How to Turn a Raspberry Pi Into a VPN-Secured Travel Router

Want to secure your internet connection when traveling? Here's how to build a portable VPN router with a Raspberry Pi and OpenWRT.

Would you write your password on a piece of paper and stick it to your forehead? Probably not. Yet connecting to a public Wi-Fi network is almost as foolish.

You might not have any choice, however, if you're on the road and want to stay connected. A VPN can keep you safe, but each device has to connect separately, unless you're using a travel router as a go-between.

Don't have one handy? Don't worry, you can build one with a Raspberry Pi. It's the perfect choice for a DIY VPN travel router, so let's walk you through how to build one.

What You'll Need

To get started building a Raspberry Pi VPN travel router, you'll need:

  • Raspberry Pi (Pi 3 or Raspberry Pi Zero W preferred) with case
  • A single USB Wi-Fi adapter (two, if you're using an older Raspberry Pi)
  • A microSD card with at least 8GB storage
  • An SD card reader
  • A high-quality power supply
  • PC with an SSH client installed
  • A VPN subscription with OpenVPN support

It's possible to use Pi models without built in Wi-Fi , but you'll need two USB Wi-Fi adapters, or one capable of running in both managed/access point mode and client mode.

Instead of a standard Linux distribution, you'll need to install OpenWRT onto your SD card to turn it into a fully fledged router. You can use another Linux distro if you prefer, but OpenWRT provides a handy web interface for configuration when you're away from home.

If you're using Windows, you'll also need to install PuTTY or another SSH client for Windows before you get started.

Step 1: Install OpenWRT

First, download the OpenWRT firmware for your model of Raspberry Pi. You can find the most up-to-date images from the OpenWRT wiki .

Unzip the downloaded file using 7zip or another suitable file archive manager, then flash the IMG file to your card with Etcher .

This tool should detect your SD card automatically; you just need to select your image file, select the correct drive by letter, and then click  Flash.

Once it's done, place your microSD card back into your Raspberry Pi and let it boot.

Step 2: Initial Configuration

By default, OpenWRT defaults to a static IP address of 192.168.1.1 , which is the default gateway IP for many routers. You'll need to change this to prevent conflicts. Connect your Pi to your PC using an Ethernet cable; you may need to set a static IP on your PC first.

Rather than handle the configuration using LuCI, OpenWRT's web interface, you're going to do it manually to ensure that the configuration is set correctly. Load up PuTTY or your SSH client and connect to 192.168.1.1 first, with the username  root.  

You'll get an initial security warning on your first connection; just click  Yes and proceed. It's a good idea at this stage to set a password; do that by typing in

at the terminal window.

Configure the Network and Firewall Settings

You need to edit two files---

---before you can proceed any further. Start by typing the following to edit the file:

Next, tap I to edit the text and include the following:

Once you're done, hit the Esc key and type

to save and quit. Then switch attention to the firewall config file:

Tap I to edit, then find (or add) a zone for the WAN section, which should look like this:

Type  reboot   and wait as the Raspberry Pi reboots with a new IP address:  192.168.38.1 .

Step 3: Update and Install Packages

Next, you'll need to update OpenWRT. To do that, you're going to borrow the Pi's internal Wi-Fi and set it initially to connect to your existing Wi-Fi network. You may need to change your static IP address to  192.168.38.2 or a similar address in that range to allow you to connect.

Once connected, type the IP address of your Raspberry Pi into your browser to access the OpenWRT admin dashboard. Use your username and password to gain access, then go to  Network > Wireless .   You should only see one Wi-Fi device at present, so click  Scan to find your Wi-Fi network, then Join Network when you find it.

You'll need to enter your Wi-Fi password under  WPA Passphrase ,  before hitting  Submit.

You should now see the connection settings for your Wi-Fi connection. Go to  Advanced Settings and set your  Country Code to match your location; your Wi-Fi might not work otherwise.

Reconnect to your Pi using new IP address over SSH (accepting the RSA security key warning). You'll need to update your device first by typing:

Keep an eye on this, tapping Y  when prompted.

Installing the USB Wi-Fi Drivers

Once you've installed all the updates install any drivers you need for your USB Wi-Fi adapter. This is required to connect to Wi-Fi hotspots when you're on the go. You'll also be installing the tools you'll need for VPN connections using OpenVPN, as well as nano , an easier-to-use terminal file editor.

This is where your method may vary; I had a RT2870 chipset Wi-Fi adapter, so the following commands should work if you do, too:

If you don't have an RT2870 chipset Wi-Fi adapter, or you're unsure, plug in your Wi-Fi adapter and type the following into the SSH terminal:

Once the files have installed, you'll see a list of connected devices. Find any that refer to a wireless adapter, and search for the relevant installation instructions for your device.

Step 4: Set Up Wi-Fi Access Point

If your USB Wi-Fi adapter is connected, you can now set up both Wi-Fi connections. Return to the LuCI dashboard, under  Wireless , and remove both network connections. The device  radio0 is your in-built Wi-Fi, while  radio1  is your USB Wi-Fi adapter.

Set up your in-built Wi-Fi by clicking  Add .   Ensure the following:

  • Mode is set to Access Point
  • ESSID  is set to a network name of your choosing; default is OpenWRT
  • Network  is set to lan
  • Under  Wireless Security , Encryption is set to  WPA2-PSK
  • Key  is set to a suitable password

Once you're done, hit  Save  then return to the  Wireless menu. Follow the instructions from earlier for the initial connection to set the  radio1  device (your USB Wi-Fi adapter) to your existing network. This is also where you'll need to scan and change networks when you're in a new location.

You should now have two Wi-Fi connections running, one as an access point for your Wi-Fi devices, and one acting as the internet connection for your device to your existing Wi-Fi network. Try out the connection to your Pi at this stage with your smartphone or laptop to confirm it works.

If it works, disconnect your Pi from the Ethernet connection with your PC.

Step 5: Connect to VPN and Final Changes

You will need an OpenVPN configuration file (OVPN) to connect your Pi to your chosen VPN provider and server. If you have one, upload it to your Pi using an SCP client like WinSCP  where you can connect with your admin username and password.

Rename the file to  vpnclient.ovpn and upload it into the 

folder. Complete the instructions found on the OpenWRT website to set your Pi up for VPN connections. The only slight change will be under section 4 for the VPN client profile setup, where you won't need to use the initial 

tool to insert your vpnclient.ovpn file, as it's already in place.

As soon as you complete this, your VPN connection should activate automatically. Check your outgoing IP address has changed; if it hasn't, reboot your Pi and check your connection is active.

Find this by going to the OpenVPN  section of LuCI, listed under  Services at the top of the dashboard. If it's connected,  vpnclient will be listed as yes under the  Started column.

Step 6: Register Your Device on Public Wi-Fi

Your Pi is nearly ready at this stage, but if you've ever connected to a public Wi-Fi network, you'll know that you'll typically need to authenticate using a captive portal, either to pay or register your device. Because your Pi is now set up to automatically connect via VPN (and should prevent connection otherwise), these portals will usually get blocked.

To get around this, set your USB Wi-Fi adapter to match the MAC address with a device that you can use to connect and authenticate with a public Wi-Fi network first, such as your smartphone. Once you have this, type:

In the editing window, add the following (replacing the placeholder XX for your MAC) and hit  Ctrl + X,  followed by  Y to save.

Finally, run the following commands to set the script to run automatically when your Pi starts:

Reboot to check everything works okay. You should also check for any DNS leaks to make sure your VPN connection is working correctly. Most VPN providers offer a tool that will help with this.

Secure Wi-Fi Wherever You Go, Guaranteed

Your Raspberry Pi should now be set up and ready to go as a VPN travel router, meaning you're safe to surf in any hotel or cafe you visit. Thanks to the LuCI dashboard, you can connect to any new Wi-Fi network with ease through your web browser.

See our list of the best VPN services to find a VPN service that suits your needs . If this was too advanced for you, you might also consider other ways to set up a VPN at home .

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How I repurposed an old Raspberry Pi into a travel router

Phil Nickinson

Spring Break 2022. It was my first real opportunity to travel in exactly two years, after a little thing called a global pandemic scuttled a family trip to (of all places) China. You lose a lot of road warrior muscle memory in that time. What to pack, and how to pack it. Dealing with airports and other travelers.

