Used in Finland?

Finland uses the Euro (€) that exchanges for around US$ 1.11 at the time of writing the Finland Travel Guide.

You will have absolutely no problems using cards for payment pretty much anywhere in Finland. Even the smallest stores and cafes will 99% of the time accept credit/debit card payments providing you have a four-digit PIN-enabled account. ATMs are still absolutely everywhere, should offer English language options, and do not charge any processing fees (although your banking services provider most certainly will).

The majority of visitors to Finland will get by just fine with a token amount of cash for small purchases and by using cards for everything else. If for some reason you need a bundle of cash then make sure to use banks for the best exchange rates. Note that the Finns are so invested in card technology that Traveler’s Checks are pretty much consigned to the history books nowadays and very few places will change them.

Do I Tip In Finland?

You will not be offending your server by not leaving a cash tip – it is almost universally added bills automatically (including hotel room charges). Only feel inclined to leave a tip for truly exceptional attention. Tipping is not customary for taxi drivers or bartenders although once again it is entirely at your discretion.

What Kind Of Budget Do I Need In Finland?

While Finland has a reputation for being an often surprisingly expensive country to visit the reality on the ground is somewhat different. It is perfectly achievable to explore Finland on a tighter budget than what you may expect, although you are inevitably going to be restricted by price constraints on what activities you can afford.

For instance, a hiking and camping tour of Finland during the summer is not going to break anyone’s bank. However, a ‘winter wonderland’ stay in the North during the peak Aurora chasing times of the year with incidental reindeer sleigh rides is going to become expensive very quickly. So with those caveats in mind here is a rough approximation on what we at the Finland Travel Guide would suggest visitors should expect from their budgets.

Budget (€100/day)

Hostels are universally good quality in Finland and visitors certainly benefit from the fact that the country is not actually known as a budget destination. You should look to book ahead in the summertime but that is really just to make certain your bed is secured – we have rarely struggled to find a place anywhere. A smart dorm bed with the expected conveniences will cost about €25-40/night depending on location and season. Campsites can easily be half that rate, but of course, you will be restricted to summertime and shoulder seasons.

Daily costs are where prices start to become noticeably expensive. There are always budget-conscious options from shops, takeaways, and food stalls but you’ll be looking at about €20+ for a single course meal at any seated restaurant. National museums are usually free but others will charge pretty steep admission rates comparable to what you’d expect in Paris/Berlin. We’ll cover travel costs shortly but on a budget, you’ll be advised to take a look at buses compared to the much more expensive train network.

As with many countries where the key attraction is unspoiled and natural beauty, providing you keep an eye on your expenditure you can enjoy a really good time in Finland without spending a huge sum.

Mid-Level (€200/day)

We’d compare this kind of budget to what you’d expect to pay in Sweden. Broadly speaking the prices for accommodation and travel are very similar, with double hotel rooms most likely going to be the largest daily expense. You should anticipate about €100-120/night for a basic yet modern hotel room. Factor in that price tends to be lower at certain times of the year and that the wilder/remote regions will usually be considerably more expensive.

Even though rooms are expensive assuming you are splitting that cost for a double there is still a fair amount to ‘play with’ on this budget. You could stretch that a little and take some sleighing trips, perhaps even a little cruise around the islands, and still not massively go overboard (so to speak!). Consider your dining options with some degree of care. Eating out is often reserved for very special events throughout the Scandinavian countries and you’ll notice this reflected in the high prices. Even a cup of coffee and a slice of cake in Helsinki can stretch beyond €10.

On the plus side, while museums and galleries are prone to charge admission they will not be much of a problem on this budget. Car hire is feasible if you are sharing as a group (€50/day) although fuel is very expensive. Generally speaking, you ought to take this kind of budget and look for the best way of applying it to the sort of stay you are looking for. If you want wilderness, then spend more on special retreats and lodges which are expensive but tend to include meals and subsidized tours/expeditions. If you are in the city, compromise on your hotel and spend big on the nightlife, shopping, and outstanding restaurants.

High-End (€300+)

You can spend your entire daily budget on a top of the range hotel room on this kind of budget – and would be right to expect something very boutique, trendy and most certainly upmarket! Throw in about the same again if you want to enjoy a meal at one of Finlands top restaurants – the prices on the wine lists are comically high, so consider that an adequate warning.

Joking aside you can enjoy pretty much all the best of Finland on this budget. You most certainly can enjoy the natural splendor, but rather than retreating to a campsite for the evening why not go ‘glamping’ at kitsch and cozy 5-star alternatives? Definitely take the opportunity for a sleigh ride, and who knows – maybe even a personalized trip to see the Santa of your choice.

Those with money to burn should perhaps consider midsummer providing you can find a hotel room. they book out sometimes years in advance assuming they choose to stay open at all. All of the Nordic countries have their own versions, and the communal festivals are incredibly welcoming to outsiders.

Overall, while it most certainly helps to have some cash when visiting Finland you can still enjoy plenty of the best in the country without spending crazy money. From a budget travelers’ perspective, you will need to think a little outside the box if you wish to enjoy key attractions such as the Northern Lights. Perhaps look for Airbnb options in popular areas that may offer better value compared to hotels. Or simply book one of the every limited hostel places in the northern regions far in advance. However you choose to approach it, the more effort put into experiencing something that amazing the better the experience is going to be.

Cozy wooden cottage in dark winter forest - ultimate finland travel guide

What Languages Are Spoken in Finland?

Finnish is the language you’ll hear the most but Swedish is also an official language in Finland. From a visitor’s perceptive it is unlikely to make much of a difference – pretty much all Finns will speak English to an impressive standard with about 40% of the country at fluency standard. Lower proportions speak German as a second (or third/fourth/fifth) language.

It is worth knowing that despite the above, around 10% of the Finnish population – mostly those residing in isolated regions – do not speak any conversational English.

Do not feel awkward about approaching Finns to ask a question and speaking immediately in English – providing you do so politely. Finnish is notoriously difficult to learn and none of the locals will expect more than a simple “anteeski” (excuse me) first.

What Religions Are Practiced in Finland?

About 72% of Finns are Christian (almost all Lutheran), 24% specify no religious beliefs whatsoever and the remaining makeup tiny pockets of Islam, Buddhism, and others. As you may anticipate the Lutheran church enjoys a special status as the ‘official religion’ of the country even though it has little in the way of actual administrative power. It is quite paradoxical that even though Finland has encouraged freedom of religion protected by law since 1923, they are one of the least diverse religious countries in Europe.

Visitors to the country will not really notice any religious undercurrent unless they wish to participate. Religion is a factor in some people’s lives, but Finns are quite a socially conservative bunch and tend not to discuss such matters with strangers. You will find little in the way of evangelicism or more vocal denominations.

Practical Tips From The Finland Travel Guide

Now we have covered the basics for what anyone ought to expect from visiting the country, we’ll now shift our attention tot he simple practicalities of making the most of your stay. We at the Finland Travel Guide are not kidding when we claim that despite the reputation for being expensive and tricky to navigate, you can really explore this country without spending beyond your means. Just like Sweden and to a lesser extent Norway, the savvy traveler can have a wonderful time in this gorgeous country despite living from hand to mouth. You just need to think a little and make some compromises here and there.

Something you may have heard during your research into Finland is that they aren’t really the most ‘touchy-feely’ of people! There is an element of truth to this. Finns are really not people who tend to perform small talk, and attempting to speak to a stranger on a casual basis – for instance, commenting on the weather – will likely be met with a degree of bafflement. Obviously, that is not true for everyone but it is something which can incorrectly present a rather stubborn attitude towards visitors.

Their rivalry with Sweden has existed for hundreds of years, and their animosity towards Russians still ranks pretty deep among older segments of the population. Finns have struggled for many generations to achieve and maintain their freedom, which does, to a degree, foster a kind of insularity that can be misinterpreted as impoliteness or even hostility. They aren’t really like that. Just be careful to mind/appreciate personal space, avoid eye contact, be exceedingly polite and keep your voices down and you’ll be fine!

You’ll find the best way to engage in conversation with strangers in Finland is either in the sauna or in the bar. Those are socially acceptable places to discuss sporting events and suchlike in a casual manner. People will want to be your friend really!

Finland Bright colors of summer.

What About Health and Safety in Finland, Is It Safe?

Finland has one of the lowest general crime rates in Europe and violent crime is extremely rare. Visitors are unlikely to be specifically targeted and even petty crimes such as bag theft and pickpocketing are practically unheard of. You’ll be extremely unlucky to fall victim to any crime in Finland.

Your biggest risks to personal safety are going to be from approaching the wilderness without proper equipment. It ought to go without saying that apart from the summer you will need some degree of warm clothing, plus adequate tents and so forth. There is dangerous wildlife (bears, wolves, etc) in Finland but they will stay far away from people. You are far more likely to crash a car into a moose – lookout for the roadsigns – than even sea a bear or wolf. Keep an eye out for hypothermia or frostbite in the winter, and mosquito bites in the summer. The latter is more a nuisance than a risk.

Moving on to healthcare, Finland has some of the best medical care in the world and you’ll be in good hands if you are injured or fall sick. EU citizens should apply for and carry an EHIC before visiting Finland to enjoy free/massively subsidized costs. You may still require special insurance if planning on skiing or taking on more extreme winter sports.

Visitors from elsewhere are going to need comprehensive insurance cover. Remember to make copies of prescriptions and any essential medical notices, ideally uploaded also to the Cloud for immediate retrieval if required. You may need to visit a Finnish doctor for reissues of prescriptions and accept that available brands may vary compared to what you are used to.

You should not require any particular vaccinations before you visit. The Finland Travel Guide can gladly attest that Finnish tap water is not only universally safe to drink, but is also the best tasting in the world.

What is the Best Transportation in Finland?

Finland enjoys an excellent train network that should be good enough for most visitors. Tickets can vary in price depending on distance and classification. Express trains are, as you’d expect, faster and more expensive than slower regional services. Ticket prices vary from expensive through to pleasantly affordable providing you book in advance online (at least 24 hours, ideally much longer). The problem is that the further north you head the more limited the network becomes. Just like Sweden, Finland is deceptively long and narrow and journeys can take much longer than you’d anticipate.

Buses are available on a wider network and in some ways are a better option than the train. Tickets are cheaper, and considering the long distances, the buses themselves are clean, comfortable and modern. Note that Finland has a relatively low-speed limit so expect longer journeys to take up a good chunk of a day.

