• off.road.cc
  • Dealclincher
  • Fantasy Cycling

Support road.cc

Like this site? Help us to make it better.

  • Sportive and endurance bikes
  • Gravel and adventure bikes
  • Urban and hybrid bikes
  • Touring bikes
  • Cyclocross bikes
  • Electric bikes
  • Folding bikes
  • Fixed & singlespeed bikes
  • Children's bikes
  • Time trial bikes
  • Accessories - misc
  • Computer mounts
  • Bike bags & cases
  • Bottle cages
  • Child seats
  • Lights - front
  • Lights - rear
  • Lights - sets
  • Pumps & CO2 inflators
  • Puncture kits
  • Reflectives
  • Smart watches
  • Stands and racks
  • Arm & leg warmers
  • Base layers
  • Gloves - full finger
  • Gloves - mitts
  • Jerseys - casual
  • Jerseys - long sleeve
  • Jerseys - short sleeve
  • Shorts & 3/4s
  • Tights & longs
  • Bar tape & grips
  • Bottom brackets
  • Brake & gear cables
  • Brake & STI levers
  • Brake pads & spares
  • Cassettes & freewheels
  • Chainsets & chainrings
  • Derailleurs - front
  • Derailleurs - rear
  • Gear levers & shifters
  • Handlebars & extensions
  • Inner tubes
  • Quick releases & skewers
  • Energy & recovery bars
  • Energy & recovery drinks
  • Energy & recovery gels
  • Heart rate monitors
  • Hydration products
  • Hydration systems
  • Indoor trainers
  • Power measurement
  • Skincare & embrocation
  • Training - misc
  • Cleaning products
  • Lubrication
  • Tools - multitools
  • Tools - Portable
  • Tools - workshop
  • Books, Maps & DVDs
  • Camping and outdoor equipment
  • Gifts & misc

What the hell is neutral service at the Tour de France?

What the hell is neutral service at the Tour de France?

First Published Jul 14, 2023

Besides producing bicycle components, Shimano is also the neutral service provider for the Tour de France – taking over from Mavic in 2021 – along with other major Amaury Sport Organisation (A.S.O) races such as Paris-Roubaix and Liege-Bastogne-Liege. Everyone sees the blue cars following the race, but who and what is in them and what do they do?

Shimano has been running its neutral service since 2001, and in 2021 began providing neutral service at the Tour de France. Shimano now has six neutral service teams across Europe, covering the biggest professional road races in the world.

The blue neutral service cars are present at all three Grand Tours, the Tour de France Femmes, the World Championships, all five cycling monuments, and many other races on the UCI men's and women's calendars.

2023 Dauphine Shimano neutral support - 3.jpeg

In the Tour de France, each team has two cars following the peloton that are able to assist the riders throughout the race with a mechanic in the back seat and spare bikes on the roof. 

One car will stay near the team's GC contenders and the second car will stay further back. The team cars are assigned a specific number based on the overall GC rankings to keep them in order at the rear of the peloton. 

So, where do the blue Shimano cars fit into this? 

The blue Shimano cars and motorbike that you see amongst the team cars are also support vehicles that provide assistance to riders during the race, regardless of their team or equipment sponsors.

The Shimano squad in every race is made up of three cars and one assistance motorbike, making up what we refer to as the neutral service, with the primary purpose of ensuring all riders have access to support so they can carry on racing without too much interruption. 

2023 Dauphine Shimano neutral support - 1.jpeg

> Psssssst! What happens when a rider punctures in the Tour de France?

Two cars and the motorbike will be at the front of the race with the other car at the back behind the riders. 

In the event of a breakaway, the Shimano motorbike will follow first and when the gap is more than 35 seconds, one Shimano car will join the breakaway so the motorbike can return to the peloton.

> 2023 Tour de France bikes — your definitive guide to what the top pro cycling teams are riding this year

The responsibility of supporting riders falls primarily on the teams themselves and if a rider in the peloton gets a flat or needs water, their team car is radioed and allowed to drive to the front to help the rider. 

This system doesn't always work though, and when the race is split into multiple groups, Shimano's neutral service can help and acts as a backup option to ensure rider safety and fair competition. 

A closer look...

2023 Dauphine Shimano neutral support - 10.jpeg

The neutral service cars are essentially a mobile workshop and you'll see them with multiple bikes on the roof and spares inside the car too. 

Today’s peloton sees arguably the largest number of standards that there has ever been with brake types, different speed drivetrains and numerous integrated components so providing help is no easy task. 

"Shimano’s mechanics carry up to nine pairs of wheels, with two pairs for use with rim brakes, four pairs for use with Shimano’s disc brakes, including 140mm and 160mm rotors, as well two to three sets made for use with other manufacturers’ drivetrains," says Shimano.

> Should you run a 1x set-up on your road bike?

The motorbike is also equipped with extra wheels and Shimano's neutral service cars will also carry four to six spare bikes on the roof, covering four different frame sizes. 

Right now some teams race on 11-speed groupsets and some on 12-speed, some teams use 140mm disc rotors and some use 160mm and some combine both. Different teams also use different cleat systems so neutral service bikes are equipped with different pedals. 

2023 Dauphine Shimano neutral support - 8.jpeg

Shimano doesn't make bike frames, so all of the bikes that you'll see at races with neutral support provided by Shimano are made by another brand and rebadged.

As reported by  Cyclist , the current crop of neutral service bikes are from the little-known French brand Origine, and the framesets are its Axxome GT model (you can find it on the UCI's list of approved models of framesets). All bikes come fully equipped with Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 groupsets and Dura-Ace wheels, with the option of different wheel rim depths. 

During the Tour, one spare bike will always be set up for the GC leader and will be placed on the corner of the roof rack to ensure maximum accessibility. The other bikes have quick releases so that riders can adjust their saddle heights. 

Of course, riders would prefer to have access to their spare bike rather than waiting for a repair but would use neutral service if they are unable to get immediate assistance from their own team vehicles so that they can carry on in the race. 

What support can neutral service provide?

Mechanical support

As mentioned, neutral service vehicles provide mechanical support to riders who have been isolated by their team cars. If a rider experiences a mechanical issue during the race, neutral service is equipped with tools, spare parts, and experienced mechanics to help with bike repairs and adjustments. 

Shimano's mechanics are some of the best in business with decades of experience in the sport and some ex-pro racers. 

Wheel changes 

2023 Dauphine Shimano neutral support - 9.jpeg

> Best road bike wheels

With the many wheels loaded up onto the motorbike and inside the cars, riders can use neutral service to request a wheel change.

Shimano's mechanics can change a wheel in less than 30 seconds allowing the rider to continue without losing too much time. 

Spare bikes

In some cases, a rider may need to have a complete bike change to continue the race, and the neutral service bikes cater for all of the riders. 

We don't often see riders on the blue Shimano bikes from neutral service and when we do, riders will often only use it for a few miles or until they can get a bike from their team car. 

> Affordable* pro race bikes from Specialized, Canyon, Trek, Pinarello, Cannondale and more

Food and water supplies

Team cars can also provide nutrition and bottles to riders and neutral service cars include the provision of essential supplies too. 

There are designated areas in a race where riders can collect food and drink to replenish their energy which they would ideally get from their team cars. 

In the case of emergencies, neutral service often carries extra water bottles and energy gels that they can distribute to riders who require them. But, if you're anything like me, I like to know that I've trialled and tested the gels that I'm using. 

2023 Dauphine Shimano neutral support - 7.jpeg

> Best road bike saddles

Neutral service vehicles may be important for riders but, arguably, they’re even more important for all of us fans because they keep the action going. 

They are also a useful addition for team mechanics, as they often go to Shimano's neutral service if they encounter problems they can't fix. 

Have you noticed Shimano's neutral service at the Tour? Let us know in the comments section below...

Help us to fund our site

We’ve noticed you’re using an ad blocker. If you like road.cc, but you don’t like ads, please consider subscribing to the site to support us directly. As a subscriber you can read road.cc ad-free, from as little as £1.99. 

If you don’t want to subscribe, please turn your ad blocker off. The revenue from adverts helps to fund our site.

Help us to bring you the best cycling content

If you’ve enjoyed this article, then please consider subscribing to road.cc from as little as £1.99. Our mission is to bring you all the news that’s relevant to you as a cyclist, independent reviews, impartial buying advice and more. Your subscription will help us to do more.

neutral start tour de france

Emily is our track and road racing specialist, having represented Great Britain at the World and European Track Championships. With a National Title up her sleeve, Emily has just completed her Master’s in Sports Psychology at Loughborough University where she raced for Elite Development Team, Loughborough Lightning.

Emily is our go-to for all things training and when not riding or racing bikes, you can find her online shopping or booking flights…the rest of the office is now considering painting their nails to see if that’s the secret to going fast…

Add new comment

Latest comments.

Cycle storage suggestion: get three big wheely bins and plastic weld them together, then cut out the inner walls so it's one compartment....

I quite liked the term Sufferfest.  Tongue firmly in male humour cheek of course....

MoT failed on the 23rd Sept 23. ...

The police took the case forward for possible prosecution but have not informed me what the outcome was...

£499.00 from millets. I just had a small space in my bike shed to fit it in. Too cheap to leave on the shelf 🤣

Non-prescribed zebra crossings (just the road markings, no beacons) would encourage drivers to give priority to predestrians. They're fairly common...

Well... to mangle poetry: they're not waiting, but driving....

Oh dear, For some reason I thought it was a Team Time trial, like last year, and picked my teams based on that. Disaster looms.

For a bike thats worth 7k. The pictures sure dont do it justice. Im guessing the colour scheme will also be a little divisive. While I do...

I didn't particularly like him earlier in his career. But I'm warming to him now. I don't get the treatment of him here - if other riders said they...

neutral start tour de france

A Beginner’s Guide to the Tour de France: Part 2 – Stages and Tactics

  • People & Community
  • Jun 19, 2018

tour de france stages and tactics

Last week we examined how the Tour de France is actually several races in one and how at any given moment, different riders and teams have different objectives.

This week we are going to look at the different types of stages that the Tour throws up and the tactics teams employ to maximise their chances of success.

Types of stages

Of the 21 stages at this year’s Tour de France, 19 of them will be road stages. These are mass start stages where every one of the 176 riders push off together in a group, with the winner being the first across the line at the end of the day. These stages are usually preceded by a ‘neutral zone’ of a few kilometres where the riders roll through the host town behind a lead car, before being given the signal to begin racing in earnest once they are out onto clear roads.

Stage three of this year’s Tour will be a 35 kilometre team time trial (TTT). Team time trials can be thrilling affairs. Each team of eight is sent off at a designated time. Their objective is to complete the course in as quick a time as possible. However, the team must work together, slipstreaming each other and rotating turns to ensure that at least five of them finish together (the time is taken on the fifth rider across the line).

A strong rider must be careful not to destroy his own team by riding too hard when he is on the front. Riders can, and do get dropped, but it is essential for them to stay together for as long as possible. Having a core group of at least five riders that can finish the stage together is essential.

The team must be well drilled and its riders fully switched on. A lapse in concentration by a team member could bring the whole group down, which in turn, could spell the end of that team’s Tour chances. That is something you don’t want to happen just three stages in!

Stage 20 is an individual time trial (ITT) over 31 kilometres. As the name suggests, riders take on this course by themselves. They have a designated start time (usually leaving the start ramp at two or three minute intervals) with the winner being the rider who completes the course in the fastest possible time.

A rider is not allowed to draft or slipstream behind another rider, so if a faster competitor chases down a slower one, he must pull to the other side of the road and pass him as soon as possible.

Being the penultimate stage of the Tour the ITT will be the last opportunity for the general classification riders to make up time on their rivals. As such, it is fiercely contested, often resulting in a last minute shuffle of the leader’s board.