The background

But first, we move the pi-hole, building a travel router, so, was any of this worth it.

But it also was a chance to reassess and take stock of how I travel. And one fix this year was going to be including a travel router.

Why? I’m growing more conservative in my old age, and that means worrying more about my (and my family’s) online security not just at home , but also on the road. And that means no more connecting to an Airbnb host’s network, at least not directly. Same goes for hotels.

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So it was time to finally figure out a travel router. Here’s how I did it.

While there’s no reason that I couldn’t have just bought some sort of travel router and called it a day, I didn’t want to spend a couple hundred dollars (or more!) on what ultimately would be going to a company’s marketing budget more than anything. This is the sort of thing that a Raspberry Pi is perfect for.

Only one problem: As of mid-April 2022, due to supply chain issues , it’s still pretty impossible to buy a new Raspberry Pi. At least not without paying a pretty stupid premium online.

For the uninitiated, a Raspberry Pi is a tiny little Linux computer that fits in the palm of your hand. It’s powered by USB-C, which almost everyone should have on hand already, and it uses a microSD card for onboard storage. And the operating system is open source, which means you can do all sort of fun things with it. And you don’t have to have a neckbeard to rock Linux. You just have to be able to search for things on the internet, and copy and paste commands — and have a little patience and the willingness to screw up once or thrice.

I already have a couple Raspberries Pi (that’s the non-official plural that I’m still trying to make happen) in use in my home. One is attached to an antenna that helps track airplanes. It’s also running an ad-blocker across my entire home network. The other was being used as a bridge between all our smart devices. So things like Nest cameras and thermostats — which don’t play nice with Apple HomeKit — can work just fine with Apple’s built-in smart home hub. But that’s the less important of my Pi. I don’t really care that much about HomeKit.

And so after a couple weeks of hunting and waiting, I gave up and decided to do what any self-respecting nerd would do. I cannibalized gear I already own and gave up the luxury of being able to see when my front door unlocks as an Apple notification and instead will have to put up with seeing it as a Nest notification. The horror.

Actually, this is the part where I have to admit that I forgot which Raspberry Pi was doing what, and actually unhooked the wrong one to turn into a travel router. I thought I was sacrificing the Pi-hole ad-blocking box , and decided it was time to move it over to the network-attached storage that also resides in my living room and is woefully underused.

Most of the time it’s doing just what its name implies — serving as storage. But it can do so much more than that, including acting as a server. After a couple minutes of searching and a few more of actually setting things up, I fired up Docker on the Synology NAS, installed Pi-hole there, and pointed my router to it.

It’s like nothing changed at all. And because I got really smart and backed up the ad-blocking lists from the other Pi-hole instance, which is now doing precisely nothing, it literally is the exact same thing, just in a different network location. The ads are still blocked across my network, it’s just that they’re blocked form a different CPU. And my family is none the wiser. (I told them what I did, and got the blank faces that denote a job well done.)

Confession: I did spend a little money on this project, just because I wanted the Raspberry Pi in a more robust case than what I had buried in my entertainment center. The sky is the limit when it comes to Raspberry Pi cases — you can even 3D print your own if you want — and I ultimately went with a $20 case that looked sturdy enough to live in a gear bag. I also shelled out another $12 for a Wi-Fi antenna , which really was the only necessity I didn’t already own.

So $12 (or $32) for the full project — that’s far better than buying some company’s router.

I’m not going to go step-by-step through the full project. But I will link you to the broad strokes.

I’m a nerd, but I’m one who still needs a good bit of handholding when it comes to Linux.

The operating system itself is OpenWRT . Open, as in free, as in beer (which isn’t really what “open” means, but whatever), and WRT, as in Wireless RouTer. It’s a free, open-source operating system that turns whatever you’ve installed in on into a customizable router. Very cool.

OpenWRT also plays nicely with any number of VPNs, via OpenVPN. So I made sure to install that, too, given that being able to securely connect to the internet while on the road was the point of this whole little project. You’ll need a VPN provider, of course. ExpressVPN and NordVPN are two of the more popular ones out there — I pay for ProtonVPN for my personal use. The process is pretty much the same either way.

I’m a nerd, but I’m one who still needs a good bit of handholding when it comes to Linux. So the free Network Chuck tutorial is what got me through this whole process. I don’t mind admitting that it took a few tries to get it right — but that’s on me. It’s an excellent tutorial on a not-uncomplicated process.

And while we’re at it, might as well throw in some ad-blocking again. (There’s nothing more jarring than leaving your house and being reminded just how awful the internet is these days.) Only instead of Pi-hole, this time I went with AdGuard . Same price (free!) and the same basic premise: The network requests of any device connected to the travel will go through AdGuard first, and it’ll squelch anything it deems bad. Like ads. Or other things.

The whole build took a couple hours, mostly because I actually went through it twice, to make sure I got things right and dialed in just how I wanted them to be. It took about $32 in new parts, but that could be less if all you need is the Wi-Fi antenna.

The important part is that when I’m on the road, I can now control the route all my devices take to the internet. I don’t have to worry about connecting my phone and my laptop and my tablet individually to a VPN — I can just connect them all to my fancy new travel router. Same for my family. I don’t have to worry about what else some landlord may have on that same network. Or what a hotel’s network might be up to. (I honestly can’t decide which is worse.)

And I’ll once again have the added bonus of blocking ads and other trackers while I’m on the road. It’s not as fast or powerful as my full mesh system at home, that’s for sure. But it’s far less expensive, and much more secure than nothing.

Not bad for a little Linux computer that you can’t even buy right now.

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However, you may not be sure which one to get. In this guide, we look at the best cable modems for the three most popular cable internet service providers — Xfinity Comcast, Spectrum, and Cox — and give a solid recommendation for each. We also provide a solid budget recommendation that is just about equally good for all so long as you aren't using your ISP's top speed plan.

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Turn your Raspberry Pi into a Travel Router

In this guide, I will show you how I turned my Raspberry Pi 4B into a palm-sized travel router using OpenWRT!

openwrt as travel router

I am on the road a lot and I want to stay connected, but I also to keep my internet traffic hidden from potentially malicious actors. I figured it was time for me to look into buying a travel router such as the GL.iNet GL-AR750S-EXT . While this is an affordable and more convenient option, I wanted to work with what equipment I already had. This made my Raspberry Pi 4B perfect for a DIY spin on a full-fledged travel router!

What you’ll need:

To get started building your Raspberry Pi travel router, you will need:

  • Raspberry Pi (I recommend a Raspberry Pi 3 and above)
  • A single USB WiFi adapter (you will need two adapters if you are using an older model with no built-in WiFi)
  • A microSD card (32GB or above is recommended)
  • SD card reader
  • Power supply for Raspberry Pi
  • puTTY (or a ssh client of your choosing)
  • Ethernet cable

Step 1: Install OpenWRT

openwrt as travel router

Navigate to the OpenWRT website and find the firmware for the Raspberry Pi you will be using. Make sure you install the Firmware OpenWrt Install URL → this comes with the GUI/LuCI pre-installed, ready to go.

Extract the downloaded file and flash it to a microSD card using balenaEtcher or Rufus.

Once the flashing process is done, eject the microSD, put it into your Raspberry Pi, plug in your ethernet cable, and boot your Raspberry Pi.

Step 2: Initial Configuration

By default, OpenWRT assigns 192.168.1.1 as the static IP address. This is also the default gateway for many routers. The default IP address did not conflict with my home network configuration and I was able to leave it as is. If this is an issue for you, you can set a static IP address before you ssh into your Raspberry Pi by navigating to Control Panel>Network and Internet>Network and Sharing Centre>Ethernet>Properties>TCP/IPv4 .

openwrt as travel router

We will be doing the initial configuration in the command-line interface rather than using LuCI, OpenWRT’s web interface. However, you can type 192.168.1.1 (or the static IP that you set) into your web browser and do all of the following configuration changes in LuCI.

openwrt as travel router

Open up puTTY and load your Raspberry Pi’s IP address into the Host Name (or IP address) field and hit open to initiate the SSH session.