Most Finns would opt for the bus compared to the train because while offers exist for both the bus has a better variety of discounts especially for younger people and seasonal passes. If you are visiting on a budget then the bus is certainly most likely your best bet for saving on costs while also taking in some pretty impressive scenery.

Note that some services do not run in winter so check well in advance. If money is not a problem and/or you are part of a group, car hire is pretty good value, roads are high quality and invariably cleared of snow around the clock. Just remember that gas prices are some of the highest in Europe.

Ferries run routinely throughout the year out to the islands and back over to central/eastern Europe. Domestic services can actually be a great way of exploring the western areas for decent prices, and certainly far cheaper than an organized tourist cruise which would take the same route anyway.

Internal flights are a valid option from getting between Helsinki and Lapland, just be sure to check availability according to the season you intend on traveling. As you’d anticipate, tickets are extremely expensive in peak season and often fully booked out well in advance. Discounts are rare on any internal route.

Beautifully decorated Christmas house

What Are the Best Accommodations in Finland?

Hostels – where available – are the visitor’s best friend when hoping to explore Helsinki on a budget. As a rough rule, accommodation prices are very similar to other Scandinavian countries. Hostels are excellent quality and at about 30 Euro a night are a comparative bargain. Expect to pay four times that for a very average hotel room. High-end accommodation will be at least 200-300 Euros per night and possibly even more for a room that, at the end of the day, is just somewhere to sleep. As ever, the choice is yours.

The Finland Travel Guide suggests that all visitors to this country look at alternative accommodation options besides the typical hostel/hotel conundrum. Finland is an extremely on-line country and you’ll have no problem finding people with spare rooms or even full apartments to let out on a casual basis. For those visiting areas with a more limited choice in ‘traditional’ accommodation then you really ought to consider this as a way not only for saving cash but also as an avenue of getting to known Finland a little better.

In the summertime, the climate is pretty much ideal for hiking and camping. Sites can book out for the more popular spots, so book in advance and pay attention to rough camping laws/restrictions. They can vary depending on your region. Should you opt to camp, expect to find excellent facilities and quite possibly the option for a chalet costing a little more than a standard hostel private room but capable of sleeping four people or so.

How Can I Practice Responsible Tourism in Finland?

Should you be lucky enough to explore Lapland it is essential that any responsible visitor does their best to invest in the indigenous Sámi run services. A good proportion of the best reindeer routes and more interesting Kota (tee-pee) accommodation options are going to be run by these people. Apart from these kinds of businesses they have little other income, so far better to share your money with them compared to some anonymous international hotel chain.

Protecting the natural splendor of Finland is paramount in the tourist industry and a major reason why the country is nowhere near as involved in self-promotion and marketing than it arguably should be. Getting to Lapland is not especially easy – and that is not just due to limited numbers of visitors, but also because of government pressure to keep the environment as unchanged as possible.

Wherever you go in Finland you ought to make sure you leave no trace. That includes campsites and firepits just as much as it does litter and waste. You are free to camp in many areas of the country providing you do so responsibly. Punitive fines are in place should those rules be broken.

Keep a low ecological footprint wherever you go, buy local, and understand the sensibilities of the locals and you can consider yourself a responsible visitor to Finland.

What Food Should I Try In Finland?

Attempting to pronounce classic Finnish foods is only a small part of enjoying how good they can be. There are plenty of national dishes that you’ll find cooked on a regular basis in people’s homes, although for some you may need to visit more specialized restaurants. Here is a selection of the Finland Travel Guide favorites.

Karjalanpiirakka (Karelian pies) is a common ‘working meal’ that is very similar to an English pastry. The usual course pastry is filled with a selection of stewed potato, rice, carrot, and sometimes with added meats and eggs. Handily pocket-sized and packing enough energy to last through the most bitter of winter afternoons, these are a real delicacy that is sure to keep you going.

Ruisleipä is without any doubt the best rye bread that you’ll ever eat. It is taken with pretty much every meal regardless of the restaurant status, and at home is baked in long rings which are hooked to the ceiling for storage. You’ll still see these in pretty much every baker’s shop and once more they are ideal for the penny watching visitor.

Silli Ja Uudet Perunat (herring with new potatoes) is a dill packed national favorite that you’ll find served especially during midsummer festivals. Discussing the merits of various potato is a peculiar Finnish obsession…

Christmas house in official Santa Claus village in Rovaniemi, Finland.

What Should I Pack for A Trip to Finland?

Try not to forget any essentials when packing for Finland as while replacements are never going to be difficult to find, they can be extremely expensive! Pack suitable outdoors wear for any season, ideally featuring plenty of layers that can be added or removed depending on the weather. A lightweight waterproof item is a good idea despite the mild summers, whereas a good warm hat and overcoat are pretty much essential in winter. Make sure your boots are in good order and properly waterproofed.

Other than those basics you should not need anything else when visiting Finland.

What Clothes Should You Wear In Finland?

Despite the reputation for being a bit conservative and prudish – which we’ve tried to account for and dispell throughout the Finland Travel Guide – you’re best off dressing to conform in this country. Nobody will challenge you for being scruffy unless you are also wearing something offensive or inappropriate in particular locations. A responsible visitor will not be intending to cause offense anyway, so best reign in the more extreme dress senses during your visit to Finland.

You’ll notice that Finns are quite affluent yet still dress in a pretty unconventional manner. They’re ones for discreet classiness, and that fact ought to be remembered at more upmarket restaurants and so forth.

Castle Olavinlinna (Olofsborg) in winter, Savonlinna, Finland

What Are Some Interesting & Important Facts About Finland?

We are nearing the end of our Finland Travel Guide and hope you have found this a useful introduction to one of Europe’s most beautifully unique countries. As with any country, you will visit, places and people are always going to have some interesting differences and Finland is not any exception to that rule.

Despite their reputation for being a little more clinical than some of their more extravagant European neighbors, you’ll discover plenty of fun and interesting facts while touring this country. After all – it’s always the quietest ones who tend to have more bizarre points of interest! So here are a few little facts to get you started with exploring this fascinating nation.

▸ According to the United Nations, Finland is the happiest nation on Earth (perhaps they just don’t complain enough).

▸ Alongside the world air guitar tournament, Finland is also the global capital for the world wife-carrying championship.

▸ Finland has an annual day to celebrate their failures – October 13th.

▸ Finland no longer has a single public payphone.

▸ Each Finn consumes on average 12kg of coffee per year.

▸ Finland operates unlimited fines for speeding on the highways (told you they drive slow for a reason).

▸ Perhaps that explains why they have more saunas than cars.

▸ Heavy metal is the unofficial national music of Finland

▸ Finland was the first European country to enact Universal Suffrage (allowing women to vote).

▸ They consume more salty licorice than anywhere else on the planet.

We hope you enjoyed reading the Budget Finland Travel Guide – and good travels! Contact us with any questions you may have about travel to Finland.

Now that you have read the Ultimate Finland Travel Guide, what’s next? Let’s go next door to Norway. Check out The Ultimate Norway Travel Guide

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Finland Tours & Trips 2024

Home to saunas, Santa Claus and the Northern Lights , it's not hard to see why Finland is named the Happiest Country in the World. Whether you want to ride a reindeer through the snow-filled forests of Lapland, celebrate the summer solstice at a Midsummer Festival in Helsinki, or be immersed by the tranquillity of the Finnish Lakeland, the cold weather is contrasted by warm locals who have a glass of glögi with your name on it. Combine your adventure of Finland with a Norway and Sweden vacation package for a true Nordic experience.

137 Finland tour packages with 340 reviews

Tailor-Made Finland Adventure to Lapland Tour

  • Active Adventure
  • Christmas & New Year

Tailor-Made Finland Adventure to Lapland

  • Book With Flexibility This operator allows you to rebook your dates or tours with them for free, waiving change fees.

Midnight Sun – 7 Days in Lapland Tour

  • Northern Lights

Midnight Sun – 7 Days in Lapland

"Our experience with Nordic Unique was great. As a little older group some tours did not appeal to us and they were great about rearranging the itinerary. There could have been a little more communication prior to the trip. I would also suggest some kayaks at the lake. Our guide Matthias (Niales) was awesome!! He was patient, kind, knowledgeable and a great cook."

Lapland - 10 Days Adventure in Winter Wonderland Tour

  • Ski, Snowboard & Snow

Lapland - 10 Days Adventure in Winter Wonderland

"Our holiday with Nordic unique travels in Finnish Lapland was excellent! In addition to the wonderful place, the tour guides and the staff at the agency made it a truly remarkable holiday. Although we were quite prepared for the cold, they also offered the full Arctic gear for mostly all activities. All transfers and arrangements went very smoothly and they were always punctual on all occasions. The meals were very nice (where included) and the guides chose the best places that catered for vegetarians (as we were). Massive thanks to Marcelo who is one of the best and most helpful travel agents I've ever come across (having travelled quite a bit!). I feel very lucky to have found him and his company on tour radar! He helped us put together an amazing itinerary and recommended the best accomodation as well as tours that we thoroughly loved. He was always very prompt in replying, very knowledgeable and provided accurate answers to all our questions when we were in the planning stages. He is a true asset to the company and without him we may not have been able to organise our holiday to perfection! Sarka was the best guide we had on our tour (icebreaker). She is a lovely person, extremely friendly and provided exceptional customer service. Really made our trip very special and went above and beyond to make sure we had a great time throughout! We were happy to have Malcolm as our guide on the snowmobile tour as he was highly experienced and skilled. Being very new to this activity, we needed extra guidance which he kindly provided and also supported us patiently to ensure that we thoroughly enjoyed the unique experience. His passion and enthusiasm for snowmobiling and Finland was very heartwarming :) Clement was a very pleasant and helpful guide, never rushing us and ensuring we had a beautiful time at one my most favourite places (Ranua zoo). I cannot recommend them highly enough! We would love to visit Lapland again and wouldn't think twice about booking with them :)))"

Tailor-Made Private Finland Tour to Fairy Tale Lapland Tour

Tailor-Made Private Finland Tour to Fairy Tale Lapland

Autumn Adventure in Kuusamo Tour

  • Educational

Autumn Adventure in Kuusamo

"The trip was fun, and it was a very cool experience overall."
  • €100 deposit on some dates Some departure dates offer you the chance to book this tour with a lower deposit.