Team tactics

So, what can we expect to see from the teams once they are out on the roads?

The first few stages of this year’s Tour are flat stages and they will be dominated by the sprinters. The sprinters are the Tour’s fast men, and as they have no chance of winning the general classification, these early stages are their chance to shine. Not only can they pick up a couple of early wins for their teams, they also have the chance of slipping into the leader’s yellow jersey for a few days.

To make this happen, teams with genuine sprinters will form a ‘sprint train’ towards the end of the stage. With about 20 kilometres to go all available members of the team will begin to come together within the peloton. They will ride one behind the other (with their sprinter towards the back of their line) and come to the front of the group and begin to force the pace. This has two purposes. Firstly, there is less chance of becoming entangled within a crash if you are at the front of the group and, secondly, the increase in pace makes it harder for anyone else to break away and steal the sprint team’s glory!

This is a very frantic and exciting phase of the race. Often several ‘sprint trains’ will be jostling for position at the front of the peloton. Sometimes riders will even hitch a ride behind an opposition team’s train if their own has disintegrated or failed to gel. There is lots of pushing and bumping and it can all become very messy, not to mention dangerous, very quickly.

Remember all this is being done at ever increasing speeds, often upward of 50 kilometres an hour.

As the kilometre count comes down the ‘sprint train’ will lose its riders one by one. The rider setting the pace will peel off when he is spent and the next rider will take over and so on until only the sprinter and his final ‘lead-out’ man are left.

This final lead-out man will bury himself in the last few hundred metres, his sprinter tucked right on his wheel sheltering from the wind. Then the sprinter will launch himself around his lead-out man and kick for the line at speeds in excess of 60 kilometres per hour. If the timing is right and all goes to plan, the sprinter will have time to raise his arms in a victory salute as he crosses the line.

If this happens in stage one, then the winner will also be the first leader of the race and get to wear the prestigious yellow jersey.

While every team covets the yellow jersey, it brings with it a responsibility. You see, once you have won the yellow jersey, you need to defend it.

For every subsequent stage, your team becomes a target for all the other teams. If a breakaway manages to establish a lead over the peloton, it is the yellow jersey wearing team’s responsibility to chase it down. No one else will help. Their attitude is, “we don’t care if the break gets away, you are the ones who will lose the yellow jersey.”

And that’s why you’ll see the team with the yellow jersey out front of the peloton on most stages, setting the pace and protecting their leader at the same time. It is hard work and uses precious energy.

The only time the leading team won’t chase is if it gets one of its own riders in the breakaway. Usually they won’t chase down on of their own riders. If it is a flat stage a team with a genuine sprinter may then take up the chase, not wanting to see a potential stage victory disappear.

If it is a mountain stage however, as long as the riders in the breakaway are no threat to the overall lead, then all the general classification contenders – including the yellow jersey wearer – will let the break go, knowing it will have no effect on their positions.

The mountain stages can be quite confusing to watch. The general classification riders tend to only mark each other. Stage wins, while gratifying when they come along, are not the priority. Not losing time to your closest rivals is the GC rider’s biggest concern.

So while a small breakaway may battle it out for the stage win in the mountains, the real, more important battle is happening behind them, as the GC riders attack and mark each other up the latter parts of the climb.

Like I said early, the Tour de France is really several races in one. And yes, it can be confusing. But don’t let that put you off watching.

The Tour is a beautiful event. The scenery alone draws thousands of casual viewers each year. The bike racing can also be beautiful. The drama unfolds over a three week period revealing story after story. Stories of riders, stories of race routes, stories of climbs, of weather, of heartache and glory.

It’s an addictive story though, so be prepared for some late nights and early mornings.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Plese login to comment

Shimano releases more detail about Tour de France neutral service takeover

Japanese component manufacturer replacing Mavic to provide neutral service at all A.S.O. races, starting with Paris-Nice in March

  • Sign up to our newsletter Newsletter

Shimano neutral service

Following yesterday’s announcement by Amaury Sport Organisation (A.S.O.), the organiser of the Tour de France , that Shimano would be replacing Mavic as the provider of neutral service at most of the world’s top bike races, the Japanese component manufacturer has made its own announcement about the new agreement.

>>> Mavic will not provide neutral service at the Tour de France for the first time since 1977

A.S.O. also owns La Vuelta as well as Paris-Nice and the Critérium du Dauphiné, as well as prestigious one-day Classics such as Paris-Roubaix , Liège-Bastogne-Liège, Flèche Wallonne and Paris-Tours.

“The iconic blue of Shimano will adorn the neutral support cars in all A.S.O. WorldTour, Continental and Women’s races, offering all riders assistance to get back on the road as quickly as possible in the event of a crash or mechanical issue no matter which drivetrain brand they use,” reads Shimano’s press release.

Shimano is not a newcomer to neutral support: the blue cars have already been a feature of races for 20 years, a programme which originated at Spring Classics such as the Tour of Flanders and Amstel Gold, progressing to the Vuelta, where Shimano already had a strong working relationship with the A.S.O., and latterly to the Giro d’Italia.

Shimano will also be supporting selected international amateur events such as L'Etape du Tour and Roc d'Azur.

Taizo Shimano, executive vice president, said: “In the one hundredth year of our existence we are very excited to start a new chapter in our sports history. We are proud to announce a partnership to support the A.S.O.’s events with neutral support. That means we will be providing first-class support to riders at A.S.O. events to get them back on the road and back in the race.

“Shimano’s role is to inspire people to participate in sports and to keep bicycles running at their best. The vital neutral support role, especially at cycling’s most high-pressurized race – and also at one of the world’s most-watched sporting events – will allow us to do just that.

“Working with A.S.O. will allow Shimano to provide more support to the sport and more support to athletes to help them perform at the top level.

“As a company we take great pride in the quality of work that the thousands of global Shimano dealers carry out. This partnership with A.S.O. is the best example of the service that they provide. Not only do we hope this partnership will inspire a new generation of people to ride their bikes more often, but we hope to inspire people to trust in our product quality.”

Yann Le Moënner, managing director of Amaury Sport Organisation, said: "We are incredibly pleased to have extended our partnership with a player as innovative as Shimano. Partnering up on all of our professional and amateur cycling events with a family business and pioneer in the cycling world testifies to our commitment to offering excellent support to athletes as well as all of the cyclists involved in our events. The innovation and consistent level of excellence provided by the brand over its 100 years of existence make Shimano a crucial player in world and everyday cycling and a brand that we are proud to be associated with."

Shimano first engagement for A.S.O. this year comes at Paris-Nice starting in Saint-Cyr-l'École, France on Sunday March 7.

Thank you for reading 20 articles this month* Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

Join now for unlimited access

Try first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Get The Leadout Newsletter

The latest race content, interviews, features, reviews and expert buying guides, direct to your inbox!

Simon Smythe is a hugely experienced cycling tech writer, who has been writing for Cycling Weekly since 2003. Until recently he was our senior tech writer. In his cycling career Simon has mostly focused on time trialling with a national medal, a few open wins and his club's 30-mile record in his palmares. These days he spends most of his time testing road bikes, or on a tandem doing the school run with his younger son.

No longer riding at Elite level and seeing his training hours drop from 20 to sometimes just three, cycling coach and personal trainer Andy set out to see if he could still come home with the goods

By Andy Turner Published 19 February 24

Evenepoel starts season in fine form ahead of Tour de France debut this summer

By Tom Thewlis Published 19 February 24

Useful links

  • Tour de France
  • Giro d'Italia
  • Vuelta a España

Buyer's Guides

  • Best road bikes
  • Best gravel bikes
  • Best smart turbo trainers
  • Best cycling computers
  • Editor's Choice
  • Bike Reviews
  • Component Reviews
  • Clothing Reviews
  • Contact Future's experts
  • Terms and conditions
  • Privacy policy
  • Cookies policy

Cycling Weekly is part of Future plc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site . © Future Publishing Limited Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA. All rights reserved. England and Wales company registration number 2008885.

neutral start tour de france

Official games

PRO CYCLING MANAGER 2023 (PC)

2023 Edition

  • Stage winners
  • All the videos

Tour Culture

  • Commitments
  • key figures
  • Sporting Stakes
  • "Maillot Jaune" Collection
  • The jerseys

UCI Logo

Shimano Blue for neutral support at Tour de France

Key points:

  • Building on their historical La Vuelta partnership, Shimano and A.S.O. now extend their collaboration on Le Tour de France, prestigious classics such as Paris-Roubaix, Liège-Bastogne-Liège, Flèche Wallonne, Paris-Tours and also events such as L’Etape du Tour de France and Roc d’Azur.    
  • Riders in all A.S.O. women’s and men’s races to be supported by Shimano’s world class neutral support team.

With Shimano celebrating it’s centenary year in 2021, the partnership will see the brand leveraging 20 years of neutral support experience and know-how to support all riders in selected A.S.O. races, no matter which drivetrain brand they use, helping them to get their bikes operating at the optimum level. The iconic blue of Shimano will adorn the neutral support cars in all A.S.O. World Tour, Continental and Women’s races, offering all riders assistance to get back on the road as quickly as possible in the event of a crash or mechanical issue. 

Taizo Shimano, Executive Vice President said “In the one hundredth year of our existence we are very excited to start a new chapter in our sports history. We are proud to announce a partnership to support the A.S.O.’s events with neutral support. That means we will be providing first-class support to riders at A.S.O. events to get them back on the road and back in the race.

“Shimano’s role is to inspire people to participate in sports and to keep bicycles running at their best. The vital neutral support role, especially at cycling’s most high-pressurized race – and also at the world’s most-watched sporting event – will allow us to do just that.

“Working with A.S.O. will allow Shimano to provide more support to the sport and more support to athletes to help them perform at the top level.

“As a company we take great pride in the quality of work that the thousands of global Shimano dealers carry out. This partnership with A.S.O. is the best example of the service that they provide. Not only do we hope this partnership will inspire a new generation of people to ride their bikes more often, but we hope to inspire people to trust in our product quality.”

Yann Le Moënner   - Managing Director of Amaury Sport Organisation:  "We are incredibly pleased to have extended our partnership with a player as innovative as Shimano. Partnering up on all of our professional and amateur cycling events with a family business and pioneer in the cycling world testifies to our commitment to offering excellent support to athletes as well as all of the cyclists involved in our events.

The innovation and consistent level of excellence provided by the brand over its 100 years of existence make Shimano a crucial player in world and everyday cycling and a brand that we are proud to be associated with."

Thierry Gouvenou – Head of cycling race organization department at A.S.O. said “Having Shimano on board is a huge statement about the quality of races we offer. We have complete trust in the Shimano team to deliver a professional service towards teams and riders, as they have been doing for much of their 100-year history.”

Shimano first engagement for A.S.O. this year comes at Paris–Nice starting in Saint-Cyr-l'École, France on Sunday 7 th March 2021.

About Shimano Europe : Founded in 1921, Shimano is dedicated to helping its customers get closer to nature, supporting people to realize their dreams and create new lifestyles. That comes with the desire to create outstanding cycling products and apparel.

With almost 100 years’ experience in creating internationally renowned bicycle components, Shimano is proud to have developed products that continue to take countless athletes to victory and provide the means for limitless global bicycle journeys. For more information see www.shimano.com .

neutral start tour de france

You may also enjoy

Biogents becomes "official protector" of the Tour de France image

Biogents becomes "official protector" of the Tour de France

La Vache qui rit® returns as official supplier of the Tour de France image

La Vache qui rit® returns as official supplier of the Tour de France

Follow in the tracks of cycling legends image

Follow in the tracks of cycling legends

Receive exclusive news about the Tour

app uk

Accreditations

Privacy policy, your gdpr rights.