Once you have established the session, sign on with the default username root .

Now, we need to change the default password by typing in:

Configuring Network and Firewall

We need to make changes to the network and firewall files on the Raspberry Pi. To do this, we need to change directories using the following command:

In this directory, you will see some of the files that we will be making edits to such as network, firewall, DHCP, system, wireless, etc.

We will be using vim, a screen-based text editor program for Unix until we can install nano. Use the following command to edit the network file:

Once you open the network file, you will notice it is locked. You need to press the “ i ” key on your keyboard to enter insert mode in vim.

We are going to make changes to the lan interface in the network file, add a wwan interface, and add DNS servers. Make sure the following changes are made to the network file:

You can save the file and exit the text editor by pressing the escape , : ( colon ) followed by wq , and enter .

In the same /etc/config directory, we are going to make edits to the firewall file with the following command:

We are making only one edit to the firewall file and it lies under the wan zone. Make sure your edits match the following code:

All of our edits are now saved and we can type reboot and wait for the Raspberry Pi to reboot with the new IP address 10.77.77.1 .

Step 3: Configuring OpenWRT Network

Next, we need to update OpenWRT. In order to do that, we need to enable the Raspberry Pi’s built-in WiFi by editing the wireless file in the /etc/config directory.

Use the following code to make changes to the wireless file:

Do not forget to press escape , :wq , and enter to save edits and escape the text editor.

Now, we need to apply our configuration to the wireless interface by using the following command:

Grab your mobile device, scan wireless networks, and you should see the SSID OpenWrt being broadcasted!

Connecting OpenWRT to WiFi

We are now going to shift to OpenWRT’s LuCI interface to make the rest of our configuration changes.

Navigate to your browser and enter the IP address of your Raspberry Pi. Log in with your credentials and you should see a menu similar to this.

openwrt as travel router

Go to Network > Wireless , you will see radio0 , the Raspberry Pi’s built-in WiFi, and the SSID will default to OpenWrt. You will not see radio1 until we set up the USB WiFi adapter.

openwrt as travel router

On radio0 , scan for all available networks and connect your Raspberry Pi to your home network to grant it access to the internet.

openwrt as travel router

Note : You will do this exact same process anytime you are at a coffee shop, hotel, or any public WiFi network you want to connect to. The Raspberry Pi acts as a client that connects to any open wireless network you have access to at the time.

openwrt as travel router

In your interface configuration, setup radio0 by ensuring the following:

  • Mode is set to Client
  • SSID matches the network you want to connect to
  • Network is set to wwan
  • Under Wireless Security, enter the passphrase to the network
  • Toggle the box that says “Replace wireless configuration”, and save your edits.

Press “Save & Apply” at the Wireless Overview screen to save your edits and your Raspberry Pi should now have access to the internet.

Setting Up USB WiFi Adapter

The additional USB WiFi adapter acts as an access point for you to connect your personal devices. I would refer to this guide that goes into detail with a list of USB WiFi adapters that work best for specific applications. I personally used the Panda PAU06 USB WiFi adapter and it worked straight out of the box with speeds close to 300Mbps. I also attempted to use the TP-Link Archer series of USB WiFi adapters, but I could not get them to work with the drivers on OpenWRT.

openwrt as travel router

We are going to navigate to System > Software and update the OpenWRT packages using the Update lists action button. A script will run that will determine the packages that need to be updated and you can install them by going into the Updates tab.

You can also do this by running the opkg update command over ssh.

Next, we will are going to install the USB WiFi adapter drivers along with nano, an easier-to-use terminal file editor. I did some research beforehand and found that the Panda PAU06 uses the Ralink RT5372 chipset which coincides with the rt2800usb modules in OpenWRT.

I recommend using puTTy to install the drivers; however, you can also search each driver in the Software page of LuCI and install each module individually. Use the following code to install the drivers for the Panda PAU06 or similar adapters that use the same chipset.

If you do not know your chipset/driver information, use the following code to download the drivers for general USB devices.

Plugin your USB WiFi adapter into your Raspberry Pi and check if the adapter was recognized by running the lsusb command.

If the lsusb command shows your USB WiFi adapter, the adapter has been successfully recognized and registered by OpenWRT. If it does not show your adapter, you may need to double-check the driver modules you installed or install additional drivers. Refer to the user manual or documentation that came with your wireless adapter.

Now that you see your USB WiFi adapter, we need to activate the adapter using the following command:

Step 4: Setting Up WiFi Access Point

Return to the LuCI dashboard, navigate to Network > Wireless and you should see your USB WiFi adapter labeled as radio1 .

Set up your adapter by pressing “Edit” and make the following changes:

  • Mode is set to Access Point
  • Set the SSID to a network name of your choosing; default is Openwrt
  • Under Wireless Security , set Encryption to WPA2-PSK.
  • Set a strong password, write it down, and store it in a secure place.
  • Save and apply your edits

You should now have two running WiFi connections, radio0 as your built-in WiFi, and radio1 as your access point. At this time, try connecting to your access point with a mobile device or computer to confirm that it is operational.

If it works, you can disconnect your ethernet cable.

You should now have a functional travel router! There are a few things I want to mention before we finish.

  • Download and install the Travelmate software on your travel router. This allows you bypass captive portals at hotels and coffeeshops that will sometimes block you from establishing a connection.
  • You can also do a VPN travel router and I recommend you check out NetworkChuck’s video for configuring a vpn client.
  • If you don’t want to configure the vpn client on OpenWRT, you can install your VPN providers profile on your personal device and toggle it after you have connected to your travel router.
  • OpenWRT has a plethora of software that you can pair with your travel router such as Wireguard, Ad-blocking software, etc.

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openwrt as travel router

Upgrading the TL-WR902AC Travel Router with OpenWrt

I had an ageing TP-Link AC750 (TL-WR902AC) pocket router that I used to carry around on my travels before the pandemic. It is a handy travel mate allowing me to share the hotel Wi-Fi with my laptop, tablet and Chromecast devices. Sadly, the router has its limitations, but OpenWrt gave the AC750 a second life.

The tiny AC750 router – running the stock TP-Link firmware – was far from perfect for a few reasons:

  • It didn’t support WPA3, either as a wireless client or an access point.
  • Does not support VPN connections as a client. This forced me to install a VPN client on every connecting device, otherwise all traffic would have ended up using the open hotel Wi-Fi.
  • Random wireless reliability problems. My devices kept dropping off from the Wi-Fi, and I had no idea why.

Because TP-Link have stopped releasing new firmware to address any of these issues, I was about to upgrade the AC750 with something more capable, like one of the travel routers from GL.iNet or the Netgear Nighthawk M1. As I was travelling with more devices, I wanted a travel router with solid VPN support.

Installing OpenWrt and Customisations

Luckily, I did some research and noticed that OpenWrt supports the AC750 . In addition, the CPU of this router is relatively powerful and comes with 64 MB RAM and 8 MB of storage, so the hardware should be up to the job.

I chose the tftp method to install OpenWrt , and once the flashing process succeeded, the following screen greeted me on the web UI:

openwrt as travel router

I won’t repeat the instructions here, but I installed and configured the WireGuard client and the DDNS client on the router.

LED and Buttons

Firstly, I wanted to do something with the additional LED lights on the router that did nothing. Compared to the stock firmware, OpenWrt allowed me to make two other lights blink when the 5 GHz Wifi or the VPN was active.

It was easy as the OpenWrt firmware compiled for the AC750 could recognise the LEDs and buttons on the router. All I had to do was navigate to System –> LED Configuration on the LuCI web interface. I changed the usb and wps LEDs behaviour as below to light them up if some traffic passes through the 5 GHz Wifi or WireGuard.

openwrt as travel router

The WPS LED on the little AC750 functions as a push button, so I made some changes to the OpenWrt configuration files to turn this button into a VPN on/off switch.

I added the following snippet to /etc/hotplug.d/button/vpn to enable or disable the VPN link when the button on the router is pressed:

Because we configured the LED on LuCI earlier, the wps button should light up when the VPN becomes active.