Aurora Borealis & Glass Igloo Tour

Aurora Borealis & Glass Igloo

"Good experience and Alain was a great guide! A pity we didn’t catch the lights this time"

Small Group Helsinki and South Karelia in 5 days (Guaranteed departure) Tour

  • In-depth Cultural

Small Group Helsinki and South Karelia in 5 days (Guaranteed departure)

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Finnish Wilderness Week Tour

Finnish Wilderness Week

"Alternate accommodations were made for us at the Logging Lodge / Oulangan maja due to gi illness at basecamp. Overall, Martii organized a very good trip, food was great, everyday we did something different. Ismo and Elina were wonderful to work with when Martii was not with us. Loved the Husky sledding day. Glad we went despite changes of plan/ location. Thanks."

Canoe Expedition in Lapland Tour

Canoe Expedition in Lapland

Highlights of Helsinki & Lappeenranta - 5 Days Tour

Highlights of Helsinki & Lappeenranta - 5 Days

Helsinki & South Karelia Express - 5 Day Tour

Helsinki & South Karelia Express - 5 Day

Finnish Winter Adventure Family Holiday Tour

Finnish Winter Adventure Family Holiday

Helsinki - Turku - Tampere Tour

Helsinki - Turku - Tampere

Finnish Lapland in Winter Tour

Finnish Lapland in Winter

Canoeing escape into the Wilderness in Finland, 105km Tour

  • Kayak & Canoe

Canoeing escape into the Wilderness in Finland, 105km

Finland trip reviews.

"Our holiday with Nordic unique travels in Finnish Lapland was excellent! In addition to the wonderful place, the tour guides and the staff at the agency made it a truly remarkable holiday. Although we were quite prepared for the cold, they also offered the full Arctic gear for mostly all activities. All transfers and arrangements went very smoothly and they were always punctual on all occasions. The meals were very nice (where included) and the guides chose the best places that catered for vegetarians (as we were). Massive thanks to Marcelo who is one of the best and most helpful travel agents I've ever come across (having travelled quite a bit!). I feel very lucky to have found him and his company on tour radar! He helped us put together an amazing itinerary and recommended the best accomodation as well as tours that we thoroughly loved. He was always very prompt in replying, very knowledgeable and provided accurate answers to all our questions when we were in the planning stages. He is a true asset to the company and without him we may not have been able to organise our holiday to perfection! Sarka was the best guide we had on our tour (icebreaker). She is a lovely person, extremely friendly and provided exceptional customer service. Really made our trip very special and went above and beyond to make sure we had a great time throughout! We were happy to have Malcolm as our guide on the snowmobile tour as he was highly experienced and skilled. Being very new to this activity, we needed extra guidance which he kindly provided and also supported us patiently to ensure that we thoroughly enjoyed the unique experience. His passion and enthusiasm for snowmobiling and Finland was very heartwarming :) Clement was a very pleasant and helpful guide, never rushing us and ensuring we had a beautiful time at one my most favourite places (Ranua zoo). I cannot recommend them highly enough! We would love to visit Lapland again and wouldn't think twice about booking with them :)))"

Finland Destinations

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  • Finland Travel Guide | All You Need to Know

International Versions

  • Deutsch: Finnland Rundreisen 2024
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  • Español: Circuitos y Viajes por Finlandia 2024
  • Nederlands: Finland Rondreizen 2024

Finnish-ing touches: all you need to know before your trip to Finland

Kerry Walker

Apr 24, 2022 • 9 min read

Helsinkians spend some time inside Löyly's sauna. 

In Finland, the sauna is a way of life – and an essential experience for any visitor © Jonathan Stokes / Lonely Planet

Finland is the kind of place a child with a particularly vivid imagination might dream up, complete with flying reindeer, the real Santa and so much snow.

It’s a place of extremes – of darkness and light, of bitter cold and unfathomable wilderness. And it’s bound to be right up there with your Nordic dream destinations, whether you’ve come to dash through frozen forests by husky-drawn sleigh as the Northern Lights flash overhead in Lapland, or hunker down in a back-of-beyond summer cottage on the shores of a placid lake in the undying light of summer.

If you love saunas, silence and nature, you’ll fit right in. Here are the things to know to help you plan and prepare your trip and stay safe and healthy in Finland. 

Planning your trip to Finland

Consider arriving outside of helsinki.

Helsinki is the country’s principal gateway, though if you’re coming to Finalnd for a non-urban adventure you might consider flying into a regional airport like Rovaniemi (gateway to Lapland and Santa HQ) or Tampere (gateway to the lakes) instead. Once you’re in Finland, public transport is pretty good and efficient, with trains and buses joining the dots between major cities and towns. But if you’re heading into the wilds, you should count on renting a car, as distances are vast. Pack drinks and snacks for the journey as there’s little in the way of services between hubs.

The roads that sweep north to Lapland are often empty, but you’ll need to watch out for reindeer (the Porokello app warns of high-risk reindeer-crash areas) and ice in winter. 

Summers are for primeval pleasures; winters are for festive magic 

Finland is too big for just one bite, so plan carefully and resist the temptation to cram everything into one trip. 

Summer, you say? The Finns would agree: after long, dark, snowbound winters, they embrace the lighter days of summer with a truly biological urgency. June to August is a brilliant period for hiking and camping in wilderness areas like the reindeer-bobbled fells of Urho Kekkonen National Park in Northern Lapland , above the Arctic Circle. It’s also a great time to jump into a kayak to paddle the Lakeland (there are 188,000), waving to seals as you drift from one gorgeous little speck of an island to the next in Åland on the Baltic. 

Summer is when Finns tiptoe away from the world and back to nature in middle-of-nowhere cottages, some of which are totally off the grid. Days are spent in gleefully primeval ways: foraging for berries, swimming in ice-cold lakes, relaxing in saunas and spending nights under a canopy of stars. The climax is Juhannus , or midsummer, in late June, when families come together for picnics and dancing around bonfires. 

September is quiet and glorious in Lapland, with forests turning gold and crimson and reindeer beginning to rut. As snow arrives in October, a hush falls over the land and many sights and hotels close. But winter brings festive sparkle and visits to Santa in the Arctic north. As the days get shorter, you’ll enjoy the full-on Narnia effect, with dogsledding, snowmobiling, skiing and overnight stays in ice hotels . Get lucky in Lapland and you’ll see the Northern Lights come out to play (statistically October, November and March are best).

The Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis) over snowed-in cottage in Lapland village. Finland

Keep costs down by eating at markets and camping

Finland isn’t cheap, but there are ways to cut costs and save a few euros. Make lunch your main meal of the day, as many restaurants and cafes serve a good-value all-you-can-eat lunch buffet that includes soups, salads and day specials. Most big towns also have a ​​ kauppahalli (covered market hall), where you can grab picnic fixings (breads, cheeses, deli produce, smoked fish) and graze at one of the stalls or cafes selling snacks.

Camping is an inexpensive way to travel around. Most campsites are excellent, with cabins to rent as well as plenty of space to pitch a tent – but they tend to only open from June to August. If you’re willing to forego the warm shower, you can wild-camp thanks to jokamiehenoikeus (everyman’s right) – a great (if adventurous) option in a country with 41 national parks and almost endless expanses of nature. 

Etiquette in Finland: how to fit in with the locals

Keep things casual .

Even in the heart of Helsinki, you can just tell that the Finns are craving the space and solace of the great outdoors, counting down the minutes and hours until they can give civilization the slip and escape to their mökki (summer cottage). The way they dress reflects their nature-loving spirit: casual, practical, sustainable and well suited to the extremes of the seasons. There’s no need to pack lots of fancy clothes, especially if you’re heading beyond the city (as you most likely are). Pack loose layers, thermals and sturdy walking shoes instead. 

Say hello, Finnish style

Kissing on the cheek? No. As a nation that prizes extreme apartness, Finns are a touch more reserved when it comes to greetings. Making eye contact and shaking hands is pretty standard; friends and family tend to hug. “ Hei ” and “ moi ” are two ways to say “hello.” Repeat the latter twice (“ moi moi ”) and it doubles as goodbye. Oh, and remember to be punctual – the Finns always are.

Remember that silence is golden

The old “silence is golden” proverb never rings truer than in Finland. Deep and introspective, the Finns aren’t fans of idle chitchat. Silence here is rarely seen as awkward; if there’s nothing pertinent to say, that’s just fine. You’ll often see friends together in the sauna, silent, perfectly happy in each other’s quiet company. So if a conversation comes to a natural halt, don’t feel as though you have to fill in the gaps with small talk.

And if you’re planning on having a lively chat with your mates in the sauna, think again. In Finland, the sauna demands deep respect – legend even has it that if you behave immodestly, you’ll have to face the fury of the saunatonttu , or sauna elf, who might burn it down in fury.

A blonde woman with a colorful towel in a sauna, Finland

Give the sauna a whirl – and take it seriously

Stripping naked, roasting in a sauna heated to 175°F (80°C), beating yourself with a circulation-boosting birch whisk (a vasta or vihta ), then diving into an avanto (ice hole): this is a Finn’s idea of fun. Sounds masochistic? This country has 1001 ways to toughen you up and the ritual of the sauna (pronounced “sah-OO-nah” rather than “SAW-nuh”) is just one of them. 

The sauna isn’t a luxury in Finland: it’s a way of life. Marriage, divorce, birth, death, new job: you name the life event and you can bet a sauna is involved. There are around three million saunas in Finland, in a country with a population of just 5.5 million. This is where the Finns socialize, do business, put the world to rights, rest, meditate and cleanse. Learning the art of sauna-going is offers a window into the country’s soul. 

Public saunas are nearly always separated by gender. To sauna like a Finn, shower first, get naked, keep quiet, take a towel to sit on and ladle water onto the stove to produce fragrant löyly (steam), taking care not to splash too freely. You should work up a sweat in around 15 minutes – but remember, it’s not a competition. Take frequent breaks and drink water to rehydrate.

People in reindeer-pulled sleigh caravan safari through a wintry forest in Rovaniemi, Lapland, Finland

Embrace the outlandish 

This isolated land of extremes has bred a nation of fiercely independent and idiosyncratic people. Squeaky cheese ( leipäjuusto ) you dunk in coffee, salty licorice ( salmiakki ), ice swimming, flying reindeer, Moomins: Finns love things that the rest of the world consider...odd. If you single out any of these quirky institutions for praise, you just might make friends for life here. This passion for the weird and wonderful extends to a crazy line-up of events, with world championships for everything from wife-carrying to air-guitar playing and swamp soccer.