  • International edition
  • Australia edition
  • Europe edition

Tour de France 2023: Rodríguez wins stage 14 as Vingegaard keeps yellow – as it happened

Team Ineos won a second straight stage while Jonas Vingegaard survived a cat-and-mouse battle with Tadej Pogacar to stay in yellow

  • 15 Jul 2023 The top five on General Classification after stage 14
  • 15 Jul 2023 The top five in stage 14
  • 15 Jul 2023 Rodriguez takes the win on stage 14!!
  • 15 Jul 2023 Ciccone is awarded today's most combative rider
  • 15 Jul 2023 Stage 14 withdrawals
  • 15 Jul 2023 Ramon Sinkeldam of Alpecin-Deceunick abandons
  • 15 Jul 2023 Ciccone wins the intermediate sprint
  • 15 Jul 2023 Romain Bardet has crashed heavily on the descent and has abandoned
  • 15 Jul 2023 Esteban Chaves of EF Education Easypost has abandoned
  • 15 Jul 2023 The race has restarted
  • 15 Jul 2023 Louis Meintjes of Team Intermarché–Circus–Wanty has withdrawn
  • 15 Jul 2023 Antonio Pedrero of Movistar Team has abandoned
  • 15 Jul 2023 Race temporarily stopped following mass crash
  • 15 Jul 2023 Huge crash with lots of riders down
  • 15 Jul 2023 They're racing on stage 14
  • 15 Jul 2023 Today’s roll-out has begun
  • 15 Jul 2023 Who's in what jersey?
  • 15 Jul 2023 Michal Kwiatkowski climbs to stage 13 win as Pogacar cuts gap to Vingegaard
  • 15 Jul 2023 The top five on General Classification
  • 15 Jul 2023 Stage 14, Saturday 15 July: Annemasse-Morzine, 152km

Carlos Rodriguez Cano of Spain and Team INEOS Grenadiers celebrates at finish line as stage winner.

Stage 14 report: Tadej Pogacar and Jonas Vingegaard crossed swords again in their vintage duel at the Tour de France as the Danish defending champion gained just one second over the two-times winner at the end of an epic, incident-packed stage.

Slovenian Pogacar beat Vingegaard in the sprint for second place behind stage winner Carlos Rodríguez of Team Ineos but now trails the Dane, who picked up an extra bonus second, by 10 seconds.

The top five on General Classification after stage 14

Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma) 57hr 47min 28sec

Tadej Pogacar (UAE Emirates) +10sec

Carlos Rodriguez (Ineos Grenadiers) +4min 43sec

Jai Hindley (Bora-Hansgrohe) +4min 44sec

Adam Yates (Bahrain Victorious) +5min 20sec

Rodriguez has just been speaking to reporters about today’s stage win. The Spanish rider who is celebrating his first Tour de France stage victory says:

“It’s incredible. Being here was a dream, getting a victory is incredible in the best race of the world. It’s something I’ve always wanted to achieve and now I’ve got a victory.

[I’m] super happy, super grateful and happy for the team for all their work and believing in me. It wouldn’t have been possible without them.”

Asked if he thought the stage win would be possible when he was dropped going up Col de Joux Plane, he says honestly: “no.” He says he wanted to take advantage of the descent, which he was confident on and again praises his team, and in particular yesterday’s stage winner and fellow Ineos Grenadier rider, Michel Kwiatkowski.

“Tomorrow is going to be a big day also,” he says.

The top five in stage 14

1.Carlos Rodriguez 3hr 58min 45sec 2. Tadej Pogacar +5sec 3. Jonas Vingegaard +5sec 4. Adam Yates +10sec 5. Sepp Kuss +57sec

If you like racing stats and an interesting fact to share with your friends, take a look at this on today’s stage winner, Carlos Rodriguez.

With an average speed of 58.6 km/h from the last summit to the finish, @_rccarlos becomes the youngest 🇪🇸 Spanish stage winner in @LeTour history at 22 years, 5 months and 13 days #TDFdata #TDF2023 https://t.co/2WU8OXFqdt — letourdata (@letourdata) July 15, 2023
🏆🇪🇸 @_rccarlos wins in Morzine! 🏆🇪🇸 @_rccarlos s’impose à Morzine ! #TDF2023 pic.twitter.com/RD6mKZ7RsB — Tour de France™ (@LeTour) July 15, 2023

Rodriguez takes the win on stage 14!!

The 22-year-old crosses the line first. Pogacar crosses ahead of Vingegaard to gain one precious second in the GC.

Grenadiers’ Spanish rider Carlos Rordriguez Cano cycles to the finish line to win the 14th stage.

1km to go: Rodriguez has played a blinder on the descent so far. He’s been flying down with maximum speeds of 95kmh.

Ciccone is awarded today's most combative rider

Lidl-Trek’s Giulio Ciccone has been awarded the combativity prize.

5km to go: Pogacar and Vingegaard are glued to each other, so it doesn’t look like there’ll be huge changes at the top of the GC today despite all the excitement. Rodriguez, though, is extending his lead and if he wins, it will be two stage wins in a row for Ineos Grenadiers.

8km to go: Rodriguez looks hungry for the stage win as he attacks on the descent. He could make some big gains on the GC here.

10km to go: Rodriguez and Adam Yates have managed to get back to Pogacar and Vingegaard. The four of them start the final descent together.

12km to go: Vingegaard attacks over the top of the climb but Pogacar immediately counters. They’re back together quickly. It’s an epic battle.

12km to go: Oh no. Pogacar tries to attack but gets blocked by the motorbike and the throngs of fans on the roadside.

13km to go: It’s cagey at the moment. Will one of them attack before the top of the climb? I am loving the roadside excitement and outfits. There’s a man in a flamingo inflatable.

Rodriguez is now 45sec back and Hindley is at almost 2min. These front two are on a different level.

13km to go: Vingegaard has caught Pogacar. Will he counter attack? It looks like he’s winding it up…

14km to go: It’s 2.3km to go to the top of the climb and the gap is stabilising around 4-5sec. This is too close to call and the fans on the roadside are loving it.

15km to go: Vingegaard looks to be clawing his way back. Has Pogacar gone too early?

15km to go : Pogacar attacks. Vingegaard can’t hold on. Big move.

16km to go: It’s around 4km to the top of the Col de Joux Plane, and have to say, it’s looking like one tough day at the office for the riders.

16km to go: Hindley and Rodriguez have now been dropped. Adam Yates is putting in a big turn for Pogacar, while Vingegaard sticks close to his rival’s wheel.

17km to go: Of the other teams’ GC contenders, only Hindley and Rodriguez remain. Gall has just dropped off.

20km to go: We now have the familiar sight of Sepp Kuss pushing hard on the front with Vingegaard on his wheel and Pogacar close behind. Which one is going to attack first?

Declan from Galway emailed earlier to say he was at the foot of the Col de Joux Plane in a bar, which sounded lovely. He says he is “thankfully out of the heat” and had ridden over to Morzine and back this morning.

German cycling fan Didi Senft.

21km to go: Pello Bilbao has been dropped along with Simon Yates.

21km to go: Wout van Aert looked like he was dropped but found a burst of energy and has accelerated to the front. Putting in a final dig it seems.

22km to go: David Gaudu and Simon Yates are struggling as Rafał Majka comes to the front to set the pace for UAE Team Emirates.

23km to go: Here’s an update on the GC riders still in the front group:

Jonas Vingegaard (Jumbo-Visma)

Tadej Pogacar (UAE Emirates) +9sec

Jai Hindley (Bora-Hansgrohe) +2min 51sec

Carlos Rodriguez (Ineos Grenadiers) +4min 48sec

Adam Yates (UAE Emirates) +5min 03sec

Simon Yates (Team Jayco–AlUla) +5min 04sec

Pello Bilbao (Bahrain Victorious) +5min 25sec

David Gaudu Groupama–FDJ +6min 52sec

Sepp Kuss (Jumbo-Visma) +07min 11sec

Felix Gall (AG2R Citroën T) +10min 33sec

Guillaume Martin +10min 46sec

Col de Jeux Plane: The one we’ve all been waiting for…the hors catégorie Col de Jeux Plane is a beast. It stretches for 11.6km and has an average gradient of 8.5% but a maximum gradient of 14%. Ouch. It promises to make the riders suffer, especially following those three first category climbs they’ve already pedalled up. It’s coming up in about 7km.

36km to go: Simon Yates (Team Jayco–AlUla) has also been dropped from the GC group and is 13sec behind. He’ll need to catch them before the base of the Col de Jeux Plane.

39km to go: Pidcock has failed to catch the GC group on the descent and now they’re on flatter terrain the gap is going out. He’s going to lose time today.

45km to go: Now we’re beating treated to footage of Pidcock descending. It’s a beautiful sight.

50km to go: Wout van Aert brings the GC group over the top of the climb, opening up a 30sec gap over Pidcock. What a performance from the Belgian.

51km to go: Pidcock has now dropped off the group with 1km to go. He’ll have to put those descending skills to the test if he’s going to get back to the group.

53km to go: Pidcock has managed to hold on during the steepest part of the climb. Will he be able to stay with the main group and go over the top with them?

59km to go: Tom Pidcock looks to be struggling with the high pace but is clinging on to the back of the GC group. There’s 4.5km to go.

Stage 14 withdrawals

Following a heavy crash in the very early kilometres of today’s stage, plus a few more falls, there have been quite a number of withdrawals from the Tour.

Here are all the official withdrawals so far, according to the official Le Tour website:

Esteban Chaves (EF Education-EasyPost)

James Shaw (EF Education-EasyPost)

Ramon Sinkeldram (Alpecin-Deceunink)

Louis Meintjes (Intermarché-Circus-Wanty)

Antonio Pedrero (Movistar Team)

Romain Bardet (Team DSM-Firmenich)

57km to go: Ciccone is finally caught and the GC battle can begin in earnest.

59km to go: A last throw of the dice for Ciccone as he attacks Woods, who is swiftly swallowed up by the peloton.

Wonder woman support: Clear who she supports.

Look away Ian from Dublin. Here’s one last glance at the Col de la Ramaz.

⛰ Next : the Col de la Ramaz! ⛰ Prochaine difficulté : le Col de la Ramaz ! #TDF2023 pic.twitter.com/gZ2FuIJ6uK — Tour de France™ (@LeTour) July 15, 2023

60km to go: Ciccone and Woods are the last two remaining members of the breakaway as Jumbo-Visma continue to push a high pace.

62km to go: Ciccone isn’t giving up. He knows he can get to within two points of Powless on the mountain classification if he makes it to the top of this climb first. He has Woods for company.

Lidl - Trek's Giulio Ciccone cycles past in a breakaway during the 14th stage of the Tour de France 2023.

64km to go: The riders have hit the Col de la Ramaz. Jumbo-Visma have already knocked off another 20sec to leave the breakaway looking rather doomed. Ciccone and Woods aren’t giving up yet though.

Ramon Sinkeldam of Alpecin-Deceunick abandons

Have heard Ramon Sinkeldam of Alpecin-Deceunick has also abandoned the Tour today. Not sure why yet but will update once there’s some additional info.

70km to go: It’s tough for the breakaway at the moment as the peloton are holding them at around 30sec. It’s difficult to see them staying away once the riders hit Col de la Ramaz.

Col de la Ramaz: Coming up next is the first category Col de la Ramaz, which is 1,619m high with an average gradient of 7.1% and 13.9 kilometres in length. It’s coming up in about 11km.

Ian from Dublin has emailed to say that this stage was used in last week’s Etape du Tour, which he rode. He’s not ready to see the Col de la Ramaz again so soon, it would seem.

Ciccone wins the intermediate sprint

81km to go: Ciccone clearly has good legs today and has taken the 20 points for the intermediate sprint. It won’t bother Philipsen though, as clearly it isn’t a day for the sprinters.