Advanced Wireless Features

The other thing I liked was the WPA3 support. This ageing pocket router can now support the latest WPA2/WPA3 mixed and WPA3-only modes. These new wireless protocols are something TP-Link would have never implemented in a future firmware upgrade.

openwrt as travel router

Regarding the connection reliability issues, this boils down to hardware limitations. According to the ‘travelmate’ developer , Wi-Fi connections tend to get unstable if the same wireless chip is used as an AP (for the connecting devices, e.g. laptop) and a wireless client (i.e. WAN port). This is known as the AP+STA mode.

As a workaround, devices should connect to the AP running on one wireless chip, while the WAN connection should be going through the other chip. This limitation is not something TP-Link mentioned anywhere as far as I know, and I believe this was the root cause of the reliability problems of the stock firmware.

Hardware Limitations

While OpenWrt elevates the AC750 to the next level, there are a few caveats due to the hardware limitations of the device:

Low Storage

Firstly, the low amount of storage (8 MB) is quite restrictive. Once the basic OS, WireGuard and the DDNS client is installed, there is very little storage left for anything else. Many people like to install the Samba for sharing movies and music over the network. To compare the AC750 with other devices, older GL.iNet models come with 16 MB, while newer routers have1 128 MB, so they can accommodate more apps like Samba. I usually never used the AC750 as a NAS on my travels, so I am happy to live with this compromise.

openwrt as travel router

Sadly, the low storage prevents me from installing other packages, like the ones necessary for smartphone tethering. According to OpenWrt, tethering is faster to access the internet than sharing 4G/5G link with the phone’s personal hotspot feature. Devices like the GL-MT300N-V2 Mango can tether with a phone over USB and use this as the WAN gateway. Unfortunately, the AC750 disappoints again because of the limited flash capacity.

CPU Limitations

The second limitation of the TP-Link is the CPU power . The WireGuard VPN client requires processing power for the encryption and the decryption processes therefore, the VPN bandwidth will correlate with the single-core CPU performance. According to a few random Speedtest results, WireGuard maxes out at circa 13 Mbps (download) and 21 Mbps (upload) due to the limited resources.

AC750 Speedtest Results with Wireguard enabled

An iperf3 test (using eight network streams) corresponds to the Speedtest results above. According to my results, the AC750 running OpenWrt can squeeze ~15 Mbps download and ~16 Mbps upload speeds through a WireGuard VPN.

openwrt as travel router

Interestingly, the old GL.INet Mango (GL-MT300N-V2) has a similar CPU as the TP-Link AC750, but the real-world WireGuard speed of the Mango is 30 Mbps for some reason, and I am not sure why. If I recompiled OpenWrt with a few optimisations , the transmission speed would be on par with the GL.INet Mango, but I am just guessing here.

In summary, poor VPN performance could be a significant issue in a home-network environment, but most hotel wireless and wired networks are slow anyway. So, it is another compromise again, but I can live with this.

Potential Overheating Issues

Lastly, the device seems to waste a lot of power as it tends to get hot. The bottom side of the travel router heats up to the 40 degree range when the VPN link is enabled. This can be a problem if the travel router was running from a power bank, as a lot of electricity is dissipated as heat. Because of the excessive heat, the device should not be operated in enclosed areas like a backpack.

openwrt as travel router

Is it worthwhile buying the TP-Link AC750 (TL-WR902AC) pocket router in 2022 and installing OpenWrt on it?

I reckon the answer is no. Unless you have one device already at home, there are more capable travel routers on the market with more storage space and beefier CPUs. The frustrating thing is that blogs and tech papers – often associated with affiliate marketing – keep recommending this TP-Link model as a good travel router (e.g. Google “The 6 Best Wireless Travel Routers of 2022” ).

My honest verdict of the TP-Link AC750 (TL-WR902AC) running OpenWrt is:

  • WPA3 support;
  • WireGuard VPN client support;
  • Reconfigurable push button and LED lights;
  • Very customisable, thanks to OpenWrt.
  • Lacklustre VPN performance;
  • Limited flash storage space;
  • The router tends to get hot;
  • The original TP-Link firmware isn’t under active development.

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Gabor Szathmari is a cybersecurity expert and digital privacy enthusiast. In his professional life, Gabor helps businesses, including many small and mid-size legal practices, with their cybersecurity challenges at Iron Bastion.

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MEET Beryl AX

A pocket-sized wi-fi 6 router for home and travel, pocket-sized ax3000 vpn router for network security.

Beryl AX (GL-MT3000) is an AX3000 pocket-sized travel router that uses the Wi-Fi 6 protocol. It is an upgraded version of Beryl (GL-MT1300), it runs on MT7981B 1.3GHz dual-core processor, offering more than double the total Wi-Fi speed compared to previous generations. It is designed to support families with heavy Wi-Fi usage, and it's also compactly designed for travel use.

An Exceptional Wi-Fi 6 Experience

Wi-Fi 6's is a powerful upgrade in mass device connectivity and OFDMA data transmission efficiency technologies. On top of this, Wi-Fi 6 comes with a series of internet technology breakthroughs, including Beamforming for enhanced coverage and BSS Coloring for minimal network congestion.

Video buffering ruins the media experience. Beryl AX's Wi-Fi 6 speed supports a family usage of multiple devices streaming 4K videos without being interrupted by data buffering.

Every single ping matters. Beryl AX's Wi-Fi 6 protocol processes network data more efficiently than older internet protocols, reducing the latency for game servers to respond.

Beryl AX processes VPN efficiently, granting remote workforce or employees on business trips a conveniently secured VPN tunnel for accessing company's sensitive data or the public internet under public Wi-Fi or unknown networks.

Beryl AX dramatically improves Wi-Fi congestion in condense apartment environments. It supports OFDMA technologies on processing network data from multiple devices efficiently and using BSS Coloring technology to avoid congested channels from neighboring Wi-Fi signals.

Securing Your Internet In The Background

Beryl AX (GL-MT3000) is pre-installed with OpenVPN and WireGuard® supporting 30+ VPN services. It automatically encrypts all network traffic within the connected network, including guest or client devices that are not capable of running VPN. Beryl AX can also host VPN servers and supports VPN Cascading, automatically forwarding data from its VPN server to the VPN client within the same device.

WireGuard® is a registered trademark of Jason A.Donenfeld.

70+ Devices Mass Device Connectivity

Wi-Fi 6's is a powerful upgrade in mass device connectivity and OFDMA data transmission efficiency technologies, letting Beryl AX connect with 70+ devices simultaneously. On top of this, Wi-Fi 6 comes with a series of internet technology breakthroughs, including Beamforming for enhanced coverage and BSS Coloring for minimal network congestion.

An Engineering Masterpiece

Beryl AX comes with a 2.5G Multi-gigabit WAN port and a 1G gigabit LAN port, it is capable of processing network and VPN packets efficiently using its MediaTek MT7981B 1.3GHz Dual-core processor. The router also comes with a Type-C power supply and a USB 3.0 port for external storage.

Runs on OpenWrt 21.02 (Kernel version 5.4)

Beryl AX's latest SDK4.0+ firmware presents a user-friendly interface for common users to set up the router with minimal inputs, and an extended customization experience for advanced users to install plug-ins and applications. Beryl AX runs on open source OpenWrt 21.02 (Kernel version 5.4) firmware, supporting more than 5,000 ready-made plug-ins for customization. Simply browse, install, and manage packages with our no-code interface within Beryl AX's Admin Panel.

Access Your Local Network Storage from Anywhere

Our local network storage feature supports SAMBA and WebDav protocol. By plugging an external USB hard disc into the router, you can create a private network to store and share your documents. No matter for work or family, you can benefit from easy file access. Save space on your devices by storing photos and videos on the network.

DFS Certification in US, UK, Europe & Japan

Beryl AX is approved to use DFS (Dynamic Frequency Selection), letting the router's 5GHz network use additional frequencies normally reserved by military, satellite, and weather radar applications. The selection of additional channels can lower network congestion under high density network environments.

Protected by Multiple Layers of Security

Wpa3 protocol.

The latest Wi-Fi security protocol with extensive improvements including preventive measures against password brute-force attacks, user-to-user snooping, and individualized encryption in public Wi-Fi networks.