Health and safety in Finland 

Green, clean and conscientious, Finland is incredibly safe. Still, it’s worth bearing a few things in mind to make sure you stay healthy and happy.

Bring the bug spray

Though not exactly a health risk, the swarms of blood-thirsty insects that descend on the country’s north in summer can be a real bugbear. The mosquitoes, sandflies, midges and horse flies are at their most ferocious in July, but all summer long you’ll need to go armed with strong repellent, especially around lakes and in swampy, densely forested areas. In the wilderness, there are plenty of remote huts where you can crash with a mat and sleeping bag, but bringing along your own tent generally offers more protection from the mosquito storms.

Besides repellent, you might want to bring along a mosquito cap or hat and a travel net to cover your bed or your tent flap to keep the pesky biters at bay.

If you encounter any health issues, you’ll be in good hands

Perhaps it’s the air, the crystal-clear water at the turn of a tap, the vast open spaces, the long forest hikes, or the immune system-boosting saunas and ice swims: Finland radiates good health like few other places on earth. And the country has some of the best health care in the world – so if you do get sick you’ll be in the very best hands. As with all the Nordic countries, the level of care is extraordinarily high and doctors and medical staff generally speak excellent English. 

There are specific travel vaccinations to worry about, though you’ll want to make sure you have decent travel insurance all the same, especially if you’re planning on a winter-sports extravaganza in Lapland or straying from the well-trodden-path in the wilds of a national park. 

If you’re a citizen of the EU, European Economic Area (EEA) or UK, you’re entitled to emergency medical treatment with a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) or UK Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC), though you will still have to pay a daily or per-appointment fee as a Finn would. Otherwise, look into whether your country has a reciprocal arrangement for free medical care in Finland. 

Sunset, morning light with big brown bear walking around lake in the morning light. Dangerous animal in nature forest and meadow habitat: wildlife scene from Finland, near Russian border

Keep an eye out in the wild

Beyond the cities, Finland is a wild, wild place. As with all extreme climates, there are the obvious risks of exposure, hypothermia and frostbite in the Arctic north, and rivers can be prone to flooding when the snow melts. It goes without saying that you should venture out well prepared with the right thermal gear if you are visiting Lapland in winter, when temperatures can plummet to a bitterly cold -22°F (-30°C). Always take a good map and compass, and inform someone of your whereabouts if you’re heading out into one of the vast national parks in the north. 

Predators like brown bears and wolves roam the forested wilds on the Russian border in the country’s east, though they generally mind their own business and pose no real threat.

You might also like: Capital gains: Helsinki on a budget Autumn in Finland: an alternative fall foliage tour Reindeer, bears and elusive seals: Finland’s finest wildlife experiences

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Finland Tours and Trips 2024/2025

The Scandinavian country of Finland is a beautiful destination year-round. In the south, the capital city of Helsinki has a beautiful harbour offering sailing tours and cruises, while Lapland in the north is ideal for sightings of the Northern Lights. Families flock to Rovaniemi each year in hopes of seeing Santa Claus, while snowshoers and skiers head to Kuusamo to get in touch with nature.

  • Finland Travel Guide
  • Best Time To Visit Finland

49 Trips in Finland with 102 Reviews

Finnish Wilderness Week Tour

  • Starts Basecamp Oulanka, Finland
  • Ends Basecamp Oulanka, Finland

Finnish Wilderness Week

  • Best price guaranteed
  • No booking fees
  • Tour Type Group Tour
  • Activities Winter adventure & Trekking and Hiking
  • Accommodation Resort & Lodge
  • Transport Bus & Snowmobile
  • Age Range 16-95 yrs
  • Operated in English
  • Brochure Price: US$ 3,448
  • Special Deal (13%): - US$ 448
  • Total Price from: US$ 3,000
  • Mar 31 Only 8 seats left
  • Apr 07 Only 8 seats left
  • View More Jan 1, 2019 Jan 2, 2019 Jan 3, 2019

Finnish Lapland In Winter Tour

  • Starts Helsinki, Finland
  • Ends Rovaniemi, Finland

Finnish Lapland in Winter

  • Tour Type Small Group Tour
  • Activities Local culture & Natural landmarks sightseeing Local culture , Natural landmarks sightseeing , Cultural, religious and historic sites , Northern lights tours & Honeymoon 'data-more-tripid='10301'>+3 more
  • Accommodation Guest House, Resort, Hotel & Sleeper Train
  • Transport Train, Bus, Private Vehicle, Ferry & Sleeper Train
  • Age Range 15-99 yrs
  • Dec 07 Only 1 seat left
  • Dec 14 Only 5 seats left

Finnish Winter Adventure Family Holiday Tour

Finnish Winter Adventure Family Holiday

  • Activities Family & Winter adventure
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  • Age Range 9-95 yrs
  • Brochure Price: US$ 3,298
  • Special Deal (9%): - US$ 298
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Snowshoeing In Finland Tour

Snowshoeing in Finland

  • Activities Northern lights tours & Winter adventure
  • Brochure Price: US$ 3,148
  • Special Deal (10%): - US$ 313
  • Total Price from: US$ 2,835
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Aurora & Glass Igloo Explorer - 5 Days Tour

  • Starts Rovaniemi, Finland

Aurora & Glass Igloo Explorer - 5 Days

  • Activities Natural landmarks sightseeing
  • Accommodation Hotel
  • Transport Private Vehicle, Bus & Snowmobile
  • Age Range 18-80 yrs
  • Brochure Price: US$ 2,425
  • Special Deal (25%): - US$ 606
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The Northern Lights Of Finland Tour

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The Northern Lights of Finland

  • Activities Northern lights tours & City sightseeing
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  • Age Range 1-95 yrs
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Christmas In Finland - 6 Days Tour

  • Starts Kuhmo, Finland
  • Ends Kuhmo, Finland

Christmas in Finland - 6 Days

  • Activities Festivals and events & Snowmobiling Festivals and events , Snowmobiling , Food tours & Dog sledding 'data-more-tripid='16140'>+2 more
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Lapland Family Explorer - 5 Days Tour

Lapland Family Explorer - 5 Days

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  • Feb 02 10+ seats left

The Turku Archipelago Tour

  • Starts Turku, Finland
  • Ends Turku, Finland

The Turku Archipelago

  • Tour Type Private Tour
  • Activities Bicycle tours & Explorer
  • Accommodation Hotel & Guest House
  • Transport Ferry
  • Age Range 18-99 yrs
  • Jun 02 10+ seats left
  • Jun 09 10+ seats left

Scandinavia Explorer Tour

  • Starts Oslo, Norway

Scandinavia Explorer

  • Activities Countryside and village visits & Cultural, religious and historic sites Countryside and village visits , Cultural, religious and historic sites , Museum and gallery visits & Natural landmarks sightseeing 'data-more-tripid='3059'>+2 more
  • Accommodation Hotel & Hut
  • Transport Train, Bus, Private Vehicle, Boat & Ferry
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Finland Wilderness Discovery - 5 Days Tour

Finland Wilderness Discovery - 5 Days

  • Activities Wildlife & Honeymoon
  • Accommodation Hut & Resort
  • Transport Bus
  • Brochure Price: US$ 2,085
  • Special Deal (25%): - US$ 521
  • Total Price from: US$ 1,564
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Baltic Experience Tour

  • Ends Vilnius, Lithuania

Baltic Experience

  • Activities Countryside and village visits & Cultural, religious and historic sites Countryside and village visits , Cultural, religious and historic sites , National parks , Museum and gallery visits & Adventure 'data-more-tripid='3058'>+3 more
  • Accommodation Hotel & Home-stay
  • Transport Ferry, Train, Bus & Private Vehicle
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  • May 11 Only 10 seats left

Lapland & The Arctic Circle - 5 Days Tour

Lapland & the Arctic Circle - 5 Days

  • Activities Polar expeditions and cruise
  • Accommodation Hotel, Hut & Ship Cabin
  • Transport Snowmobile, Cruise Ship, Bus & Private Vehicle
  • Brochure Price: US$ 1,555
  • Special Deal (25%): - US$ 389
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New Year's In Finland - 7 Days Tour

New Year's in Finland - 7 Days

  • Activities Festivals and events & Snowmobiling Festivals and events , Snowmobiling , Skiing and Snowboarding & Dog sledding 'data-more-tripid='16050'>+2 more
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Traveling to Finland? Chat with a local travel specialist in Finland who can help organize your trip.

Alla Kaleis

Finland Tour Reviews

Finland - tour highlights and travel tips.

Winter is a good time to plan a holiday to Finland

Spending holidays in Finland is like visiting a winter wonderland. However, this northern European nation rarely gets the attention it deserves. Finland is one of the most outstanding and breath-taking countries in the world. In winter, its snow-covered forests, frozen valleys, and endless horizons will transport you to a fairy-tale world. During the summer, tree lines as far as the eye can see, clear blue skies, and untouched lakes will make you want to stay forever. A trip to Finland needs to be in your travel bucket list if it isn’t already. Don’t miss out on some of the most breath-taking landscapes on earth. 

Travel Highlights

  • Visit Suomenlinna, which is an 18th century sea fortress and a UNESCO world heritage site.
  • Visit Helsinki Senate Square, a must-see in every visit to Helsinki.
  • Rovaniemi is the “official” home of Santa Claus, and a mere one hour flight from Helsinki .
  • Högberget’s Cave is another outstanding sight that was formed during an ice age.
  • The Legendary Gold Fields of Lapland is full of myths and adventure.

Travel Tips

  • Finland is the land of saunas. It would be a crime to not seek one out while visiting. The country claims to have roughly 3.5 million saunas in all of Finland, which is equivalent to a sauna for every 1.6 people.
  • Thanks to the strong influences from Sweden and Russia, Finnish architecture is one of the most breath-taking ones in Europe. Go for a walk around Helsinki and admire the architecture, especially works by Alvar Aalto.
  • If you’re looking to connect with nature, there’s no better place than Finland. Pack appropriately and head out to the Finnish archipelago for an amazing experience.
  • If you’re not planning on driving, then it’s a good idea to obtain a Rail Pass while in Finland. These passes could save you quite a bit on transportation, and help you get around the country easily.
  • For those who want to visit Finland on a budget, opt for the Fall and Winter months. Prices at these times are, as you might expect, much cheaper than the high season. Frozen Finnish landscapes are truly mesmerizing, which makes it absolutely worth it.
  • If you’re hunting for northern lights, then the winter months are the best times to visit. Sign up for a northern light safari, and go out hunting for northern lights on a snowmobile!