The results are:

Giulio Ciccone, 20 pts

Alex Aranburu, 17 pts

Michael Woods, 15 pts

Lidl–Trek’s Giulio Ciccone.

Earlier I asked how you’re all watching today’s stage of the Tour. Here are some of the replies, with each very much setting the scene. Paulo is in a very hot Andalucia, Roger is over in the USA and cheering for Powless and Matthew has detailed his breakfast. It was a lump of French toast and bacon with (French) Canadian syrup, I’m told. Also, Aiden has tweeted from the Swedish island of Gotland to say hello.

88km to go: Led by Jumbo-Visma, the peloton have increased the pace and have reduced the gap to less than 20sec from the breakaway. Perhaps they are planning something on the next climb…

89km to go: Those ten points have moved Ciccone to within 12 points of Powless on the mountains classification jersey. Powless will have to dig deep to hold onto that polka dot jersey, with plenty of points yet play for today.

We’ll give you a round-up of who’s abandoned today at some point. I know there’s a few of you asking.

Justin from Bristol has emailed to pose a question: “Can I ask the audience, what’s been the most impactful accident in TdF history? Either the one that’s caused the most retirements, or the one that’s taken out the most Top 10 riders.” Thoughts?

97km to go: The gap to the peloton has gone over a minute for the first time today. Predicting some fireworks to come later in the stage with two big categorised climbs left to come: Col de La Rambaz and the Col de Joux Plane.

A spectator wearing traditional attire holds a Danish national flag along the race route.

99km to go: Ciccone played that very cleverly, sitting on Woods’ wheel and attacking with 200m to go to get those 10 sweet points. Woods rolls over to take eight, before Landa and Pinot take six and four points respectively.

100km to go: Ciccone and Woods have gone clear, searching for the maximum mountain points. Who’s going to get the ten?

  • Tour de France 2023
  • Tour de France

Most viewed

  • >", "name": "top-nav-watch", "type": "link"}}' href="https://watch.outsideonline.com">Watch
  • >", "name": "top-nav-learn", "type": "link"}}' href="https://learn.outsideonline.com">Learn
  • >", "name": "top-nav-podcasts", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.outsideonline.com/podcast-directory/">Podcasts
  • >", "name": "top-nav-maps", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.gaiagps.com">Maps
  • >", "name": "top-nav-events", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.athletereg.com/events">Events
  • >", "name": "top-nav-shop", "type": "link"}}' href="https://shop.outsideonline.com">Shop
  • >", "name": "top-nav-buysell", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell">BuySell
  • >", "name": "top-nav-outside", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.outsideonline.com/outsideplus">Outside+

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? >", "name": "mega-signin", "type": "link"}}' class="u-color--red-dark u-font--xs u-text-transform--upper u-font-weight--bold">Sign In

Outside watch, outside learn.

  • >", "name": "mega-backpacker-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.backpacker.com/">Backpacker
  • >", "name": "mega-climbing-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.climbing.com/">Climbing
  • >", "name": "mega-flyfilmtour-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://flyfilmtour.com/">Fly Fishing Film Tour
  • >", "name": "mega-gaiagps-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.gaiagps.com/">Gaia GPS
  • >", "name": "mega-npt-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.nationalparktrips.com/">National Park Trips
  • >", "name": "mega-outsideonline-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.outsideonline.com/">Outside
  • >", "name": "mega-outsideio-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.outside.io/">Outside.io
  • >", "name": "mega-outsidetv-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://watch.outsideonline.com">Outside Watch
  • >", "name": "mega-ski-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.skimag.com/">Ski
  • >", "name": "mega-warrenmiller-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://warrenmiller.com/">Warren Miller Entertainment

Healthy Living

  • >", "name": "mega-ce-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.cleaneatingmag.com/">Clean Eating
  • >", "name": "mega-oxy-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.oxygenmag.com/">Oxygen
  • >", "name": "mega-vt-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.vegetariantimes.com/">Vegetarian Times
  • >", "name": "mega-yj-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.yogajournal.com/">Yoga Journal
  • >", "name": "mega-beta-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.betamtb.com/">Beta
  • >", "name": "mega-pinkbike-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.pinkbike.com/">Pinkbike
  • >", "name": "mega-roll-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.rollmassif.com/">Roll Massif
  • >", "name": "mega-trailforks-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.trailforks.com/">Trailforks
  • >", "name": "mega-trail-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://trailrunnermag.com/">Trail Runner
  • >", "name": "mega-tri-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.triathlete.com/">Triathlete
  • >", "name": "mega-vn-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://velo.outsideonline.com/">Velo
  • >", "name": "mega-wr-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.womensrunning.com/">Women's Running
  • >", "name": "mega-athletereg-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.athletereg.com/">athleteReg
  • >", "name": "mega-bicycleretailer-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.bicycleretailer.com/">Bicycle Retailer & Industry News
  • >", "name": "mega-cairn-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.getcairn.com/">Cairn
  • >", "name": "mega-finisherpix-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.finisherpix.com/">FinisherPix
  • >", "name": "mega-idea-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.ideafit.com/">Idea
  • >", "name": "mega-nastar-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.nastar.com/">NASTAR
  • >", "name": "mega-shop-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.outsideinc.com/outside-books/">Outside Books
  • >", "name": "mega-obj-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.outsidebusinessjournal.com/">Outside Business Journal
  • >", "name": "mega-veloswap-link", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.veloswap.com/">VeloSwap
  • >", "name": "mega-backpacker-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.backpacker.com/">Backpacker
  • >", "name": "mega-climbing-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.climbing.com/">Climbing
  • >", "name": "mega-flyfilmtour-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://flyfilmtour.com/">Fly Fishing Film Tour
  • >", "name": "mega-gaiagps-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.gaiagps.com/">Gaia GPS
  • >", "name": "mega-npt-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.nationalparktrips.com/">National Park Trips
  • >", "name": "mega-outsideonline-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.outsideonline.com/">Outside
  • >", "name": "mega-outsidetv-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://watch.outsideonline.com">Watch
  • >", "name": "mega-ski-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.skimag.com/">Ski
  • >", "name": "mega-warrenmiller-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://warrenmiller.com/">Warren Miller Entertainment
  • >", "name": "mega-ce-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.cleaneatingmag.com/">Clean Eating
  • >", "name": "mega-oxy-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.oxygenmag.com/">Oxygen
  • >", "name": "mega-vt-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.vegetariantimes.com/">Vegetarian Times
  • >", "name": "mega-yj-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.yogajournal.com/">Yoga Journal
  • >", "name": "mega-beta-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.betamtb.com/">Beta
  • >", "name": "mega-roll-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.rollmassif.com/">Roll Massif
  • >", "name": "mega-trail-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://trailrunnermag.com/">Trail Runner
  • >", "name": "mega-tri-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.triathlete.com/">Triathlete
  • >", "name": "mega-vn-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://velo.outsideonline.com/">Velo
  • >", "name": "mega-wr-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.womensrunning.com/">Women's Running
  • >", "name": "mega-athletereg-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.athletereg.com/">athleteReg
  • >", "name": "mega-bicycleretailer-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.bicycleretailer.com/">Bicycle Retailer & Industry News
  • >", "name": "mega-finisherpix-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.finisherpix.com/">FinisherPix
  • >", "name": "mega-idea-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.ideafit.com/">Idea
  • >", "name": "mega-nastar-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.nastar.com/">NASTAR
  • >", "name": "mega-obj-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.outsideonline.com/business-journal/">Outside Business Journal
  • >", "name": "mega-shop-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://shop.outsideonline.com/">Outside Shop
  • >", "name": "mega-vp-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.velopress.com/">VeloPress
  • >", "name": "mega-veloswap-link-accordion", "type": "link"}}' href="https://www.veloswap.com/">VeloSwap

2-FOR-1 GA TICKETS WITH OUTSIDE+

Don’t miss Thundercat, Fleet Foxes, and more at the Outside Festival.

GET TICKETS NOW

TICKETS NOW ON SALE!

Outside Festival feat. Thundercat, Fleet Foxes, and more.

GET EARLY-BIRD DEALS

Shimano takes over neutral support at Tour de France

Deal across all aso races marks end of era for mavic and its iconic yellow vehicles..

Heading out the door? Read this article on the new Outside+ app available now on iOS devices for members! >","name":"in-content-cta","type":"link"}}'>Download the app .

Shimano will be taking over the neutral support role at the Tour de France and other marquee races in 2021, replacing longtime partner Mavic that began race support with its distinctive yellow vehicles in the 1970s.

  • Mavic saved by French investment group
  • Shimano patents suggest wireless, 12-speed coming

ASO officials confirmed Tuesday that Shimano, the Japanese component maker that provides neutral support at the Vuelta a España, will provide neutral support at the Tour and ASO’s other fleet of men’s and women’s races, including Paris-Roubaix .

Details of the deal were not revealed, but Mavic was struggling in 2020 before new owners stepped in to save the historic brand.  The new partnership comes as Shimano will celebrate its centenary in 2021.

“We have complete trust in the Shimano team to deliver a professional service towards teams and riders, as they have been doing for much of their 100-year history,” said Thierry Gouvenou, ASO’s heading of cycling.

Mavic neutral service car

The new partnership will end the Tour’s long association with Mavic for neutral support. The French company helped to pioneer the concept of neutral support at major pro bike races. For decades, riders had to repair their own punctures and deal with other mechanical problems. Eventually, the idea of neutral support was fully embraced, and by the 1970s, Mavic’s support vehicles soon became part of the caravan. It was not immediately known if Mavic is continuing its neutral support role at other events.

Officials said Tuesday that Shimano will provide neutral support cars in all of ASO’s WorldTour, continental, and women’s races, offering riders assistance to get back on the road as quickly as possible in the event of a crash, puncture, or mechanical issue.

“We are proud to announce a partnership to support the ASO’s events with neutral support. That means we will be providing first-class support to riders at ASO events to get them back on the road and back in the race,” said Taizo Shimano, executive vice president. “Shimano’s role is to inspire people to participate in sports and to keep bicycles running at their best. The vital neutral support role, especially at cycling’s most high-pressurized race – and also at the world’s most-watched sporting event – will allow us to do just that.”

The new partnership will begin at Paris-Nice, in March.