DNS over HTTPS & DNS over TLS

Protecting domain name system traffic and preventing data eavesdropping from malicious parties, advertising platforms, and ISPs by encrypting plaintext DNS traffic using HTTPS and TLS protocols.

AdGuard Home

Using a DNS server for blocking unwanted tracking and includes a user-friendly web interface to filter selected digital advertisements.

The latest internet protocol, featuring built-in authentication for privacy protection, eliminating the need for network address translation, and featuring an improvement in a simplified and efficient routing.

Get Your 5G Network Up and Running

Use Beryl AX together with the GL-M2 Development Board which is designed to connect you to a 5G network and give you the internet you deserve. With a built-in SIM card slot, the GL-M2 Development Board serves as a 5G modem for your router to get your internet up and running, whether you are residing in a remote area with no internet access or traveling on the road. Even better, the GL-M2 Development Board features multi-WAN, supporting failover and load balancing to keep you connected at all times.

What Our Beta Testers are Saying

I tested the unit using a onn branded 20100 mah usb battery pack. given that this is a travel router, it performed very well with the battery and didn't witness any issues.

Jonathan Cope

UI and UX is great. I was already used to use your firmware and I think it is easily understandable by technology savvy people.

Antonio Picone

VPN performance is very good specially when using wireguard.

Cedric Alberto

Windscribe set on wiregard is extremely smooth. I can watch 4k YouTube video without lag.

Emmanuel grand

Overall, GL-MT3000 is quite stable and powerful, this should be a “sell like hot cakes” router on the market. 😊

George Wang

Professional Reviews from Youtubers

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Travel Routers Improve Your Life! Beryl AX Complete Setup

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WiFi 6 Travel Router with Wireguard & OpenVPN : GLI.Net BERYL AX3000

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[Unboxing] Beryl AX Wi-Fi 6 Router (Model GL-MT3000)

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GL-iNet Beryl AX WiFi6 AX3000 Travel Router Overview & Speedtest (GL-MT3000)

O MINI ROUTER que é MELHOR que o Router da OPERADORA! (VPN, Adguard, TOR) | BERYL AX (GL-MT3000)

Beryl AX GL-MT3000 Wi-Fi 6 & 2.5G Travel Router Review - INSANE $99 Router?

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Best travel router recommendations

2.5G Multi-Gig port

Vpn client / server, usb 3.0 port, openwrt pre-installed, network storage, specification, look for in-depth solution.

Wireguard OpenWRT Travel Router Tutorial

3 minute read

OpenWRT Wireguard Travel Router

Pre-requisite.

The travel router will be a Wireguard Peer, so you will need an existing Wireguard server setup. Any of the previous examples will work as the Wireguard server. This tutorial will only cover setting up the Peer, not the server, since those steps were covered in other tutorials on the site.

You will also need:

  • Raspberry Pi
  • Wireless Adapter Compatible with OpenWRT
  • Micro-SD card for OpenWRT
  • Ethernet cable

Download OpenWRT for your Raspberry Pi. Install it onto the sd card and then follow the next steps.

Power on your Raspberry Pi and connect a LAN cable to the ethernet port and connect your computer to that LAN cable.

The router should give out a DHCP address. If not, you will have to set your IP to 192.168.1. OpenWRT uses 192.168.1.1 by default

Once you are able to access the admin gui interface on the Raspberry Pi navigate to the wireless section.

Network -> Wireless

Radio0

  • Radio0 is the on-board wifi of the Rpi. Enable this device and then scan for wifi.
  • Find your home network and connect to it.

Radio0 Connection

  • After you’ve found your network select “Replace wireless configuration”
  • Set the name to wwan
  • Enter the WPA passphrase of your network and then click submit.
  • You will be brought to another config page, but just click save and do not make changes
  • This will give the Rpi network access.

Update and Install Packages

After you’ve connected the RPi to your local wifi you can update and install packages.

You will need to SSH into the Raspberry Pi and then run these commands.

To ssh run the following ssh root@<rpi-IP> . Repace <rpi-IP> with your actual IP. Usually it’s 192.168.1.1

to download the package repository list.

Then install wireguard.

Both these commands can be run in the GUI.

Install USB Drivers

After you’ve installed Wireguard you will also need to install USB Drivers.

lsusb before

Radio1 Config

radio1

  • Mode: Access Point
  • ESSID: Anything you want (default OpenWRT)
  • Network: wwan

radio1 Security

  • Encryption: WPA2-PSK/WPA3-SAE Mixed Mode
  • Key: This should be no less than 16 characters
  • Then on the main Wireless Screen click save and apply
  • Also be sure to enable the device

Wireguard Setup

Network → Interfaces

  • Select Add new interface

Create new Interface

  • Protocol: WireGuard VPN

wg0 interface

General Settings

NOTE You will need to create a peer on your Wireguard server prior to completing this step. The tutorial assumes you have already done so.

  • Generate new Key Pair
  • Ip Addresses: This will be the IP of the Peer you configure on your WG server.

wg0 Config

  • Description: Anything you want
  • Public Key: Server’s public key
  • Private key: leave blank
  • Preshared Key: PSK generated from server (do not generate here)
  • Allowed IP’s: 0.0.0.0/0,::/0 (allow all IPv4 & IPv6 Traffic)
  • Route Allowed IPs: Check
  • Endpoint Host: Public IP of your server
  • Enpoint Port: Port that wireguard is running on your server.

Once this has been completed. Click save and then click save and apply on the main Interface Page. You may have to restart the wg0 interface to establish a connection.

Next we have to move back to the terminal to setup the firewall rules.

I reccommend copying the commands 1 by 1 to ensure everything is correct.

  • Set zone 0 to lan
  • Set zone 1 to wan
  • Remove wg0 from wan network
  • Add wg0 to wan network
  • commit changes
  • restart the firewall

After committing firewall changes you may have to reboot the RPi to get successful connection.

Once the device comes back online you should see traffic on the Network→Interfaces page under the wg0 interface. Rx & Tx should have numbers.

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8 Best Travel Router for 2024

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  • Computing & Gadgets
  • Mobile Devices
  • TECH REVIEWS

8-best-travel-router-for-2023

Welcome to the world of travel routers! If you're a frequent traveler or digital nomad looking for a reliable and efficient way to stay connected on the go, you've come to the right place. In this article, we will explore the 8 best travel routers for 2023. These compact devices have revolutionized the way we stay connected while traveling, offering enhanced security, faster speeds, and the ability to share internet connections with multiple devices. Whether you're in a hotel room, a coffee shop, or even on a remote beach, these travel routers will ensure you stay connected effortlessly. So let's dive in and discover the top travel routers that will make your adventures as seamless as possible!

GL.iNet GL-SFT1200 (Opal) Secure Travel WiFi Router

GL.iNet GL-SFT1200 (Opal) Secure Travel WiFi Router

This product has a rating of A. * What does this rating mean?

Overall Score : 8/10

The GL.iNet GL-SFT1200 (Opal) Secure Travel WiFi Router is a compact and lightweight router designed for travel. It features AC1200 dual-band wireless technology, allowing for simultaneous dual-band connections with wireless speeds up to 300 Mbps (2.4GHz) and 867 Mbps (5GHz). The router also offers full gigabit ports, including 2 LAN ports and 1 WAN port, making it ideal for connecting wired devices. With support for IPv6, OpenVPN, WireGuard, and Tor service, this router ensures a secure internet experience. It can also function as a repeater for public WiFi networks, creating a private and secure connection. Overall, the GL.iNet GL-SFT1200 (Opal) is a great option for travelers who need a reliable and secure WiFi router.

Key Features

  • AC1200 dual-band wireless technology
  • Compact and lightweight design
  • Full gigabit ports for wired device connections
  • Supports IPv6, Open VPN, Wire Guard, and Tor service
  • Can function as a repeater for public Wi Fi networks

Specifications

  • Color: Opal
  • Compact and lightweight, perfect for travel
  • Fast and reliable dual-band wireless connection
  • Full gigabit ports for wired device connectivity
  • Strong security features like IPv6 support and VPN compatibility
  • Can extend public Wi Fi networks for secure surfing
  • Lack of visual feedback on device status
  • Instructions for setting up as a bridge could be clearer
  • Occasional difficulty in connecting to certain networks

The GL.iNet GL-SFT1200 (Opal) is a highly versatile and secure travel WiFi router. Its compact size and lightweight design make it convenient for travelers, while its powerful features, such as dual-band wireless technology and gigabit ports, ensure fast and reliable connectivity. The router’s support for IPv6, OpenVPN, WireGuard, and Tor service provides advanced security for internet browsing. Additionally, its ability to function as a repeater for public WiFi networks adds an extra layer of privacy. Although the device lacks visual feedback and may have some setup challenges, overall, it is a reliable and effective solution for travelers in need of a secure WiFi router.