Finland has seasonal weather so please do check up on best time to visit Finland before planning your tour. And if you’re still hunting for more things to do and places to explore in Finland, do check out our Finland Travel Guide for more information.

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8 Best Places to See the Northern Lights in 2024

Posted: December 26, 2023 | Last updated: December 26, 2023

<p>Usually, the Northern Lights can only be seen in countries that are part of the Arctic Circle, such as Norway, Finland, and Iceland. However, sometimes, stargazers in places as far afield as the U.S. get lucky enough to <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/highly-visible-northern-lights-news/">spot the aurora borealis</a>. And in 2024, the spectacle will be the strongest it's been in the last 20 years—and visible from locations all over the world.</p><p>"According to solar activity patterns, now is also the best time to see the Northern Lights," says <strong>Matthew Valentine</strong>, head of U.S. sales at <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.havilavoyages.com/">Havila Voyages</a>. "Aurora borealis events are caused when geomagnetic storms on the sun pull on Earth's magnetic field, and this creates cosmic waves that launch electrons into the atmosphere to form the aurora. Naturally, there are high and low cycles of these solar disturbances, and 2023-2025 will be a period of peak solar activity."</p><p>Whether you go on a cruise, take a scenic train ride, or fly to a new state or country, you have plenty of options to witness this marvel while it's brightest through April. Keep reading to discover the best places to see the Northern Lights in 2024.</p><p><p><strong>RELATED: <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/off-the-radar-winter-travel-destinations/">The 14 Best Off-the-Radar Winter Destinations in the U.S.</a></strong></p></p>

Usually, the Northern Lights can only be seen in countries that are part of the Arctic Circle, such as Norway, Finland, and Iceland. However, sometimes, stargazers in places as far afield as the U.S. get lucky enough to spot the aurora borealis . And in 2024, the spectacle will be the strongest it's been in the last 20 years—and visible from locations all over the world.

"According to solar activity patterns, now is also the best time to see the Northern Lights," says Matthew Valentine , head of U.S. sales at Havila Voyages . "Aurora borealis events are caused when geomagnetic storms on the sun pull on Earth's magnetic field, and this creates cosmic waves that launch electrons into the atmosphere to form the aurora. Naturally, there are high and low cycles of these solar disturbances, and 2023-2025 will be a period of peak solar activity."

Whether you go on a cruise, take a scenic train ride, or fly to a new state or country, you have plenty of options to witness this marvel while it's brightest through April. Keep reading to discover the best places to see the Northern Lights in 2024.

RELATED: The 14 Best Off-the-Radar Winter Destinations in the U.S.

<p>No matter where you are in Norway, it's almost a guarantee that you'll be able to see the Northern Lights.</p><p>"Rich with outdoor adventure-filled experiences, like dogsledding, cross-country skiing, kayaking, and mountain biking, Norway is one of the best places in the world to catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights," says Valentine.</p><p>However, experts suggest that one of the best ways to witness the phenomenon is on a cruise ship. The <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.havilavoyages.com/offers/northern-lights-promise">Havila Voyages Northern Lights Promise</a> cruise travels around Norway for 12 days, while the <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.aurora-expeditions.com/destination/northern-lights/">Aurora Expeditions Northern Lights Explorer</a> discovery voyage starts in Norway and also explores Greenland and Iceland over three weeks.</p><p>"While venturing along the Norwegian Coast in Norway, travelers will Zodiac cruise through spectacular Trollfjord, a gorge flanked by steep mountains, and so narrow that it can only be accessed by small ships," a spokesperson for Aurora Expeditions said. Travelers will also pass through Jan Mayen, home to the huge Beerenberg volcano, which is known as the world's northernmost active volcano.</p>

No matter where you are in Norway, it's almost a guarantee that you'll be able to see the Northern Lights.

"Rich with outdoor adventure-filled experiences, like dogsledding, cross-country skiing, kayaking, and mountain biking, Norway is one of the best places in the world to catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights," says Valentine.

However, experts suggest that one of the best ways to witness the phenomenon is on a cruise ship. The Havila Voyages Northern Lights Promise cruise travels around Norway for 12 days, while the Aurora Expeditions Northern Lights Explorer discovery voyage starts in Norway and also explores Greenland and Iceland over three weeks.

"While venturing along the Norwegian Coast in Norway, travelers will Zodiac cruise through spectacular Trollfjord, a gorge flanked by steep mountains, and so narrow that it can only be accessed by small ships," a spokesperson for Aurora Expeditions said. Travelers will also pass through Jan Mayen, home to the huge Beerenberg volcano, which is known as the world's northernmost active volcano.

<p>Greenland is part of the Arctic Circle, so it makes sense that it's one of the best places to see the Northern Lights. <strong>Kristen Czudak</strong>, the author behind <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://yonderlustramblings.com/">Yonderlust Ramblings,</a> specifically recommends <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://visitgreenland.com/destinations/kangerlussuaq/">Kangerlussuaq</a>, a small town on the country's southwest coast, for peak displays.</p><p>"Greenland as a whole, and Kangerlussuaq in particular, have extremely low light pollution due to the small population, which is ideal for spotting the Northern Lights," says Czudak. To see them, you can simply look out your window or book a guided tour.</p><p>"There are far fewer crowds on Northern Lights tours in Greenland than there are in more well-known and easier-to-reach destinations, so you can have more of the experience to yourself," she adds.</p><p>If you opt for a cruise that includes Greenland, Aurora Expeditions says, "Along the glacier-covered eastern coast of Greenland, visit the Inuit village of Ittoqqortoormiit, the most isolated and northernmost permanent settlement in the region, and explore Scoresbysund, the world's largest fjord system and favorite hunting ground of the local Inuit."<p><strong>RELATED: <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/blue-water-vacation-us/">10 Most Beautiful Blue Water Destinations in the U.S</a>.</strong></p></p>

2 Greenland

Greenland is part of the Arctic Circle, so it makes sense that it's one of the best places to see the Northern Lights. Kristen Czudak , the author behind Yonderlust Ramblings, specifically recommends Kangerlussuaq , a small town on the country's southwest coast, for peak displays.

"Greenland as a whole, and Kangerlussuaq in particular, have extremely low light pollution due to the small population, which is ideal for spotting the Northern Lights," says Czudak. To see them, you can simply look out your window or book a guided tour.

"There are far fewer crowds on Northern Lights tours in Greenland than there are in more well-known and easier-to-reach destinations, so you can have more of the experience to yourself," she adds.

RELATED: 10 Most Beautiful Blue Water Destinations in the U.S .

<p>"There are many excellent viewpoints for the Northern Lights in the 'Land of Fire and Ice' between September and April," says <strong>Birgir Jónsson</strong>, CEO of <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.flyplay.com/en">PLAY Airlines</a>. "Travelers can plan Northern Lights Tours from Reykjavik or relax and enjoy the show from a geothermal luxury spa at night."<strong>Laurie Hobbs</strong>, manager at <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.exodustravels.com/us/">Exodus Adventure Travels</a>, shares that travelers can revel in the northern lights through exciting winter activities such as snowshoeing, dog sledding, and cross-country skiing.</p><p>Aurora Expeditions adds that, on their cruises, guests can "explore the Westfjords region, which features outstanding landscapes with sheer, table-top mountains that plunge into the sea and pristine North Atlantic vegetation." The cruises also stop at Hornstrandir peninsula, "one of Iceland's most remote and pristine regions," they say.</p>

"There are many excellent viewpoints for the Northern Lights in the 'Land of Fire and Ice' between September and April," says Birgir Jónsson , CEO of PLAY Airlines . "Travelers can plan Northern Lights Tours from Reykjavik or relax and enjoy the show from a geothermal luxury spa at night." Laurie Hobbs , manager at Exodus Adventure Travels , shares that travelers can revel in the northern lights through exciting winter activities such as snowshoeing, dog sledding, and cross-country skiing.

Aurora Expeditions adds that, on their cruises, guests can "explore the Westfjords region, which features outstanding landscapes with sheer, table-top mountains that plunge into the sea and pristine North Atlantic vegetation." The cruises also stop at Hornstrandir peninsula, "one of Iceland's most remote and pristine regions," they say.

<p><strong>Alonso Marly</strong>, travel expert at <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.skyluxtravel.com/">Skylux Travel</a>, notes that it's never a guarantee that you'll see the Northern Lights, so your best bet is to head as far north as possible. And in Finland, that means traveling to the Finnish Lapland in the very north of the Arctic Circle.</p><p>While here, Marly recommends admiring the lights from <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.kakslauttanen.fi/">Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort</a>, as they have glass igloos and cozy, romantic vibes.</p><p>"The resort also organizes Northern Lights hunting expeditions for those who prefer some more action and want to catch the lights while skiing or riding a reindeer sleigh," says Marly.</p><p>If you prefer relaxing, Finland has plenty of other Northern Lights-viewing options, from seaside villas to cozy cabins with large glass windows.</p><p>"As the Northern Lights appear over Finland about 200 nights per year, I can guarantee that it is a must-visit destination for a magical winter vacation and a one-of-a-kind travel experience in 2024," adds Marly.<p><strong>RELATED: <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/most-relaxing-tourist-attractions-in-the-world/">10 Most Relaxing Tourist Attractions in the World, New Study Reveals</a>.</strong></p></p>

Alonso Marly , travel expert at Skylux Travel , notes that it's never a guarantee that you'll see the Northern Lights, so your best bet is to head as far north as possible. And in Finland, that means traveling to the Finnish Lapland in the very north of the Arctic Circle.

While here, Marly recommends admiring the lights from Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort , as they have glass igloos and cozy, romantic vibes.

"The resort also organizes Northern Lights hunting expeditions for those who prefer some more action and want to catch the lights while skiing or riding a reindeer sleigh," says Marly.

If you prefer relaxing, Finland has plenty of other Northern Lights-viewing options, from seaside villas to cozy cabins with large glass windows.

RELATED: 10 Most Relaxing Tourist Attractions in the World, New Study Reveals .