Popular on Velo

\n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/first-ride-factor-ostro-vam-2\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"first ride and build: the factor ostro vam is faster than a specialized tarmac\"}}\u0027>\n first ride and build: the factor ostro vam is faster than a specialized tarmac\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"weekend wrap: goodbye ur\u00e1n, hello rookie sensation luke lamperti","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/weekend-wrap-goodbye-uran-hello-sprint-sensation-luke-lamperti\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/weekend-wrap-goodbye-uran-hello-sprint-sensation-luke-lamperti\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"weekend wrap: goodbye ur\u00e1n, hello rookie sensation luke lamperti\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/weekend-wrap-goodbye-uran-hello-sprint-sensation-luke-lamperti\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"weekend wrap: goodbye ur\u00e1n, hello rookie sensation luke lamperti\"}}\u0027>\n weekend wrap: goodbye ur\u00e1n, hello rookie sensation luke lamperti\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"\u2018i\u2019m incredibly lucky to be alive\u2019: magnus sheffield shares emotions of tour de suisse tragedy","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/im-incredibly-lucky-to-be-alive-magnus-sheffield-shares-emotions-of-tour-de-suisse-tragedy\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/im-incredibly-lucky-to-be-alive-magnus-sheffield-shares-emotions-of-tour-de-suisse-tragedy\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"\u2018i\u2019m incredibly lucky to be alive\u2019: magnus sheffield shares emotions of tour de suisse tragedy\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/im-incredibly-lucky-to-be-alive-magnus-sheffield-shares-emotions-of-tour-de-suisse-tragedy\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"\u2018i\u2019m incredibly lucky to be alive\u2019: magnus sheffield shares emotions of tour de suisse tragedy\"}}\u0027>\n \u2018i\u2019m incredibly lucky to be alive\u2019: magnus sheffield shares emotions of tour de suisse tragedy\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"srm x-power road pedals spin +\/-2% power accuracy for shimano spd-sl","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/srm-x-power-road-pedals-spin-2-power-accuracy-for-shimano-spd-sl\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/srm-x-power-road-pedals-spin-2-power-accuracy-for-shimano-spd-sl\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"srm x-power road pedals spin +\/-2% power accuracy for shimano spd-sl\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/srm-x-power-road-pedals-spin-2-power-accuracy-for-shimano-spd-sl\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"srm x-power road pedals spin +\/-2% power accuracy for shimano spd-sl\"}}\u0027>\n srm x-power road pedals spin +\/-2% power accuracy for shimano spd-sl\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"laurens ten dam smashes transcordilleras ultra","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/gravel\/gravel-racing\/laurens-ten-dam-smashes-transcordilleras-ultra\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/gravel\/gravel-racing\/laurens-ten-dam-smashes-transcordilleras-ultra\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"laurens ten dam smashes transcordilleras ultra\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/gravel\/gravel-racing\/laurens-ten-dam-smashes-transcordilleras-ultra\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"laurens ten dam smashes transcordilleras ultra\"}}\u0027>\n laurens ten dam smashes transcordilleras ultra\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"mosaic gt-1 iar titanium all-road pushes 40mm clearance with full integration","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/gravel\/gravel-gear\/mosaic-gt-1-iar-titanium-all-road-pushes-40mm-clearance-with-full-integration\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/gravel\/gravel-gear\/mosaic-gt-1-iar-titanium-all-road-pushes-40mm-clearance-with-full-integration\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"mosaic gt-1 iar titanium all-road pushes 40mm clearance with full integration\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/gravel\/gravel-gear\/mosaic-gt-1-iar-titanium-all-road-pushes-40mm-clearance-with-full-integration\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"mosaic gt-1 iar titanium all-road pushes 40mm clearance with full integration\"}}\u0027>\n mosaic gt-1 iar titanium all-road pushes 40mm clearance with full integration\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"last for wout van aert, fast for sepp kuss as puncture deflates chances at cl\u00e1sica ja\u00e9n","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/last-for-van-aert-and-fast-for-kuss-as-puncture-deflates-chances-at-clasica-jaen\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/last-for-van-aert-and-fast-for-kuss-as-puncture-deflates-chances-at-clasica-jaen\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"last for wout van aert, fast for sepp kuss as puncture deflates chances at cl\u00e1sica ja\u00e9n\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/last-for-van-aert-and-fast-for-kuss-as-puncture-deflates-chances-at-clasica-jaen\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"last for wout van aert, fast for sepp kuss as puncture deflates chances at cl\u00e1sica ja\u00e9n\"}}\u0027>\n last for wout van aert, fast for sepp kuss as puncture deflates chances at cl\u00e1sica ja\u00e9n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"adam yates flattens field to win tour of oman, luke lamperti leaves on a high","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/adams-yates-flattens-field-to-win-tour-of-oman-luke-lamperti-leaves-on-a-high\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/adams-yates-flattens-field-to-win-tour-of-oman-luke-lamperti-leaves-on-a-high\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"adam yates flattens field to win tour of oman, luke lamperti leaves on a high\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/adams-yates-flattens-field-to-win-tour-of-oman-luke-lamperti-leaves-on-a-high\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"adam yates flattens field to win tour of oman, luke lamperti leaves on a high\"}}\u0027>\n adam yates flattens field to win tour of oman, luke lamperti leaves on a high\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"how hard is it to stay on remco evenepoel\u2019s wheel spoiler: very.","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-culture\/how-hard-is-it-to-stay-on-remco-evenepoels-wheel-spoiler-very\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-culture\/how-hard-is-it-to-stay-on-remco-evenepoels-wheel-spoiler-very\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"how hard is it to stay on remco evenepoel\u2019s wheel spoiler: very.\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-culture\/how-hard-is-it-to-stay-on-remco-evenepoels-wheel-spoiler-very\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"how hard is it to stay on remco evenepoel\u2019s wheel spoiler: very.\"}}\u0027>\n how hard is it to stay on remco evenepoel\u2019s wheel spoiler: very.\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"rampaging remco evenepoel crushes rivals in first race of 2024","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/rampaging-remco-evenepoel-crushes-rivals-in-first-race-of-2024\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/rampaging-remco-evenepoel-crushes-rivals-in-first-race-of-2024\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"rampaging remco evenepoel crushes rivals in first race of 2024\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/rampaging-remco-evenepoel-crushes-rivals-in-first-race-of-2024\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"rampaging remco evenepoel crushes rivals in first race of 2024\"}}\u0027>\n rampaging remco evenepoel crushes rivals in first race of 2024\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"\u2018most rain i\u2019ve ever seen in a race:\u2019 monsoon deluge creates chaos at tour of oman","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/most-rain-ive-ever-seen-in-a-race-monsoon-deluge-creates-chaos-at-tour-of-oman\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/most-rain-ive-ever-seen-in-a-race-monsoon-deluge-creates-chaos-at-tour-of-oman\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"\u2018most rain i\u2019ve ever seen in a race:\u2019 monsoon deluge creates chaos at tour of oman\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/most-rain-ive-ever-seen-in-a-race-monsoon-deluge-creates-chaos-at-tour-of-oman\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"\u2018most rain i\u2019ve ever seen in a race:\u2019 monsoon deluge creates chaos at tour of oman\"}}\u0027>\n \u2018most rain i\u2019ve ever seen in a race:\u2019 monsoon deluge creates chaos at tour of oman\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"4iiii precision 3+ pro power meter with apple find my tracking review: the dual-sided power meter i\u2019ve been waiting for","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/4iiii-precision-3-plus-pro-power-meter\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/4iiii-precision-3-plus-pro-power-meter\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"4iiii precision 3+ pro power meter with apple find my tracking review: the dual-sided power meter i\u2019ve been waiting for\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/4iiii-precision-3-plus-pro-power-meter\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"4iiii precision 3+ pro power meter with apple find my tracking review: the dual-sided power meter i\u2019ve been waiting for\"}}\u0027>\n 4iiii precision 3+ pro power meter with apple find my tracking review: the dual-sided power meter i\u2019ve been waiting for\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"double denim delight for alpecin-deceuninck with \u2018daring\u2019 2024 kits","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/double-denim-delight-for-alpecin-deceuninck-with-daring-2024-kits\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/double-denim-delight-for-alpecin-deceuninck-with-daring-2024-kits\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"double denim delight for alpecin-deceuninck with \u2018daring\u2019 2024 kits\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/double-denim-delight-for-alpecin-deceuninck-with-daring-2024-kits\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"double denim delight for alpecin-deceuninck with \u2018daring\u2019 2024 kits\"}}\u0027>\n double denim delight for alpecin-deceuninck with \u2018daring\u2019 2024 kits\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"pro bike gallery: bora hansgrohe\u2019s decked out sram equipped specialized tarmac sl8","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/pro-bike-gallery-bora-hansgrohes-decked-out-sram-equipped-specialized-tarmac-sl8\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/pro-bike-gallery-bora-hansgrohes-decked-out-sram-equipped-specialized-tarmac-sl8\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"pro bike gallery: bora hansgrohe\u2019s decked out sram equipped specialized tarmac sl8\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/pro-bike-gallery-bora-hansgrohes-decked-out-sram-equipped-specialized-tarmac-sl8\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"pro bike gallery: bora hansgrohe\u2019s decked out sram equipped specialized tarmac sl8\"}}\u0027>\n pro bike gallery: bora hansgrohe\u2019s decked out sram equipped specialized tarmac sl8\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"review: specialized\u2019s new propero 4 helmet and torch 3.0 road shoes move upmarket","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/review-specialized-torch-3-0-propero-4-helmet\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/review-specialized-torch-3-0-propero-4-helmet\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"review: specialized\u2019s new propero 4 helmet and torch 3.0 road shoes move upmarket\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-gear\/review-specialized-torch-3-0-propero-4-helmet\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"review: specialized\u2019s new propero 4 helmet and torch 3.0 road shoes move upmarket\"}}\u0027>\n review: specialized\u2019s new propero 4 helmet and torch 3.0 road shoes move upmarket\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"cycling in abu dhabi is far more than just deserts and fast cars","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/urban\/urban-culture\/cycling-in-abu-dhabi\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/urban\/urban-culture\/cycling-in-abu-dhabi\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"cycling in abu dhabi is far more than just deserts and fast cars\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/urban\/urban-culture\/cycling-in-abu-dhabi\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"cycling in abu dhabi is far more than just deserts and fast cars\"}}\u0027>\n cycling in abu dhabi is far more than just deserts and fast cars\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"the unexpectedly exciting array of commuting, cargo, and urban bikes at velofollies","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/urban\/urban-gear\/the-unexpectedly-exciting-array-of-commuting-cargo-and-urban-bikes-at-velofollies\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/urban\/urban-gear\/the-unexpectedly-exciting-array-of-commuting-cargo-and-urban-bikes-at-velofollies\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"the unexpectedly exciting array of commuting, cargo, and urban bikes at velofollies\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/urban\/urban-gear\/the-unexpectedly-exciting-array-of-commuting-cargo-and-urban-bikes-at-velofollies\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"the unexpectedly exciting array of commuting, cargo, and urban bikes at velofollies\"}}\u0027>\n the unexpectedly exciting array of commuting, cargo, and urban bikes at velofollies\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"\u2018i\u2019m still beating my pbs\u2019: how geraint thomas keeps competitive into his 18th season","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/im-still-beating-my-pbs-how-geraint-thomas-keeps-competitive-into-his-18th-season\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/im-still-beating-my-pbs-how-geraint-thomas-keeps-competitive-into-his-18th-season\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"\u2018i\u2019m still beating my pbs\u2019: how geraint thomas keeps competitive into his 18th season\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/im-still-beating-my-pbs-how-geraint-thomas-keeps-competitive-into-his-18th-season\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"\u2018i\u2019m still beating my pbs\u2019: how geraint thomas keeps competitive into his 18th season\"}}\u0027>\n \u2018i\u2019m still beating my pbs\u2019: how geraint thomas keeps competitive into his 18th season\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"\u2018they\u2019re not some magic potion\u2019: why the controversy around ketones","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-training\/why-ketones-still-cause-consternation-in-pro-cycling\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-training\/why-ketones-still-cause-consternation-in-pro-cycling\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"\u2018they\u2019re not some magic potion\u2019: why the controversy around ketones\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-training\/why-ketones-still-cause-consternation-in-pro-cycling\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"\u2018they\u2019re not some magic potion\u2019: why the controversy around ketones\"}}\u0027>\n \u2018they\u2019re not some magic potion\u2019: why the controversy around ketones\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "},{"title":"tom pidcock\u2019s unusual, unconventional approach: a mtb win days before the volta a algarve","url":"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/tom-pidcocks-unusual-unconventional-approach-a-mtb-win-days-before-the-volta-a-algarve\/","markup":" \n \n\n\n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/tom-pidcocks-unusual-unconventional-approach-a-mtb-win-days-before-the-volta-a-algarve\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"tom pidcock\u2019s unusual, unconventional approach: a mtb win days before the volta a algarve\"}}\u0027>\n \n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n\n \n\n \n \n\n \n \n >\", \"path\": \"https:\/\/velo.outsideonline.com\/road\/road-racing\/tom-pidcocks-unusual-unconventional-approach-a-mtb-win-days-before-the-volta-a-algarve\/\", \"listing_type\": \"recirc\", \"location\": \"list\", \"title\": \"tom pidcock\u2019s unusual, unconventional approach: a mtb win days before the volta a algarve\"}}\u0027>\n tom pidcock\u2019s unusual, unconventional approach: a mtb win days before the volta a algarve\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n \n \n \n \n\n \n "}]' > >", "name": "footer-menu", "type": "link"}}'>advertise >", "name": "footer-menu", "type": "link"}}'>privacy policy >", "name": "footer-menu", "type": "link"}}'>contact >", "name": "footer-menu", "type": "link"}}'>careers >", "name": "footer-menu", "type": "link"}}'>terms of use >", "name": "footer-menu", "type": "link"}}'>site map manage cookie preferences privacy request healthy living.