TP-Link Nano Travel Router

TP-Link Nano Travel Router

The TP-Link AC750 Wireless Portable Nano Travel Router is the perfect companion for travelers who need a reliable and convenient Wi-Fi network on the go. It features a travel-sized design that is small and light, making it easy to pack and take with you wherever you go. With dual-band AC750 Wi-Fi, you can enjoy a strong and fast connection for HD streaming on all your devices. The router supports multiple modes, including hotspot, bridge, range extender, access point, and client modes, making it versatile for use at home, in hotel rooms, or on the road. It also has a built-in USB 2.0 port and flexible power options, such as using a micro USB port to an adapter, portable charger, or laptop. With an industry-leading 2-year warranty and unlimited 24/7 technical support, you can trust in the reliability of this travel router.

  • Travel Sized Design: Conveniently small and light
  • Dual Band AC750 Wi-Fi: Strong, fast connection for HD streaming
  • One Switch for Multiple Modes: Perfect for Wi-Fi at home or on the road
  • Flexible Power: Micro USB port for various power options
  • Industry leading 2 year warranty and unlimited 24/7 technical support
  • Color: White
  • Dimension: 2.64Lx2.91Wx0.87H
  • Size: AC750
  • Convenient and compact design for portability
  • Strong and fast Wi-Fi connection for HD streaming
  • Versatile with multiple modes for different needs
  • Flexible power options for on-the-go use
  • Reliable with a 2-year warranty and 24/7 support
  • Short USB power cable connection issue reported
  • Low power CPU with limited Ethernet and USB capabilities
  • Some issues with client mode connection to certain networks

The TP-Link AC750 Wireless Portable Nano Travel Router is a highly versatile and reliable travel companion for those in need of a portable Wi-Fi solution. Its compact design, strong dual-band AC750 Wi-Fi, and multiple modes make it suitable for various situations, whether you’re at home, in a hotel room, or on the road. The flexibility in power options adds to its convenience. While it may have some minor drawbacks like the reported USB power cable connection issue and limited CPU capabilities, its overall performance and value make it a worthwhile investment. With a competitive score of 8, this travel router earns its place as a top choice for travelers seeking reliable Wi-Fi connectivity on the go.

GL.iNet GL-AXT1800 Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Gigabit Travel Router

GL.iNet GL-AXT1800 Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Gigabit Travel Router

Overall Score : 9/10

The GL.iNet GL-AXT1800 (Slate AX) Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Gigabit Travel Router is a powerful and versatile networking device designed for travel and public network use. With Wi-Fi 6 technology, it offers high-speed dual-band connectivity and supports up to 120 simultaneous device connections. It features advanced security measures such as OpenVPN and WireGuard encryption, ensuring fast and secure browsing. The router also allows for easy file sharing with its NAS feature. Running on the latest OpenWrt 21.02 operating system, users can customize and install applications according to their preferences. The GL.iNet GL-AXT1800 is the perfect companion for travelers, offering reliable and secure connectivity on the go.

  • Dual-band Wi-Fi 6 with speeds up to 1800 Mbps
  • Supports up to 120 simultaneous device connections
  • Advanced security with Open VPN and Wire Guard encryption
  • Easy file sharing with NAS feature
  • Customizable with Open Wrt 21.02 operating system
  • Dimension: 4.92Lx3.23Wx1.42H
  • High-speed Wi-Fi 6 connectivity
  • Advanced security measures for secure browsing
  • Customizable and flexible with Open Wrt OS
  • May overheat and experience performance issues
  • Bulky power adapter

The GL.iNet GL-AXT1800 (Slate AX) Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Gigabit Travel Router is a feature-packed networking device that offers fast and secure connectivity for travelers. With its Wi-Fi 6 technology, advanced security measures, and customizable operating system, it provides a reliable and flexible solution for on-the-go internet needs. While it may experience overheating and performance issues, its overall performance and functionality make it a worthwhile investment. Whether you need to connect multiple devices, share files, or enhance your online security, this travel router has you covered.

GL.iNet GL-MT3000 Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Wireless Travel Router

GL.iNet GL-MT3000 Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Wireless Travel Router

Overall Score : 8.5/10

The GL.iNet GL-MT3000 (Beryl AX) Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Wireless Travel Gigabit Router is a versatile and powerful travel router for those on the go. With dual-band network capabilities and Wi-Fi 6 technology, it offers high-speed and reliable connections. It supports OpenVPN and WireGuard for secure VPN connections, and runs on OpenWrt 21.02 firmware with over 5,000 ready-made plugins for customization. The router also features advanced network security measures like WPA3 protocol, DNS over HTTPS & DNS over TLS, and IPv6 support. It can act as both a VPN server and client simultaneously, allowing for remote access to local resources and secure browsing. The GL-MT3000 is compact and portable, making it an ideal travel companion for frequent travelers. With its robust features and reliable performance, this travel router is a must-have for anyone in need of a secure and convenient Wi-Fi connection on the go.

  • Dual-band network with Wi-Fi 6 technology
  • Open VPN and Wire Guard pre-installed
  • Runs on Open Wrt 21.02 firmware
  • Supports WPA3 protocol and DNS encryption
  • Capable of hosting a VPN server and client simultaneously
  • Dimension: 4.53Lx3.15Wx1.18H
  • High-speed and reliable connections
  • Secure VPN connections with multiple protocols
  • Customizable firmware with a wide range of plugins
  • Advanced network security measures
  • Simultaneous VPN server and client functionality
  • Requires networking knowledge for VPN setup
  • Slow login to router's Wi-Fi network
  • Faulty Wi-Fi network scanning feature
  • Lower internet speeds in repeater mode
  • No built-in battery for portable use

The GL.iNet GL-MT3000 (Beryl AX) Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Wireless Travel Gigabit Router is a feature-packed and reliable travel router. It offers fast and secure Wi-Fi connections with support for popular VPN protocols like OpenVPN and WireGuard. The router’s OpenWrt firmware allows for easy customization and access to thousands of plugins. It also incorporates advanced network security measures for added protection. While it may require some networking knowledge for advanced setup, its versatile functionality and compact design make it a great travel companion. Whether you’re a frequent traveler or in need of a secure portable Wi-Fi solution, the GL-MT3000 is a top choice.

TP-Link N300 Portable Nano Travel Router

TP-Link N300 Portable Nano Travel Router

Overall Score : 7/10

The TP-Link N300 Wireless Portable Nano Travel Router is a pocket-sized wireless N router that is perfect for travelers. It allows you to quickly create a secure Wi-Fi hotspot to share with family and friends. The router offers a Wi-Fi speed of 300 Mbps on the 2.4 GHz band, making it suitable for lag-free video streaming and online gaming. It is compatible with Chromecast and has a micro USB port for powering via an external adapter or USB port. The router supports multiple operation modes including router, access point, client, repeater, and WISP. With its pre-encryption function and industry-leading 2-year warranty, this travel router is a reliable and convenient choice for people on the go.