<p>Certain spots in northern Scotland are prime locations to see the Northern Lights, including Inverness. The historic city is the capital of the Scottish Highlands and offers "iconic castles, majestic mountains and unique wildlife, including the famous Loch Ness monster," according to <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.visitscotland.com/places-to-go/inverness">Visit Scotland</a>.<strong>Taylor Beal</strong>, owner and author of the travel blog <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://traversewithtaylor.com/loch-ness-tours-from-edinburgh/">Traverse With Taylor</a>, says the lights have been shining every night this winter in these parts of Scotland. Other northern destinations she recommends are the Outer Hebrides or the Shetland Islands.</p>

Certain spots in northern Scotland are prime locations to see the Northern Lights, including Inverness. The historic city is the capital of the Scottish Highlands and offers "iconic castles, majestic mountains and unique wildlife, including the famous Loch Ness monster," according to Visit Scotland . Taylor Beal , owner and author of the travel blog Traverse With Taylor , says the lights have been shining every night this winter in these parts of Scotland. Other northern destinations she recommends are the Outer Hebrides or the Shetland Islands.

<p>Seeing the Northern Lights doesn't always require a passport. Through April, they'll be visible from the northernmost parts of Michigan. Typically, areas in the upper peninsula offer better views, but the lower peninsula has been seeing the lights more often—thanks to the <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.syfy.com/syfy-wire/upcoming-solar-maximum-will-paint-the-sky-with-northern-lights">solar max</a> Earth is currently experiencing.</p><p>"In Traverse City, visitors can spend the day tasting in the region's robust wine scene, exploring the cozy downtown, and exploring the beautiful natural landscapes and trails at places like <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.nps.gov/slbe/index.htm">Sleeping Bear Dunes</a>, and by night catch a glimpse of the colorful lights," says <strong>Trevor Tkach</strong>, president at <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.traversecity.com/">Traverse City Tourism</a>. He also recommends going to <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.missionpointlighthouse.com/">Mission Point Lighthouse</a> for a chance at spotting the display.</p><p>These places provide the optimal dark sky conditions that are needed for the lights to appear bright and vibrant.<p><strong>RELATED: <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/best-destinations-for-stargazing-us-news/">The 10 Best Destinations for Stargazing in the U.S.</a></strong></p></p>

Seeing the Northern Lights doesn't always require a passport. Through April, they'll be visible from the northernmost parts of Michigan. Typically, areas in the upper peninsula offer better views, but the lower peninsula has been seeing the lights more often—thanks to the solar max Earth is currently experiencing.

"In Traverse City, visitors can spend the day tasting in the region's robust wine scene, exploring the cozy downtown, and exploring the beautiful natural landscapes and trails at places like Sleeping Bear Dunes , and by night catch a glimpse of the colorful lights," says Trevor Tkach , president at Traverse City Tourism . He also recommends going to Mission Point Lighthouse for a chance at spotting the display.

RELATED: The 10 Best Destinations for Stargazing in the U.S.

<p>Alaska is known for its long winters and dark days, which make it a great spot to catch the aurora borealis. <strong>Brittany Betts</strong>, a travel expert at <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://smokymountains.com/">SmokyMountains.com</a>, suggests an overnight Alaskan train tour.</p><p>"The <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.alaskarailroad.com/ride-a-train/our-trains/aurora-winter">Alaska Railroad</a>, specifically, has overnight railroad experiences that let you see the lights from a different perspective," says Betts. "You take off and hop out in different locations, spend the day doing wintery activities, and then catch the amazing views at night."</p>

Alaska is known for its long winters and dark days, which make it a great spot to catch the aurora borealis. Brittany Betts , a travel expert at SmokyMountains.com , suggests an overnight Alaskan train tour.

"The Alaska Railroad , specifically, has overnight railroad experiences that let you see the lights from a different perspective," says Betts. "You take off and hop out in different locations, spend the day doing wintery activities, and then catch the amazing views at night."

<p>If you're planning on staying in North America to witness the Northern Lights, then heading up to Jasper in Alberta, Canada should be on your itinerary.</p><p>"Home to the second largest Dark Sky preserve in the world and due to its geographic location, <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://parks.canada.ca/pn-np/ab/jasper">Jasper National Park</a> is an incredible place for world-class stargazing year-round, but also for seeing the aurora borealis," says <strong>Tyler Riopel</strong>, director of destination development at <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.jasper.travel/about-tourism-jasper/staff/">Tourism Jasper</a>.</p><p>The lights are most likely to display between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. which is known as "magnetic midnight" by locals.</p><p>"The <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://jasperplanetarium.com/">Jasper Planetarium</a> offers numerous tour options where guests can utilize powerful outdoor telescopes to see the wonders of the dark sky," says Riopel. "For an elevated option, guests can even book the Stargazer's Lakeside Dinner, which includes dinner at Aalto restaurant with lakefront views, followed by time with some of the Canadian Rockies' biggest telescopes."<p><strong>For more travel advice delivered straight to your inbox, <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/newsletters/">sign up for our daily newsletter</a>.</strong></p></p><p>Read the original article on <em><a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/best-places-to-see-northern-lights-2024/">Best Life</a></em>.</p>

8 Jasper, Alberta, Canada

If you're planning on staying in North America to witness the Northern Lights, then heading up to Jasper in Alberta, Canada should be on your itinerary.

"Home to the second largest Dark Sky preserve in the world and due to its geographic location, Jasper National Park is an incredible place for world-class stargazing year-round, but also for seeing the aurora borealis," says Tyler Riopel , director of destination development at Tourism Jasper .

The lights are most likely to display between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. which is known as "magnetic midnight" by locals.

For more travel advice delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for our daily newsletter .

Read the original article on Best Life .

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Finland Tours & Holidays

Red wooden cottage amongst the trees reflected in the lake in rural Finland

With winter skies painted in dancing lights, a capital city steeped in Nordic culture and plenty of chic Scandinavian style, there's much more to this northern gem than snow and saunas.

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Finnish Lapland in Winter

Sweden or Finland? Which country should you travel to first?

Why to consider solo travel in Scandinavia (and what to expect)

7 new destinations to explore with Intrepid in 2018

5 reasons Finnish Lapland should be on your bucket list

How to budget travel in Scandinavia

Finland at a glance

Capital city.

Helsinki (pop: 631,000)

5.5 million

Finnish, Swedish

(GMT+02:00) Helsinki, Kyiv, Riga, Sofia, Tallinn, Vilnius

CALLING CODE

Electricity.

Type C (European 2-pin) Type F (German 2-pin, side clip earth)

Learn more about Finland

Best time to visit finland.

Finland has pleasant summers, with July being the warmest month (temperatures usually average around 15°C).

Outdoor activities like hiking, mountain biking and fishing are popular during summer and spring.

In Lapland midsummer is also the time of the midnight sun, a phenomenon where the sun barely sets.

Winter runs from November to March and during this time expect plenty of snowfall - perfect for skiing, snow boarding, snowshoeing and sledding. With temperatures regularly hitting -20°C, Finland's winters are particularly cold, so pack accordingly if travelling at this time.

Geography and environment

Finland is home to large tracts of forest, a multitude of pure lakes and hundreds of islands, making it one of nature's most blessed landscapes.

The north of Finland (known as Lapland) is characterised by relatively flat terrain, demarcated by long rivers and due to its Arctic location, extreme snowfall and ice can be found, particularly in winter.

Bordering   Sweden ,   Norway   and   Russia , Finland also has long stretches of coastline along the Baltic Sea, the Gulf of Finland and the Gulf of Bothnia.

The coastal areas are home to thousands of rocky islands (which are mostly uninhabited) while the interior of the country is dominated by forests and lakes.

Top 5 culinary delights of Finland

1. karelian pasty.

This traditional, savoury pie can be found widely throughout Finland. Featuring a rye crust filled with rice and served with egg and butter, this is a simple yet tasty snack ideal for vegetarians.

Finland is home to some of the world's best fresh produce, and the variety of berries on offer is astounding. Blessed with ideal climatic conditions for berry-growing, visitors can expect to snap up superior tasting, fresh cloudberries, blueberries, strawberries, raspberries and lingonberries, See them offered fresh at markets and shops, served alongside meals in sauces, jams and spreads or baked in delicious pies.

3. Kaalikaaryleet

These baked cabbage rolls are a standard entry on most Finnish restaurant menus. Featuring ground beef, rice, onion and cream wrapped in cabbage rolls and served with cranberry or lingonberry sauce, they may be hard to pronounce but they sure are easy to eat.

4. Graavilohi

Finland has a proud heritage steeped in fishing, so it's no surprise that the quality of seafood is very high. This simple meal of salted salmon doesn't need any dressings or condiments as the pure, natural flavours of the salmon are the main attraction.

These sweet bread treats have numerous varieties, from cinnamon, to almonds and raisins. Typically eaten with a coffee, pulla are an inexpensive cafe snack - a great, budget choice in a notoriously expensive country.

Further reading

Similar destinations.

Sweden or Finland?

Finland travel FAQs

Do i need a covid-19 vaccine to join an intrepid trip.

Trips from 1 January 2023 onwards

From 1 January 2023, Intrepid will no longer require travellers to provide proof of vaccination against COVID-19 (excluding all Polar trips and select adventure cruises).

However, we continue to strongly recommend that all Intrepid travellers and leaders get vaccinated to protect themselves and others.

Specific proof of testing or vaccination may still be required by your destination or airline. Please ensure you check travel and entry requirements carefully.

Is tipping customary in Finland?

Tipping isn't customary or expected in Finland and is generally left up to the discretion of the customer. If the service in a café or restaurant is exceptional, feel free to leave spare change or a small tip.

What is the internet access like in Finland?

Travellers should be able to access the internet at cyber cafés and Wi-Fi hot spots in Finland's major cities and towns. Remote and rural areas will have less internet availability, so be prepared for this when travelling out of the city.

Can I use my mobile phone while in Finland?

As the home of Nokia, mobile phone coverage is generally very good in Finland. Travellers should activate global roaming before leaving home.

What are the toilets like in Finland?

Western-style, flushable toilets are the standard in Finland.

What will it cost for a…?

Cup of coffee = 3-4 Euro Bottle of beer = 4-6 Euro Bottle of mid-range wine = 10-12 Euro Basic café lunch = 10-15 Euro Dinner at a mid-range restaurant = 20-30 Euro

Can I drink the water in Finland?