  • Clean Eating
  • Vegetarian Times
  • Yoga Journal
  • Fly Fishing Film Tour
  • National Park Trips
  • Warren Miller
  • Fastest Known Time
  • Trail Runner
  • Women's Running
  • Bicycle Retailer & Industry News
  • FinisherPix
  • Outside Events Cycling Series
  • Outside Shop

© 2024 Outside Interactive, Inc

What Is the Average Speed of a Tour de France Rider? Plus More FAQs

Even if you are tuning in for the first time, these facts will make you look like a seasoned viewer of the TdF.

106th tour de france 2019   stage 19

As you get ready to watch the 2023 Tour de France, you might have some questions. This information will transform you—quickly—into a Tour expert. First, the basics: The 110th Tour de France will take place from July 1 - July 23. It’s good to know that the route changes every year. And in 2023, the Grand Départ is in the Basque Country of Spain, with the typical finish in Paris after 21 stages.

How fast do riders go?

tour de france speed

We have looked into this ! A Tour pro’s ability to produce more power for longer means that they can really hammer over different types of races and terrains.

Average Time Trial Speed Average Rider: 19 to 20 mph | Tour Pro: 29 to 31 mph Average Speed on Flat Terrain Average Rider: 17 to 18 mph | Tour Pro: 25 to 28 mph Maximum Sprint Power

Average Rider: 600 to 800 watts | Tour Pro: 1,200 to 1,400 watts

Why do so few Americans compete in the Tour de France?

rocamadour, france july 23 neilson powless of united states and team ef education easypost sprints during the 109th tour de france 2022, stage 20 a 40,7km individual time trial from lacapelle marival to rocamadour tdf2022 worldtour on july 23, 2022 in rocamadour, france photo by michael steelegetty images

In 2022, there were seven Americans in the Tour. As of the middle of June, start lists aren’t finalized, but viewers will most likely see Neilson Powless (EF Education-EasyPost), Sepp Kuss (Jumbo-Visma), and Matteo Jorgenson (Movistar).

Christopher Thompson, author of The Tour de France: A Cultural History , believes fewer Americans race professionally because the U.S. has historically seen cycling as more of a pastime than a competitive endeavor. In Europe, it is more common for children to be trained in competitive racing, and it’s hard for American racers to compete with that training

Also, the cost of competing for an American is higher: Racers need to go where the big races are, and that almost always means moving to Europe.

How much prize money does the Tour de France winner get?

paris, france july 24 jonas vingegaard rasmussen of denmark and team jumbo visma yellow leader jersey celebrates at finish line as overall race winner during the 109th tour de france 2022, stage 21 a 115,6km stage from paris la défense to paris champs Élysées tdf2022 worldtour on july 24, 2022 in paris, france photo by yoan valat poolgetty images

According to the Tour de France website, a total of around 2.3 million Euros will be awarded to the teams and riders, including 500,000 Euros to the winner of the final individual general classification (who usually shares his money with his team). That is equal to roughly $537,000 (USD). Second place GC is awarded 200,000 Euros, third place GC walks away with 100,000 Euros, and so on. Other top prizes go to stage winners, who get 11,000 Euros, and the winners of the points classification and mountains classification, both of whom receive 25,000 Euros. Riders can also win money during intermediate sprints and certain climbs. There’s even prizes for the five best teams and the four best young riders.

Who has won the most Tour de France titles?

france july 08 the belgian cycling champion finishing a stage photo by keystone francegamma keystone via getty images

That depends whether you’re counting titles that have been taken away ( cough — Lance — cough ). If not, the answer is a four-way tie between Jacques Anquetil, Miguel Indurain, Eddy Merckx, and Bernard Hinault, says Thompson.

Has the Tour ever been cancelled?

wwii tour de france

Only the two World Wars caused the race to be put on hold, says Thompson. All in all, battles cost the world 11 editions of the Tour: WWI broke out a few days after the 1914 Tour, he says, and didn’t run again until 1919. It went on hiatus again during WWII from 1940 to 1946, running again in 1947—two years after the end of the war.

“WWI was a war of attrition and the French were fighting the whole time. There were several Tour winners who were killed in the trenches,” he says. “But in WWII, France was defeated and occupied quite early, and that was different. There was a government that went along with the Nazis, so there was some racing to prove that things were normal under the occupation, but the Tour wasn’t held. After, France was so devastated by WWII that it took a while to get restarted.”

The Tour was postponed in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but eventually held in August of that year.

​Why is the leader’s jersey yellow?

la auto tour de france

Simple, says Thompson: L’Auto , the newspaper that first started and sponsored the race, was printed on yellow paper, so it was essentially an advertising strategy. (That’s also why the Giro d’Italia leader’s jersey is pink —the newspaper that created the Giro was printed on pink paper.) By the way, yellow in French is jaune and the jersey is called maillot jaune .

How do they make the jerseys so quickly?

preview for Exclusive: Watch How the Tour Yellow Jerseys Get Made So Quickly

There are four jerseys awarded during the course of the Tour de France each year and because who wears them gets decided during the race, they have to made on the spot and in a moment.

Has anyone ever died in the Tour?

tour de france 16

Sadly, yes. Four riders have passed away over the course of the race’s history. In 1910, Adolphe Heliére drowned on a rest day; in 1934, Francisco Cepeda crashed into a ravine on a descent; in 1967, Tom Simpson passed away after a heart attack ; and in 1995, Fabio Casartelli was killed after crashing and hitting his head.

Unfortunately, there have also been a number of horrific crashes. To see how grueling the race is, even for those who don’t fall or crash, watch Unchained on Netflix.

​What do Tour riders do on rest days?

109th tour de france 2022 rest day 3

They ride! At least, they go for short rides to keep their legs from cramping up. Max Testa , M.D., former team doctor for a variety of Tour teams including Team BMC, 7-Eleven, and Motorola, says that the short rides (which can be up to three hours!) help keep inflammation at bay and keep muscles ready for another hard day in the saddle.

Is there a women’s Tour de France?

1st tour de france femmes 2022 stage 8

After a number of iterations over the years, the 2023 Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift will be held from Sunday, July 23 to Sunday, July 30. The course is 594 miles and includes a mountain stage, four flat stages, two hilly stages, and the time trial. They will not race at all in Paris.

Who were the oldest and youngest Tour cyclists?

henri cornet, french racing cyclist 1906

Both distinctions occurred in 1904: Henri Paret was the oldest competitor at age 50 when he competed in 1904, while 20-year-old Henri Cornet was the youngest. Cornet was also the youngest winner. The oldest winner was in 1922, when 36-year-old Belgian Firmin Lambot took the yellow jersey.

Do racers make their stage data public?

wout van aert and his stage 16 strava data from the 2022 tour de france

Sometimes—but don’t count on them spending their evenings uploading their numbers . Still, you can keep an eye on some top pros’ Strava accounts.

How much do Tour de France bikes weigh?

topshot cycling den tdf2022 stage2

In the 1900s, a Tour de France cyclist pedaled up and down mountains on a bike that weighed a whopping 40 pounds. In fact, Fiets, a Dutch cycling magazine, showcased a bike from the 1903 race weighing 39.7 pounds with a fixed gear. Today, bikes weigh just under 15 pounds—but not any lower, since the UCI’s minimum bike weight is 6.8kg, which translates to 14.99 pounds.

What tire pressures do the cyclists run?

109th tour de france 2022 stage 5

Every racer and mechanic has a specific (top-secret) tire pressure that they considers to be optimal, but there are some guidelines.

“In general, with all of those variables [like weather and riders’ personal preference], that tire pressure is 8 to 8.5 bar for the road stages, and then 9.5 to 10 bar for the time-trial stages. Around 115 psi in the front and 125 psi in the back for the road stages and 130-135 psi for time-trial stages. And we drop that by 10 or 15 for rainy days,” Geoff Brown, veteran mechanic for Garmin-Sharp and EF Education First teams tells Bicycling .

They run about 10 psi lower in the front for more control, as well, and with tubular tires , they tend to run slightly lower pressures. Clinchers need to be kept around 110 to 120 psi in order to avoid pinch-flatting.

How do the competitors go to the bathroom?

cycling 99th tour de france 2012 stage 5

It’s a long, hot ride so the pros are hydrating a lot. In the first five to 10 minutes of a race, when the pace is more leisurely, “riders pull to the side of the road, pull their shorts down just like you would underwear—you know, pull front down, do your business,” says retired pro cyclist Ted King, who’s ridden the Tour de France several times.

During this neutral roll out, King says, there’s plenty of time to catch back on to the peloton before the race starts in earnest. Fortunately, nature calls for all riders. “It’s a lot easier to wait for a lull in the race when a big fraction of the peloton pulls to the side of the road rather than doing it solo, because that solo chase is tough!” King says.

Of course, riders also pee off the bike while riding, although it requires having their teammates pedal while they go. “If peeing to the right, your right leg is in a 6 o’clock position, left at 12. Left hand on the handlebars, right hand holds the shorts down, and coast while relieving yourself,” King advises.

Molly writes about cycling, nutrition and training, with an emphasis on women in sport. Her new middle-grade series, Shred Girls, debuts with Rodale Kids/Random House in 2019 with "Lindsay's Joyride." Her other books include "Mud, Snow and Cyclocross," "Saddle, Sore" and "Fuel Your Ride." Her work has been published in magazines like Bicycling, Outside and Nylon. She co-hosts The Consummate Athlete Podcast.

.css-1t6om3g:before{width:1.75rem;height:1.75rem;margin:0 0.625rem -0.125rem 0;content:'';display:inline-block;-webkit-background-size:1.25rem;background-size:1.25rem;background-color:#F8D811;color:#000;background-repeat:no-repeat;-webkit-background-position:center;background-position:center;}.loaded .css-1t6om3g:before{background-image:url(/_assets/design-tokens/bicycling/static/images/chevron-design-element.c42d609.svg);} Beginner Cycling

cycle race

Make Riding More Fun With These Beginner Tips

young woman rides gravel bicycle on rural track

6 Tips to Help You Crush Your Next Long Ride

two women riding bikes

How to Become a Better Cyclist

a group of bicyclists racing down a street

The Best Bike Events to Know About in 2024

types of bikes

All of the Different Types of Bikes—Explained

clipless pedals, cycling cadence

Does Ideal Cadence Really Exist?

low section focus on shadow cyclist team cycling in morning

What to Know About Cycling for Weight Loss

two people riding road bikes up a climb

Everything You Need to Get Started in Road Biking

friends riding gravel bikes on dirt trail on winter evening

10 Tips to Keep Cycling Through Winter

cycling is happiness

How to Start a Consistent Cycling Routine

norco mountain bike clinic

5 Beginner Mountain Biking Clinics for Women

Cyclingnews Forum

  • Forums New posts Trending Search forums
  • What's new New posts Latest activity
  • Members Current visitors Trophies

Neutral zone question...