  • Pocket sized Wireless N router Travels effortlessly
  • Quickly create a secure Wi-Fi hotspot to share with family and friends
  • 300 Mbps Wi-Fi speed on 2.4 GHz band for lag-free video streaming and online gaming
  • Compatible with Chromecast
  • Micro USB port for powering via an external adapter or USB port
  • Supports Router, AP, Client, Repeater, and WISP operation modes
  • Pre-encryption function sets initial SSID and password protection
  • Industry-leading 2-year warranty and unlimited 24/7 technical support
  • Extend existing Wi-Fi to improve signal strength and maximize coverage
  • Color: Basic
  • Dimension: 2.20Lx2.20Wx0.70H
  • Size: N300 Nano Travel Router
  • Portable and pocket-sized design
  • Easy to set up and use
  • Good Wi-Fi coverage for hotel rooms
  • Can be powered via USB port
  • Supports multiple operation modes
  • Comes with pre-encryption function for added security
  • Industry-leading 2-year warranty
  • Limited speed capability
  • Not suitable for home use with fast internet
  • Difficult to connect to certain public Wi-Fi networks

The TP-Link N300 Wireless Portable Nano Travel Router is a convenient and reliable companion for travelers. Its compact size and multiple operation modes make it versatile for various use cases. While it may not have the fastest speed, it offers good Wi-Fi coverage in hotel rooms and can be easily powered through a USB port. The pre-encryption function provides added security, and the industry-leading 2-year warranty ensures peace of mind. However, it is not recommended for home use with fast internet, and connecting to certain public Wi-Fi networks may be challenging. Overall, the TP-Link N300 is a functional travel router that offers great value for its price.

GL.iNet GL-A1300 (Slate Plus) Travel Router – Powerful, Secure, and Portable

GL.iNet GL-A1300 (Slate Plus) Travel Router - Powerful, Secure, and Portable

Overall Score : 8.2/10

The GL.iNet GL-A1300 (Slate Plus) is a powerful and compact wireless VPN encrypted travel router. It offers dual-band network with wireless speeds of 400Mbps(2.4G) and 867Mbps(5G) and is compatible with tethering. With the latest OpenWrt 21.02 operating system, the router allows for customization and application installations. It comes with pre-installed OpenVPN and WireGuard for easy VPN client and server setup, providing added security for your internet connections. The GL-A1300 also supports network storage, allowing you to create a private network storage with an external USB hard drive. It is small and lightweight, making it perfect for travel and use in various public places. The router offers features like VPN internet kill switch, separate private and guest Wi-Fi networks, and encrypted DNS with Cloudflare for enhanced security. Overall, the GL.iNet GL-A1300 (Slate Plus) is a versatile travel router with powerful features and easy setup.

  • Dual-band network with wireless speeds of 400Mbps(2.4G) and 867Mbps(5G)
  • Customizable and programmable with Open Wrt 21.02 operating system
  • Pre-installed Open VPN and Wire Guard for VPN client and server setup
  • Network storage support for creating a private storage network
  • Compact and lightweight design for easy travel and use in public places
  • VPN internet kill switch for all internet traffic
  • Separate private and guest Wi-Fi networks for increased security
  • Encrypted DNS with Cloudflare for privacy and security
  • Dimension: 4.65Lx3.35Wx1.18H
  • Powerful VPN functionality
  • Compact and portable design
  • Customizable and programmable
  • Supports network storage
  • Limited Wire Guard speeds
  • May experience occasional hiccups with 5G
  • Compatibility issues with some devices

The GL.iNet GL-A1300 (Slate Plus) is a highly versatile and reliable travel router. It offers excellent wireless speeds, powerful VPN functionality, and a range of security features. The ability to customize and program the router based on personal preferences is a major advantage. The compact design and portability make it convenient for travel and use in various public places. While there may be occasional hiccups with the 5G connection and some compatibility issues with certain devices, overall, the GL-A1300 delivers outstanding performance and security. Whether you’re a frequent traveler or simply looking to enhance your internet security at home, the GL.iNet GL-A1300 (Slate Plus) is a top choice for a wireless VPN encrypted travel router.

GL.iNet Mango Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket VPN Router

GL.iNet Mango Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket VPN Router

The GL.iNet GL-MT300N-V2(Mango) Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket VPN Router is a compact and versatile router that allows you to convert a public network to a private Wi-Fi for secure surfing. It is lightweight and pocket-friendly, making it ideal for travel. The router comes with OpenWrt pre-installed and has programmable features such as USB disk extendability and dual Ethernet ports. With an OpenVPN client already installed, it is compatible with over 30 VPN service providers. The GL-MT300N-V2 also has 128MB of RAM, 16MB of Flash ROM, and various ports available for hardware DIY. Overall, it is a powerful and convenient travel router for secure and reliable internet access on the go.

  • Wireless mobile mini travel router
  • Open source & programmable with Open Wrt
  • 128MB RAM and extendable storage
  • Open VPN client compatible with 30+ providers
  • Portable and pocket-friendly design
  • Dimension: 2.30Lx2.30Wx1.00H
  • Size: V2 (MTK7628NN So C)
  • Open Wrt pre-installed for advanced customization
  • Supports multiple VPN service providers
  • Ample RAM for smooth performance
  • Limited VPN bandwidth
  • Requires external power source

The GL.iNet GL-MT300N-V2(Mango) Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket VPN Router is a highly recommended device for frequent travelers seeking secure internet access. With its compact design, OpenWrt support, and compatibility with various VPN service providers, it offers great flexibility and convenience. Although it has some limitations in terms of VPN bandwidth and requiring an external power source, these drawbacks can be easily overlooked considering its portability and powerful performance. Whether you need to convert public networks to private Wi-Fi, extend existing networks, or access VPN services on the go, this mini router is a reliable companion. Overall, it’s an excellent investment for improving internet security and connectivity while traveling.

GL.iNet Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket Router

GL.iNet Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket Router

The GL.iNet GL-AR300M16 Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket Router is a versatile and compact device that allows you to convert a public or hotel network into a private Wi-Fi for secure surfing. It is powered by any laptop USB, power banks, or 5V/2A DC adapters, making it highly portable and ideal for travel. With OpenWrt pre-installed, this router is open source and programmable, allowing for USB disk extension. It also comes with VPN client and server capability, supporting OpenVPN and Wireguard VPN, and is compatible with over 30+ VPN service providers. Additionally, the GL-AR300M16 offers larger storage and extensibility with 128MB RAM and 16MB NOR Flash, as well as dual Ethernet ports and UART and GPIOs for hardware DIY. With its easy installation and packed features, this mini router is a great solution for secure and flexible internet connectivity.

  • Converts public/hotel networks to private Wi-Fi
  • Powered by USB or DC adapters
  • Open Wrt pre-installed with USB disk extension
  • Supports Open VPN and Wireguard VPN
  • 128MB RAM, 16MB NOR Flash, dual Ethernet ports
  • Easy installation and packed with features
  • Color: Black
  • Extremely portable and pocket-friendly
  • Open source and programmable
  • Compatible with various VPN service providers
  • Allows for hardware DIY with larger storage
  • Includes USB cable and user manual
  • May not provide full speed connection
  • Uses micro USB instead of USB-C
  • Limited power capacity for connected devices
  • Some users encountered setup difficulties

The GL.iNet GL-AR300M16 Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket Router is an excellent solution for those in need of a secure and flexible Wi-Fi connection. Its compact size and portability make it perfect for travel, and its open-source nature allows for customization and expansion. With the ability to convert public/hotel networks to private Wi-Fi, support for various VPN service providers, and larger storage for hardware DIY, this mini router offers great features. However, potential buyers should be aware of its limitations in terms of speed and power capacity. Overall, this router provides a convenient and reliable solution for creating a private Wi-Fi network wherever you go.

Buyer's Guide: Travel Router

Traveling can be an amazing experience, but staying connected during your trips is often essential. Whether you're a digital nomad or just want to have reliable internet access while on vacation, a travel router can be your best companion. Compact, portable, and powerful, these handy devices can help you stay connected and productive wherever you go. To help you make an informed decision, we've put together this buyer's guide for travel routers. So, fasten your seatbelt (or just sit back comfortably) and let's explore the world of travel routers!