Tap water is considered safe to drink unless otherwise marked.

Are credit cards accepted widely in Finland?

Major credit cards are accepted by most large shops and hotels in Finland. Smaller vendors may not accept credit cards, so carry enough cash to cover small purchases.

What is ATM access like in Finland?

ATMs are commonly found in Finland's cities and urban areas. Remote regions will have less ATM availability, so prepare accordingly before travelling away from cities.

What public holidays are celebrated in Finland?

  • 1 Jan New Year's Day
  • 6 Jan Epiphany
  • 14 Apr Good Friday
  • 16 Apr Easter Sunday
  • 17 Apr Easter Monday
  • 1 May May Day
  • 25 May Ascension Day
  • 4 Jun Whit Sunday
  • 24 Jun Midsummer Day
  • 4 Nov All Saints' Day
  • 6 Dec Independence Day
  • 25 Dec Christmas Day
  • 26 Dec 2nd Day of Christmas

Please note these dates are for 2017. For a current list of public holidays in Finland go to:   http://www.worldtravelguide.net/finland/public-holidays

Do I need to purchase travel insurance before travelling?

Absolutely. All passengers travelling with Intrepid are required to purchase travel insurance before the start of their trip. Your travel insurance details will be recorded by your leader on the first day of the trip. Due to the varying nature, availability and cost of health care around the world, travel insurance is very much an essential and necessary part of every journey.

For more information on insurance, please go to: Travel Insurance

How do I stay safe and healthy while travelling?

Intrepid takes the health and safety of its travellers seriously and takes every measure to ensure that trips are safe, fun and enjoyable for everyone. We recommend that all travellers check with their government or national travel advisory organisation for the latest information before departure:

From Australia?

Go to: Smart Traveller

From Canada?

Go to:  Canada Travel Information

From the UK?

Go to:  UK Foreign Travel Advice

From New Zealand?

Go to:  Safe Travel

From the US?

Go to:  US Department of State

The World Health Organisation also provides useful health information.

Does my trip support The Intrepid Foundation?

Yes, all Intrepid trips support the Intrepid Foundation. Trips to this country directly support our global Intrepid Foundation partners Eden Reforestation Projects and World Bicycle Relief. Intrepid will double the impact by dollar-matching all post-trip donations made to The Intrepid Foundation.

Eden Reforestation Projects

Eden Reforestation Projects are helping to mitigate climate change by restoring forests worldwide; they also hire locally and create job opportunities within vulnerable communities. Donations from our trips support restoration across planting sites in 10 countries around the globe. Find out more or make a donation World Bicycle Relief

World Bicycle Relief provides people in low-income communities with bicycles to mobilise school kids, health workers, and farmers in far-out areas – giving them access to vital education, healthcare, and income. Donations help provide Buffalo Bicycles – specifically designed to withstand the rugged terrain and harsh environment of rural regions – to those who need them most. Find out more or make a donation

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  • Travel Planning Guide

The Best Luxury Tours to Finland

Kemi, Finland

Prepare to be whisked away to a realm of relaxation, luxury, and adventure with one of these sensational luxury tours to Finland. We've scrutinized a wide selection of tours from top-rated companies, guaranteeing that we present you with the epitome of sophistication for a luxury journey in Finland. From lavish accommodations and impeccable service to curated destinations and exclusive activities, every element has been carefully considered. It's time to elevate your travel experience and immerse yourself in a world of unrivaled luxury combined with adventure.

  • Northern Lights of Scandinavia (Small Groups, 10 Days) 10 Days, $4688.00
  • Northern Lights of Scandinavia (Classic, 10 Days) 10 Days, $4288.00
  • Scandinavian Northern Lights (9 Days) 9 Days, $2776.00

What are luxury tours like in Finland?

Finland

Here are the important factors:

  • 15 trip options analyzed
  • $383 average price per day (USD)
  • 5 to 10 days in length
  • 4.81 of 5 average rating
  • 25 people or less on average

Curious about the diverse range of luxury tours? Prepare to be amazed by the array of options available to suit every traveler's preferences. It comes as no surprise that visitors adore these tours, given their exceptional average guest rating of 4.81 out of 5 stars. When it comes to group sizes, the average maximum capacity stands at 25 people, allowing for a comfortable and sociable experience. The shortest tour is 5 days, while the longest is 10 days. As for physical activity options, the tours are thoughtfully categorized as moderate, easy, and serious, with the most being moderate. With a comprehensive analysis encompassing 15 luxury tours, you can rest assured that Finland has something tailored to your interests and preferences, promising an unforgettable experience for all.

(All tour prices are in US Dollars before taxes, and come from a base price that is reported by TourRadar. Peak season prices can vary significantly, particularly in destinations where seasonal travel fluctuates dramatically.)

So, let's get to it and see...

The 10 Best Luxury Tours in Finland

Northern lights of scandinavia (small groups, 10 days).

  • High Quality: guest ratings are higher than average.

This exceptional trip offering by Insight Vacations has received a 5 out of 5 rating. On this 10-day journey, visiting Finland and Norway, you can unwind while also making new memories. Along the way, this journey encompasses 6 destinations, including Honningsvag, Alta, Tromso, and Ivalo. Helsinki will mark the start of your journey, while Oslo will serve as its final destination. With a group size of 24 people, it's suitable for travelers from 5 and up. This extraordinary adventure also revolves around local culture and family-friendly activities. This remarkable trip is priced at an unbeatable $515 per day.

  • Coach / Bus
  • In-depth Cultural
  • Northern Lights

Northern Lights of Scandinavia (Classic, 10 Days)

Check out this journey that has received rave reviews, earning a stellar 5 out of 5 rating, visiting Finland and Norway. This itinerary covers 6 captivating destinations, with stops in Alta, Tromso, Ivalo, and Honningsvag, among others. Helsinki marks the starting point, while Oslo stands as the final stop on your incredible journey. This terrific trip also highights local culture and family-friendly activities. Spanning across 10 unforgettable days, this voyage offers an intimate group experience with 40 participants, and it's great for travelers from 5 and up. Brought to you by the renowned Insight Vacations , this exceptional opportunity is priced at an incredible $475 per day - an unbeatable value.

Scandinavian Northern Lights (9 Days)

  • Great Value: the daily price is lower than average for luxury tours.

This 9-day journey, visiting Finland and Sweden, is ideal for travelers from 5 and up. And priced at only $374 per day, it's a great value, too. You're in for an epic adventure with a strong emphasis on local culture and family-friendly activities. Immerse yourself in a travel experience that includes 9 destinations, featuring Saariselka, Rovaniemi, Kemi, and Lulea. Beginning in beautiful Helsinki, you'll have a terrific journey that ends in Stockholm. It's offered by Trafalgar , a very popular company with rave reviews and knowledgeable guides.

Aurora Borealis & Glass Igloo

Priced at just $319 per day, this terrific 5-day trip is ideal for travelers from 12 to 80 years old. Rovaniemi will be the beginning and end of your trip. Organized by the reputable V.O.S – Vision of Scandinavia , this is one of the best tours on this list.

  • Ski, Snowboard & Snow

Family Winter Adventure in Finland

Check out this incredible trip that has received a 5 out of 5 rating from previous guests. With a duration of 6 days, this journey ensures an intimate group size of 20 people, and is good for travelers from 4 and up. Begin and conclude your remarkable journey in the gorgeous destination of Rovaniemi. This fantastic option, organized by Adventure Apes , presents an unbeatable value at just $338 per day.

Finnish Lapland in Winter

Spanning over 8 days, this trip has a maximum size of 12 individuals. Welcoming travelers from 15 and up, it is organized by Intrepid Travel , a very popular company with plenty of great reviews. Beginning in beautiful Helsinki, you'll have a terrific journey that ends in Rovaniemi. Available at an unbeatable price of only $512 per day, this option also has a rating of 4.8 out of 5 stars from previous guests.

Finnish Winter Adventure Family Holiday

Here's your chance to take off on an exceptional voyage that has garnered a 4.6 out of 5 rating. With a duration of 8 days, this jouney will have 9 participants, and it warmly welcomes travelers from 9 and up. Expertly organized by Exodus Travels , this amazing trip is an incredible value at just $375 per day.

  • Polar Snow Shoeing

Skiing Expedition Hut to Hut in Pallas Ylläs National Park

This memorable trip is offered by Adventure Apes which has received plenty of positive reviews. The trip itself has a guest rating of 5 out of 5 stars, and is priced affordably at $357 per day. You'll start and end this amazing trip in Kittila. The maximum group size is 12 people, welcoming travelers from 16 and up.

Kayak expedition & wild camping in Lapland

Set off on an extraordinary journey that has been awarded a 4.9 out of 5 stars by previous guests. With a duration of 6 days, this journey offers an intimate group setting, accommodating 8 individuals, while extending a warm welcome to travelers from 18 and up. Kuusamo will be both the start and end of your journey. Brought to you by Adventure Apes , this exceptional deal is an incredible steal at a mere $300 per day.

Women Only Kayak expedition in Lapland

With this option you can experience an unparalleled voyage for 6 unforgettable days. It ensures an intimate group setting with 8 participants at most. Your adventure starts and ends in Kuusamo. Adventure Apes , the organizer of this journey, extends a warm invitation to guests travelers from 18 and up. This extraordinary opportunity offers exceptional value at only $300 per day.

  • Kayak & Canoe

See also The Best Family-Friendly Tours to Finland , The Best Wildlife Tours to Finland , The Best Hiking & Trekking Tours in Finland , The Best Historical Tours in Finland , The Best 10-Day Tours in Finland , The Best One Week (7-Day) Tours in Finland , The Best 3-Day Tours in Finland , Tours for Outdoor and Nature Lovers in Finland , The Best Christmas & New Years Tours in Finland , The Best Adventure Tours to Finland , The Best Eco Tours in Finland , The Best Thrill-Seeking Tours in Finland , The Best Cruise Tours and Packages in Finland , The Best Sightseeing Tours in Finland , The Best Cultural Tours in Finland , The Best Educational Tours in Finland , The Best Romantic Tours for Couples in Finland , The Best Polar Tours & Cruises in Finland , The Best Northern Lights Tours in Finland , The Best Tours Under $1000 in Finland , The Best Budget Tours to Finland , or The Best Tours for Seniors to Finland for more tour ideas. With so many options, there's a guided tour or vacation package for every type of traveler.