  • Thread starter SetonHallPirate
  • Start date Jul 4, 2013
  • Professional Road Racing

SetonHallPirate

  • Jul 4, 2013

In the Tour de France today (Stage 6, 2013, in case this thread gets bumped up three or four years from now), there is a 9.9 km neutral section. I understand the need for a neutral section, because I'd imagine there's some sort of jockeying for position to allow a rider to get into a break the instant the flag gets pulled in, but why on earth does it need to be 10 km long? Meant as a serious question. Somebody who's ridden a road bike competitively more than I have (which is to say, for at least 15 seconds in their life) could answer that question better than I could, I assume.  

woodie

SetonHallPirate said: In the Tour de France today (Stage 6, 2013, in case this thread gets bumped up three or four years from now), there is a 9.9 km neutral section. I understand the need for a neutral section, because I'd imagine there's some sort of jockeying for position to allow a rider to get into a break the instant the flag gets pulled in, but why on earth does it need to be 10 km long? Meant as a serious question. Somebody who's ridden a road bike competitively more than I have (which is to say, for at least 15 seconds in their life) could answer that question better than I could, I assume. Click to expand...

Yep... starts are usually at a significant public place, often the middle of town. Convention for safety is to start on wide open roads, so the neutral is as long as it takes to get on a good road which fits in with the course.  

Ney the Viking

T-Nielsen

Ney the Viking said: Also, the riders get to warmup and spectators get to see their favourite riders at a normal pace instead of *ZOOM* "Hey was that an Ogre or a Vacansoleil guy that went past?" Click to expand...

RedheadDane

RedheadDane

  • Jul 5, 2013

It's probably in the vein of the riders need to get into position bit, but isn't it quite hard for your legs to go full smash from K-0?  

One Eyed Aussie

Euskaltel!

La Vuelta in 2011 had a 37km neutralised section going down Sierra Nevada...  

Euskaltel! said: La Vuelta in 2011 had a 37km neutralised section going down Sierra Nevada... Click to expand...
  • Jul 6, 2013

I think there was a TdF stage some years back that started at the top of Alpe d'Huez and was neutral until Bourg-d'Oisans - though that is far less than 37km.  

One Eyed Aussie said: If that was the planned neutral zone from the beginning of the stage that will be hard to beat. Click to expand...

TRENDING THREADS

neutral start tour de france

  • Started by Berniece
  • Feb 12, 2024
  • Replies: 798

neutral start tour de france

  • Started by DNP-Old
  • May 6, 2018
  • Replies: 23K

sartoris

  • Started by sartoris
  • Jun 9, 2012
  • Replies: 40K

neutral start tour de france

  • Started by Lequack
  • Replies: 258
  • Started by RedheadDane
  • Apr 30, 2020
  • Replies: 9K

neutral start tour de france

  • Started by Samamba
  • Feb 10, 2024
  • Replies: 254
  • Started by AmRacer
  • Yesterday at 4:36 PM
  • Replies: 36

Latest posts

neutral start tour de france

  • Latest: kn0s
  • 2 minutes ago
  • Latest: Shakes
  • 11 minutes ago
  • Latest: Extinction
  • 13 minutes ago

neutral start tour de france

  • Latest: Potomac
  • 15 minutes ago
  • Latest: frisenfruitig
  • 19 minutes ago

neutral start tour de france

  • 20 minutes ago

neutral start tour de france

  • 22 minutes ago

Moderators online

Eshnar

Share this page

neutral start tour de france

  • Advertising
  • Cookies Policies
  • Term & Conditions

neutral start tour de france

  • Subscribe to newsletter

It's going to be so great to have you with us! We just need your email address to keep in touch.

By submitting the form, I hereby give my consent to the processing of my personal data for the purpose of sending information about products, services and market research of ŠKODA AUTO as well as information about events, competitions, news and sending me festive greetings, including on the basis of how I use products and services. For customer data enrichment purpose ŠKODA AUTO may also share my personal data with third parties, such as Volkswagen Financial Services AG, your preferred dealer and also the importer responsible for your market. The list of third parties can be found here . You can withdraw your consent at any time.  Unsubscribe

A Primer on the Red Škoda ENYAQ iV, the Tour de France’s Leading Car

A Primer on the Red Škoda ENYAQ iV, the Tour de France’s Leading Car

Besides the Arc de Triomphe, the winding mountain climbs, and, of course, the peloton, the striking red leading car is one of the most characteristic symbols of the La Grande Boucle. Traditionally found at the launch of each stage and the tip of the peloton, the Tour director’s car serves as a ‘mobile captain’s bridge’ and is essential for the race’s organisational efforts. Let’s take a closer look!

The leading cars are basically headquarters on four wheels with one essential job: to chauffeur around the Tour directors. This year, it’s Christian Prudhomme and, after a 33-year hiatus, also a Tour de France Femmes director, Marion Rousse. In 2020, Škoda, the Tour’s sponsor for nearly two decades, introduced the all-electric Škoda ENYAQ iV as the leading car, the model being fresh off the assembly line at the time. As a harbinger of change, the ENYAQ iV was not only the first all-electric vehicle to lead the Tour de France peloton, but also Škoda’s first model using the modular electrification toolkit (MEB) as a powertrain in a bid for sustainability. After the initial run proved successful, the ENYAQ iV replaced the traditional leading Škoda SUPERBs for good.

The manufacturing of the leading cars falls into the “top secret” category, but we were lucky enough to learn a few details last year . The cars’ transformation takes place near Mladá Boleslav, the Czech Republic, under the skilled hands of Mr. Martin Smutný and others at Best Modell, a small specialised workshop. The changes the vehicles undergo before gaining their honourable role aren’t just cosmetic, although the external add-ons – the ‘Velvet Red’ paint job, the banners and decals, the yellow attachment above the windscreen, the six antennas – are usually the details you notice first.

In the workshop, the cars are stripped to the bone, rewired, reupholstered and fitted with a panoramic, retractable sunroof, a two-way radio and a communication console found between the car’s front seats, along with a mini-fridge for two bottles of Champagne accompanied by unique 3D-printed glass holders, and extra batteries to power all this additional hardware. The sunroof, which the builders say is the trickiest part to make, is used by the directors, who stand and wave the starting flag at ‘Kilometre Zero’ and also observe the peloton.

ENYAQ iV

Circling back to the built-in radio, it’s probably the most important piece of equipment that the cars carry. At an event of such massive proportions, communication is key. The race directors use the radio to receive race information and to communicate with their marshals (who also ride in ‘Velvet Red’ ENYAQ iVs ), as well as neutral support cars, and the individual team cars to give orders, advice and, if needed, the permission to break rank. The last situation happens when a rider has mechanical issues, has been injured (or sometimes both) and needs swift assistance. Since the riders’ starting positions in each stage depend on the current points and running order of their teams, a low ranking might mean a team car very far away from a rider in trouble. If requested, the Tour directors can give team cars permission to speed ahead to the rescue.

Last but not least, the leading cars serve as the representative office where the Tour directors receive their esteemed VIP guests, including the French president. Thanks to the abovementioned Champagne fridge and holders, they can treat their lucky visitors to a one-of-a-kind sightseeing tour of the, well, Tour, accompanied by refreshments.

With the Tour de France (1–24 July) underway and the Tour de France Femmes (24–31 July) coming soon, we are elated to get twice as much action this year. We hope you’ll join us in the grandest celebration of our beloved sport!

Articles you might like

evenepoel-wins-volta-ao-algarve-thanks-to-dominant-itt

Evenepoel Wins Volta ao Algarve Thanks to Dominant ITT

For a second-tier and 2.Pro race in late winter, the five-stage Volta ao Algarve boasted close to a Grand Tour lineup, with the likes of Remco Evenepoel, Geraint Thomas, Wout van Aert, Sepp Kuss, Ben Healy, and Tom Pidcock (to name just a few) at…

kopecky-reaches-another-pinnacle-and-lays-claim-to-being-the-worlds-best

Kopecky Reaches Another Pinnacle and Lays Claim to Being the World’s Best

Who wins track world championships like Filippo Ganna, road race world championships like Mathieu van der Poel, leads out like Danny van Poppel and climbs like Wout van Aert? Here’s a clue: it’s not a rider of the male persuasion.

stars-of-womens-cyclocross-the-seasons-top-talents

Stars of Women’s Cyclocross: The Season’s Top Talents

In the early 20th century, when Tour de France riders sought ways to maintain their fitness during the off-season, they inadvertently birthed a thrilling discipline known as cyclo-cross. Fast forward to the present day and this exhilarating autumn and winter sport has captured the hearts…

first-time-buyers-guide-our-top-road-bike-picks

First-Time Buyer’s Guide – Our Top Road Bike Picks

Do you want to cut straight to the chase? Here you go. In this article we will go over our top picks for your first road bike, what you may want to upgrade, what you need in a commuter city bike and which accessories you…

Tour de France in no position to shrug off climate action protest

'They're protesting about a good thing, but it's not great when it's at the front of the race'

French gendarmes remove environmental protestors from the race route as their protest action temporarily immobilized the pack of riders during the 10th stage of the 109th edition of the Tour de France

The bicycle may be a most ecologically-sound mode of transport, but the great bike race is a different proposition. While some attempts have been made to offset the event's carbon footprint in recent years, there is no escaping the sad fact that the Tour de France was not an altogether inappropriate target for peaceful environmental protests of the kind witnessed on stage 10 to Megève.

The logistics of bringing a rolling village of approximately 4,000 people around France has made it so. As of last year, ASO claims that 100% of the carbon emissions produced by the Tour organisation itself are offset, but those calculations do not factor in the emissions produced by the team staff, journalists, sponsors, corporate guests, fans and assorted suiveurs following the race across its three weeks.

In 2021, when QuickStep announced that they had become the WorldTour's first carbon-neutral team , they published a sobering calculation of the emissions they had needed to offset during the season. The estimated 1288 tons of CO2 produced by the team in a year is equivalent to driving a car 179 times around the world or making 539 return flights between Brussels and New York.

Silent Summer: pro cycling and the climate emergency - (Procycling long read) Tour de France stage 10 halted by climate action protestors Cort takes breakaway sprint to win Tour de France stage 10 at Megève

Such figures were far from the minds of the men chasing the stage victory from the breakaway on the road to Megève on Tuesday afternoon, and it was understandable that the riders in the move were more concerned with the stoppage itself than the message behind it when they spoke to reporters immediately after the finish.

Alberto Bettiol (EF Education-EasyPost) was alone at the head of the race with 37km remaining when he encountered the protestors from the 'Dernière Renovation' climate action group, which had made a similar demonstration at the French Open tennis earlier this year. The eight protestors sat in the road and set off a flare as the race approached, with some wearing t-shirts bearing the legend "We have 989 days left" in a call for urgent action on the climate crisis.

The Italian was able to ride past the protestors, as was the chasing group behind him, but it was clear that the body of the peloton – not to mention the cavalcade of cars behind them – would not be able to make it through safely. The commissaires quickly decided to stop the race until police had removed the protestors from the road. After a stoppage of 12 minutes or so, first Bettiol and then the chasers were allowed to set off with their buffers over the peloton intact.

"I saw them from a distance, and I knew something was up. I was able to get through, but I knew the bunch wouldn't be able to get through because there were quite a few of them and they were pretty determined," said Bettiol, who added that he was unaware that it had been a climate action protest. "These are things that happen, but they shouldn't happen, because in the end, we're working and they could do it differently."

Fred Wright (Bahrain Victorious) was in the group chasing Bettiol and, like the Italian, his first instinct was to squeeze through the gap and continue racing. "Your instant reaction is, 'OK, I need to get through this as quickly as I can,' but you forget there's loads of cars that also have to get past," Wright said.

Wright would proceed to ride strongly on the final climb to Megève in a bid to tee up teammate Luis Leon Sanchez for victory, though the spoils would ultimately fall to Bettiol's companion Magnus Cort. He explained, however, that the restart, which put him in mind of taking a break on a training ride, had been difficult to process.

"It was like when you stop at the café, the same feeling," Wright said. "I figured it was some kind of climate protest, and you almost know that straight away. They're protesting about a good thing, but it's not great when it's at the front of the Tour de France."

Wright's calm acknowledgement and understanding of the bigger issue contrasted with the lamentably blinkered view presented on France Télévisions' post-stage analysis programme Vélo Club, where the very cause the protestors were highlighting was – deliberately – not even mentioned.

"There's no question of talking about it, we're here to talk about cycling," said Laurent Jalabert. Then again, the Frenchman is no stranger to reticence when faced with uncomfortable questions. "There are 10,000 causes that could demonstrate on the race," he continued.

Tour director Christian Prudhomme made a brief appearance on the programme, where presenter Laurent Luyat limited himself to one vague question about the stoppage, but again, there was no discussion of the rationale behind it.

"It was unexpected and untimely. That happens on the roads of the Tour de France because it can be a big soap box," said Prudhomme. "That happens sometimes, but we're rarely blocked for a few minutes like that, and fortunately the race was able to start again. It happened at Rolland Garros, it happened at the Formula 1 at Silverstone, it happened in the German football league, and it happened again today here."

There was a time when there seemed to be a tacit accord between the Tour organisation and protestors who used the race to alert the watching public to their causes. Race director Jacques Goddet, so the saying went, was France's president for the month of July. And so, as the Tour travelled around the L'Hexagone, striking workers or protesting farmers would meet with the country's temporary premier, and a quid pro quo would invariably emerge – the protestors' grievances were given a public platform while the race continued largely unhindered.

That unspoken social contract seemed to break down 40 years ago, as the journalist Dan Perez outlined in L'Équipe earlier on this Tour. In 1982, steelworkers from Usinor protested the imminent closure of their plant in Denain, and their blockade caused a Tour stage to be cancelled for the very first time. In the four decades since the Tour's ear for social protest has closed like a fist. Witness, for instance, the tear gas police used to disperse a farmers' protest in the Aude in 2018.

"It was as if this episode marked the first division of the paths of workers and of cycling, which had for so long been intertwined," Perez wrote of the 1982 cancellation. "The Tour would certainly remain free, accessible to proletarians, but the athletes hurtling down the road on their bikes were starting to belong to them no longer."

Yet despite what Vélo Club would have us believe, the Tour, which uses France itself as its canvas, cannot pretend to exist in a vacuum. The television cameras that gladly show us France's picturesque chateaux and vineyards should not automatically turn away when faced with the concerns of its citizens. Team sponsors, meanwhile, include car manufacturers and petrostates , and there is clearly considerable work to be done to offset the overall carbon footprint of the Tour and of the sport as a whole.

"I don't really know the exact numbers of what's going on, but hopefully we're offsetting some of that by encouraging people to get on bikes and promoting a healthy lifestyle," Neilson Powless said when he arrived at the EF Education-EasyPost bus after the stage. Mercifully, Jalabert's head-in-the-sand approach is not shared by everybody in the contemporary peloton.

"I think it's going to be impossible to quantify anything, but I'm all for cleaning up the environment and everybody trying to do their part to offset their carbon footprint. Hopefully, it's going to get better in the next few years."

neutral start tour de france

Thank you for reading 5 articles in the past 30 days*

Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read any 5 articles for free in each 30-day period, this automatically resets

After your trial you will be billed £4.99 $7.99 €5.99 per month, cancel anytime. Or sign up for one year for just £49 $79 €59

neutral start tour de france

Try your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

Get The Leadout Newsletter

The latest race content, interviews, features, reviews and expert buying guides, direct to your inbox!

Barry Ryan

Barry Ryan is Head of Features at Cyclingnews. He has covered professional cycling since 2010, reporting from the Tour de France, Giro d’Italia and events from Argentina to Japan. His writing has appeared in The Independent, Procycling and Cycling Plus. He is the author of The Ascent: Sean Kelly, Stephen Roche and the Rise of Irish Cycling’s Golden Generation , published by Gill Books.

Spotted: New cycling shoes for Geraint Thomas at the Volta ao Algarve

'The body’s doing really well' – Geoghegan Hart upbeat after Volta ao Algarve return

'The goal is clear' - Jonas Vingegaard begins Tour build-up at O Gran Camiño

Most Popular

By Simone Giuliani February 18, 2024

By Laura Weislo February 17, 2024

By Alasdair Fotheringham February 17, 2024

By Peter Stuart February 17, 2024

By Kirsten Frattini February 16, 2024

By Alasdair Fotheringham February 16, 2024

By Jackie Tyson February 16, 2024

IMAGES

  1. Neutralised start

    neutral start tour de france

  2. Tour de France stage 16: Riders stop after cold downhill neutral start

    neutral start tour de france

  3. 10. etape af Tour de France blev midlertidigt neutraliseret, men er i

    neutral start tour de france

  4. Inside The Mavic Neutral Service Car & Scooter At The Tour De France

    neutral start tour de france

  5. Vorschau: 10. Etappe Tour de France 2021

    neutral start tour de france

  6. evitare arti Leggermente tour de france mapa Motivo orme circolazione

    neutral start tour de france

COMMENTS

  1. What the hell is neutral service at the Tour de France?

    Shimano has been running its neutral service since 2001, and in 2021 began providing neutral service at the Tour de France. Shimano now has six neutral service teams across Europe, covering the biggest professional road races in the world.

  2. Tour de France stage 16: Riders stop after cold downhill neutral start

    Tour de France stage 16: Riders stop after cold downhill neutral start By Patrick Fletcher published 13 July 2021 Riders union requested a brief stop for riders to remove layers Riders will...

  3. As it happened: Philipsen beats Cavendish to take Tour de France stage

    Hello and welcome to Cyclingnews' live coverage of stage 7 of the 2023 Tour de France, 169.9km from Mont-de-Marsan to Bordeaux. ... We're underway from the neutral start, the départ fictif, with ...

  4. A Beginner's Guide to the Tour de France: Part 2

    These stages are usually preceded by a 'neutral zone' of a few kilometres where the riders roll through the host town behind a lead car, before being given the signal to begin racing in earnest once they are out onto clear roads. Stage three of this year's Tour will be a 35 kilometre team time trial (TTT). Team time trials can be thrilling affairs.

  5. How a Tour de France Breakaway Happens

    Each road stage starts with what's called a neutral section or "depart fictif": a rolling start of up to about 10 kilometers where riders just get the legs moving, figure out what clothing or...

  6. Inside the Škoda Shimano Neutral Service Cars

    By We Love Cycling July 6, 2021 at 7:00 am 6 min reading The Škoda SUPERB service cars are getting a new paint job for the 2021 Tour de France. They are turning light blue as Shimano takes over from the yellow Mavic. This marks a new era in the neutral service car history.

  7. Tour de France: Konrad solos to victory on stage 16

    Austrian champion holds off breakaway companions in Saint-Gaudens. Patrick Konrad ( Bora-Hansgrohe) claimed the biggest win of his career on stage 16 of the Tour de France, celebrating a Pyrenean ...

  8. Shimano releases more detail about Tour de France neutral service

    By Simon Smythe. published January 20, 2021. Following yesterday's announcement by Amaury Sport Organisation (A.S.O.), the organiser of the Tour de France, that Shimano would be replacing Mavic ...

  9. Shimano Blue for neutral support at Tour de France

    Shimano Blue for neutral support at Tour de France Key points: Building on their historical La Vuelta partnership, Shimano and A.S.O. now extend their collaboration on Le Tour de France, prestigious classics such as Paris-Roubaix, Liège-Bastogne-Liège, Flèche Wallonne, Paris-Tours and also events such as L'Etape du Tour de France and Roc d'Azur.

  10. Tour de France 2023: Rodríguez wins stage 14 as ...

    Stage 14 report: Tadej Pogacar and Jonas Vingegaard crossed swords again in their vintage duel at the Tour de France as the Danish defending champion gained just one second over the two-times ...

  11. Quora

    We would like to show you a description here but the site won't allow us.

  12. The Tour de France: a guide to the basics

    The race and its various stages. The Tour goes on for three weeks, during which the riders cover about 3,500km in a rough circuit of the country. It is divided into 21 days of racing, with each ...

  13. Neutral Starts In The Tour De France

    In the Tour de France, a neutral start is a stage where the riders start together and are not timed until the official start of the stage. This usually occurs on the first stage of the race, but can also happen on other stages where the race organizers deem it necessary.

  14. Why Škoda Cars Are Integral to the Tour de France

    The 2021 edition of the Tour started on 26 th June in Brest in France's northwest and finishes, of course, at the Champs Élysées in Paris on 18 th July. There is a good chance that if you are watching, you are about to witness a piece of road-cycling history, as new records are broken every year.

  15. Shimano takes over neutral support at Tour de France

    Shimano will be taking over the neutral support role at the Tour de France and other marquee races in 2021, replacing longtime partner Mavic that began race support with its distinctive yellow vehicles in the 1970s.. Related: Mavic saved by French investment group; Shimano patents suggest wireless, 12-speed coming; ASO officials confirmed Tuesday that Shimano, the Japanese component maker that ...

  16. Tour de France stage 14 neutralised after early mass crash

    Pedrero, Chaves, Meintjes out of the race after multi-rider pileup, race resumes after 29 minutes. Louis Meintjes and Antonio Pedrero have abandoned the Tour de France after a mass crash in the ...

  17. Tour de France Average Speed- 2023 Tour de France FAQs

    First, the basics: The 110th Tour de France will take place from July 1 - July 23. It's good to know that the route changes every year. And in 2023, the Grand Départ is in the Basque Country...

  18. How Do They Go So Fast? The Technology Behind the Tour de France

    The secret to superhuman speed in the Tour de France is the peloton, the dense group of riders in a bike race. (Image by Eric Michelat from Pixabay.) The most efficient form of transportation ever invented is the bicycle. A bike makes moving a human from point A to point B almost effortless.

  19. 2024 Tour de France

    The 2024 Tour de France will be the 111th edition of the Tour de France.It will start in Florence, Italy on 29 June, and will finish in Nice, France on the 21 July.The race will not finish in (or near) Paris for the first time since its inception, owing to preparations for the Paris 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

  20. How Does The Tour de France Work? Beginner's Guide To Le Tour 2023

    The 2023 Tour de France will kick off with an explosive start in the Spanish Basque Country. Le Tour typically kicks off in a foreign country, before returning to France for the bulk of the route. It will feature a 22-kilometer time trial and a challenging course that includes five mountain ranges and a dizzying 30 climbs (compared to 23 last ...

  21. Neutral zone question...

    #2 SetonHallPirate said: In the Tour de France today (Stage 6, 2013, in case this thread gets bumped up three or four years from now), there is a 9.9 km neutral section.

  22. As it happened: Philipsen and Van der Poel combine again to win Tour de

    STAGE FINISH. Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin-Deceuninck) wins stage 4 of the Tour de France ahead of Caleb Ewan (Lotto-Dstny) by half a wheel. Bauhaus (Bahrain-Victorious) had another strong finish in ...

  23. A Primer on the Red Škoda ENYAQ iV, the Tour de France's Leading Car

    In 2020, Škoda, the Tour's sponsor for nearly two decades, introduced the all-electric Škoda ENYAQ iV as the leading car, the model being fresh off the assembly line at the time. As a harbinger of change, the ENYAQ iV was not only the first all-electric vehicle to lead the Tour de France peloton, but also Škoda's first model using the ...

  24. Tour de France in no position to shrug off climate action protest

    The logistics of bringing a rolling village of approximately 4,000 people around France has made it so. As of last year, ASO claims that 100% of the carbon emissions produced by the Tour ...