Also, if you're departing from a specific destination, see The Best One-Week (7-Day) Tours from Helsinki , The Best One-Week (7-Day) Tours from Kuusamo , or The Best 10-Day Tours from Helsinki for more package tour options.

How much do luxury tours cost in Finland?

After analyzing 15 luxury tours in Finland, we found the average price to be a remarkably economical $383 per day. Naturally, this region has many fantastic options for luxury tours with a variety of prices. The individual costs will vary by the destinations, travel style, available dates, and other factors. If you're interested in more information about tours here, see our guide to tour prices in Finland .

And for more information on Finland, see Finland Travel Costs and Finland Hotel Costs .

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Budget Your Trip

finland tour budget

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  1. How to travel to Finland on a budget?

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  2. 10 Best Budget Weekend Breaks in Finland

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  3. Budget Travel Guide to Rovaniemi in 2020

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  4. Finland: Budget Calculator & 8 Local Tips!? via @townandtourist

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  5. Budget Finland Travel Guide 8 Ways to Save More Money

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  6. Budget Finland Trip Cost

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VIDEO

  1. Things to do in Finland + Week in my life || living in Finland vlog

  2. Study In Finland: Course Duration, Intakes, Tuition Fees, Top Universities, & Scholarships

  3. Finland tour vlog 2023

  4. LUXURY IN FINLAND- $16.8 MILLION

  5. Finland tour:Dinner at Indian restaurant in Oulu

  6. Coolest Place in Helsinki!

COMMENTS

  1. Finland Travel Cost

    A one week trip to Finland usually costs around $1,204 (€1,100) for one person and $2,408 (€2,199) for two people. This includes accommodation, food, local transportation, and sightseeing. A two week trip to Finland on average costs around $2,408 (€2,199) for one person and $4,816 (€4,399) for two people.

  2. Finland on a budget

    How to visit Finland on a budget (the only guide you'll ever need) Kerry Walker Apr 26, 2022 • 10 min read Take in a spectacular view of the northern lights in Finland © Anton Petrus / Getty Images Let's face it: Finland is expensive - unless you happen to be coming from Sweden or Norway, that is.

  3. Finland Travel Guide (Updated 2024)

    Last Updated: August 9, 2023 Finland is a beautiful country. Home to epic mountains, scenic waterfalls, stunning fjords, plentiful saunas, and the chance to see the northern lights, it's an incredible destination perfect for outdoorsy travelers and adventure lovers.

  4. How much does a trip to Finland Cost?

    With two weeks, you should budget between $978 and $5,213 for your trip to Finland. The average price for a two week trip is $2,350. Two weeks will allow you enough time to visit between three and five places. If you're on a budget, you might want to consider some of the more affordable places such as Savonlinna and Levi.

  5. The Best Affordable Budget Tours to Finland

    After analyzing 4 budget tours in Finland, we found the average price to be a remarkably economical $99 per day. Naturally, this region has many fantastic options for budget tours with a variety of prices. The individual costs will vary by the destinations, travel style, available dates, and other factors.

  6. Finland Travel Cost Calculator. Figure Out Your Budget in 3 Minutes

    The average cost of a 7-day trip to Finland during off-season is US$677 | €613 for a solo traveler, US$847 | €767 for a couple. Hotels range from US$76 - 387 | €69 - 351 per night with an average of US$127 | €115. Travelers spend on average US$71 | €64 on meals per person per day in Finland. 1 day in Helsinki will cost you US$195 | €177.

  7. How Much Does a Trip to Finland Cost?

    Jan It's no surprise to learn that Finland does not account for the cheapest trip I've ever taken! Yes, being situated in Scandinavia - a region known for its high cost of living - it's fair to say Finland isn't a country usually associated with budget travel. In fact, this is probably why it's only recently that I've first stepped foot there!

  8. THE BEST Budget Tours & Trip Packages in Finland 2023/2024

    23 budget tours in Finland Starts Basecamp Oulanka, Finland Ends Basecamp Oulanka, Finland Snowshoeing in Finland of 24 reviews Best price guaranteed No booking fees " The holiday was fantastic. We saw the Northern Lights at the end of our first full day. Husky sleddi ... " Tour Type Small Group Tour

  9. Finland on budget: 17 easy tips to save money

    Finland on budget. If you plan a trip to Finland - go through this list, I am sure you would find something for you. 1. Make a list. Start with a list, and write down four things: Transport, Stay, Eat, See. When you go through this post - write down all the "Finland on budget" tips that are relevant to you. Transportation and route planning

  10. Is Finland Expensive? A Finland Trip Cost Guide

    Finland can be an expensive country to visit with an average cost of €85-320 per person per day. However, there are ways that you can save money in this gorgeous Nordic nation, as well. This article will give you the best idea of an average Finland trip cost as well as how to maximise your budget while visiting the happiest country in the world.

  11. How to Visit Finland on a Budget

    You need to plan carefully to get the best value for your money. It is possible to have an amazing trip on a budget! There are lots of free activities and attractions in Finland. For example, there are many beautiful lakes and forests. You can also visit museums, castles, and churches.

  12. How Much Does Finland Travel Cost? Here Is A Breakdown

    The average travel expense can range anywhere from 3,500 € to 7,500 €, though it largely depends on your travel style. This is what you might expect for a 1-week Lapland road trip and 3 days spent in Helsinki during winter. We estimated it based on a mix of hotel accommodations and popular activities including husky and reindeer safari.

  13. How Much Does a Trip to Finland Cost?

    On average, the price of a trip to Finland would be 121€ or 138$ a day. Here is a more detailed list of common expenses: Price of a simple meal: ~11€/12.5$. Price of dinner: ~30€/34$. Price of a city sightseeing Hop on - Hop off bus tour: 30€/34$. Price of a city tour: usually from ~20€/23$ for a classic tour in the city center to ...

  14. Budget Finland Travel Guide 8 Ways To Save More Money

    The Budget Finland Travel Guide includes 18 Important Travel Planning Tips that will allow you to see and do more on your budget. Learn how you can benefit. Welcome to the Finland Travel Guide! If you are one of those people who truly loves exploring the great outdoors then Finland must rank among the finest countries in Europe to visit.

  15. Finland travel

    From Lapland snow fun to Helsinki's trophy sights, get the lowdown on how to see Finland on a budget and make your euro stretch that bit further. Read article. Best Road Trips. Drive along seas and lakes - and even see Santa at work - on these fabulous Finland road trips. ... Budget Travel. Getting around in Finland: a beginners' guide ...

  16. The Prices of Tours to Finland

    Tours to Finland range in price from $295 to $8,999, based on data from 76 tours. This table shows the range of guided, organized, and all-inclusive tour prices that visit, start in, or end in Finland. If you're trying to figure out how much you should pay for an organized tour, this table breaks down the costs by price range.

  17. Best Finland Tours & Vacations 2024/2025

    USD $3,180 Add to my wishlist 15 Days · Original Scandinavia Explorer From USD $6,261 Add to my wishlist 21 Days · Original Complete Scandinavia From USD $8,740 Add to my wishlist 8 Days · Original Finnish Lapland in Winter From USD $4,115 Add to my wishlist 32 Days · Original Scandinavia & Baltic Circuit From USD $11,825 Add to my wishlist

  18. 10 Best Finland Tours & Trips 2024

    $349 From US$2,442 View tour Download Brochure View Map Educational Family Autumn Adventure in Kuusamo 4.9 (18 reviews) "The trip was fun, and it was a very cool experience overall."

  19. Things to know before traveling to Finland

    Finland is the kind of place a child with a particularly vivid imagination might dream up, complete with flying reindeer, ... You might also like: Capital gains: Helsinki on a budget Autumn in Finland: an alternative fall foliage tour Reindeer, bears and elusive seals: Finland's finest wildlife experiences. Explore related stories.

  20. 7 Memorable City Breaks In Finland

    As Finland's oldest city and its first capital, Turku is steeped in history. Turku Castle, a medieval fortress that now serves as a museum, and the Turku Cathedral, a national shrine that dates ...

  21. 10 Best Finland Tours & Trips 2024/2025 (with 102 Reviews)

    Finland Tour. - Excellent. Based on customer reviews. Delightful trip to a peaceful place. 5 - Excellent. Anonymous. "The remote forests of Finland are a very peaceful place, and tramping through them in snowshoes is an ideal way to immerse yourself in their tranquillity. The trees are laden with snow and you cannot hear a thing.

  22. 8 Best Places to See the Northern Lights in 2024

    Travel experts reveal the best places in the world to see the Northern Lights in 2024, from Iceland and Finland to the U.S. and Canada.

  23. The best islands in Europe for getting away from almost everyone

    In the Gulf of Bothnia between Sweden and Finland, the Åland archipelago has more than 6,500 islands, of which only about 60 are inhabited. To say there's room to stretch out and breathe on ...

  24. The Best One-Week (7-Day) Tours from Helsinki

    13 trip options analyzed. $457 average price per day (USD) 7 to 8 days in length. 4.75 of 5 average rating. 55 people or less on average. You'll be surprised at the array of one week tours from Helsinki in Finland, as there is something for everyone. It's no wonder that visitors can't get enough of these tours, boasting an impressive average ...

  25. Facing $50M budget gap, Sacramento city manager freezes hiring, travel

    Faced with a $50 million budget shortfall next year, Sacramento City Manager Howard Chan has instituted freezes on hiring, travel and office supplies.

  26. Best Finland Tours & Holidays 2024/2025

    Be immersed in Finnish culture on the streets of Helsinki or venture through world-class art displays. Book a Finland tour today. My Wishlist My Booking +1 510-379-4907 Destinations Ways to travel Deals ... How to budget travel in Scandinavia 21 Sep 2016. Finland at a glance. CAPITAL CITY. Helsinki (pop: 631,000) POPULATION. 5.5 million ...

  27. Finland's Air Traffic to Halt on Widespread Political Strikes

    Airports in Finland are set to close on Feb. 1 due to two-day political strikes that will wreak havoc across various industries. Finnair Oyj expects flight cancellations after unions in the Nordic ...

  28. The Best Luxury Tours to Finland

    The individual costs will vary by the destinations, travel style, available dates, and other factors. If you're interested in more information about tours here, see our guide to tour prices in Finland. And for more information on Finland, see Finland Travel Costs and Finland Hotel Costs.