Choosing the Right Travel Router: A Buyer's Guide

  • Portability Matters : When it comes to travel routers, compactness and lightweight are key. Look for a device that easily fits into your bag or pocket, allowing you to carry it around effortlessly.
  • Dual Band for Flexibility : Opt for a travel router that supports both 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequency bands. This will give you the flexibility to connect to different types of networks while ensuring a fast and stable internet connection.
  • Strong Battery Life : Ensure that the travel router offers a sufficient battery life to last through your trips. A long-lasting battery will keep you connected without the need for a constant power source.
  • Wired and Wireless Connectivity : Look for a travel router that offers both wired and wireless connectivity options. This versatility allows you to connect to hotel Ethernet ports or create a Wi-Fi hotspot in areas where only wired access is available.
  • Multiple Ethernet Ports : If you frequently need to connect multiple devices via Ethernet, make sure your travel router has multiple Ethernet ports. This feature can come in handy when you're working with colleagues or traveling with friends.
  • VPN Support for Security : If you prioritize privacy and security, consider a travel router that supports VPN (Virtual Private Network) functionality. This feature encrypts your internet connection and protects your sensitive data from potential threats.
  • Easy Setup and Configuration : Go for a travel router that is user-friendly and doesn't require technical expertise for setup and configuration. Look for routers that offer intuitive smartphone apps or browser-based interfaces for hassle-free management.
  • Signal Strength and Range : Check the travel router's signal strength and range to ensure it covers a sufficient area. This is particularly important if you're staying in larger hotel rooms, conference centers, or shared accommodations.
  • Additional Features : Some travel routers offer extra features like SD card slots, USB ports for device charging, or built-in media servers. Consider your specific needs and look for these additional features if they enhance your travel experience.

Frequently Asked Questions about 8 Best Travel Router for 2023

Yes, travel routers usually work with various devices, including smartphones, laptops, tablets, and gaming consoles. They create a Wi-Fi network that can be connected to by any Wi-Fi-enabled device.

Travel routers are specifically designed for portability and come in compact sizes. They often have built-in batteries for wireless operation and offer additional travel-centric features that regular routers do not provide.

While hotel Wi-Fi is convenient, it’s not always secure or reliable. Using a travel router adds an extra layer of security and allows you to have a personal Wi-Fi network, reducing the risk of potential cyber threats.

Yes, many travel routers support media streaming. However, streaming performance may vary depending on the router’s specifications and the quality of the internet connection provided by your service provider.

To connect to a public Wi-Fi network, you can configure your travel router to act as a Wi-Fi client. This means the router connects to the public network and creates a secured and private network for your devices to connect to.

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OpenWRT aims to finalize its $100 OpenWRT One open source router design and specification.

Proposals also include having an internal NVMe storage to enable Linux installation

Would OpenWrt open-source router to existing players?

Members of the OpenWRT project, one of the legendary pioneers of open source networking firmware, are finalizing the hardware features for the 'OpenWrt One ' routers. The group conducted a poll with its members and drafted hardware specs, which will be based on a MediaTek SoC (System on Chip) and Wi-Fi chip. The idea of having a router came at the same time the community announced it had been twenty years since its first open-source router firmware was released. 

Once the features and hardware are finalized, OpenWrt intends to work with Banana Pi to manufacture and distribute the routers. This would make it an easier process as OpenWrt can work on the router design and firmware while the manufacturer can seek the necessary FCC/EC/RoHS compliance and produce the hardware for distribution to retail channels. 

OpenWrt hopes that part of the revenue from these sales will be forwarded as a donation towards its Software Freedom Conservancy project and fund various other ventures. 

Proposed Hardware and Features

  • SOC: MediaTek MT7981B
  • Wi-Fi: MediaTek MT7976C (2x2 2.4 GHz + 3x3/2x2 + zero-wait DFS 5Ghz)
  • DRAM: 1 GiB DDR4
  • Flash: 128 MiB SPI NAND+ 4 MiB SPI NOR
  • Ethernet: 2x RJ45 (2.5 GbE + 1 GbE)
  • USB (host): USB 2.0 (Type-A port)
  • USB (device, console): Holtek HT42B534-2 UART to USB (USB-C port)
  • Storage: M.2 2042 for NVMe SSD (PCIe gen 2 x1)
  • Buttons: 2x (reset + user)
  • Mechanical switch: 1x for boot selection (recovery, regular)
  • LEDs: 2x (PWM driven), 2x ETH Led (GPIO driven)
  • External hardware watchdog: EM Microelectronic EM6324 (GPIO driven)
  • RTC: NXP PCF8563TS (I2C) with battery backup holder(CR1220)
  • Power: USB-PD 12-25V on USB-C port (optional 802.3at/af PoE via RT5400 module)
  • Expansion slots: mikroBUS
  • Certification: FCC/EC/RoHS compliance
  • Case: PCB size is compatible to BPi-R4 and the case design can be re-used
  • JTAG for main SOC: 10-pin 1.27 mm pitch (ARM JTAG/SWD)
  • Antenna connectors: 3x MMCX for easy usage, assembly and durability
  • Schematics: these will be publicly available (license TBD)
  • GPL compliance: 3b. "Accompany it with a written offer ... to give any third party ... a complete machine-readable copy of the corresponding source code"
  • Price: aiming for below 100$

The proposed OpenWRT One specification sees a MediaTek MT7981B SoC and an MT7976C 5GHz Wi-Fi chip, two ethernet ports (2.5G and 1G) with 1 GiB DDR4 memory, and an internal M.2 slot for a 2042 NVMe SSD. Its hardware specifications are taking shape rather nicely, but its features are reportedly not yet finalized . Some members have proposed USB-PD 12-25V and PoE and three MMCX antenna connectors. One of the project goals is to keep the price tag under $100. To keep the device secure, the OpenWrt One will use two flash chips to allow a main loader (NAND) and a (NOR) write-protected firmware recovery.

There's no official release date for such a wireless router yet. However, the process to finalize the features is still underway. Coming up with features for a wireless router within $100 is understandably no easy task. Since this is community-driven, there will be some back and forth between certain ideas and implementations before finalizing the product. Expectations are high; some members have donated to develop the OpenWrt firmware. Other members question the hardware choices, such as having an M.2 2042 NVMe storage.

The Industry's History with Open-Source Router Firmwares

OpenWrt's firmware implementation has not always been smooth sailing. In the past, companies, including Cisco, for example, have released routers whose hardware was restricted to deter its firmware from being replaced with a Linux-based alternative. Many users at the time were not happy with Cisco's decision to force its buyers to stick with its proprietary firmware, forcing them to re-consider and market the community-friendly WRT54GL router. Some were less accommodating, such as TP-Link, which blocked OpenWrt installation. Belkin-owned Linksys so far allows open-source firmware like OpenWrt and Tomato.

Once the hardware manufacturing and distribution begin, OpenWRT One will still have some challenges. OpenWrt and Banana Pi wouldn't be the first to make open-source routers. Turris is a company that makes open-source routers. A few years ago, they crowd-sourced funds for its Omnia routers. DD-WRT sells routers with pre-flashed firmware and two license packs. Asus also developed custom-made firmware exclusive for its routers while retaining some of its in-house features like AiCloud and AiProtection. Regardless, it wouldn't have happened without the foundation put there by OpenWrt. Some would argue this is overdue, but many welcome OpenWrt's decision to branch out hardware.

OpenWrt firmware was first made for WRT54G and continued to be made for a few other routers, with some clashes with the FCC and some router manufacturers along the way. 

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  • COLGeek I truly looked forward to seeing where this project goes. This could be fun! Reply
  • coolitic I'm reluctant to take interest if it's sticking with Banana Pi... Reply
  • bit_user I'd pay more for better specs. One thing that jumps out at me is: 2x RJ45 (2.5 GbE + 1 GbE) Why?? Should be 2x 2.5 Gigabit. Also, from what I can tell, the SoC has just 2x ARM Cortex-A53 @ 1.3 GHz. I hope most of these parts have upgraded versions with compatible pinouts, so they can easily make a "turbo" model, for a higher price. BTW, the article uses the term "firmware" to refer to the main operating software of the router, but various chips and embedded IP blocks also have their own firmware. I think the wifi chip is a prime example. I highly doubt that firmware is going to be open source. Hence, we're still stuck with some opaque, proprietary blobs of code running on this thing. That's not to say having open source for the main network stack isn't a good thing. Reply
  • das_stig Specs too low for a modern router, maybe as an entry level for developing markets. Would have been nice to have been fully modular components and even used RISC-V. Reply
  • View All 4 Comments

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Top 10 Best Openwrt Travel Routers to Buy in 2023

In this post, we’ve put together a collection of the Best Openwrt Travel Routers available on the market. To make your choice easier, we constantly update our collection with new and trending models. When you make any purchase from our independently chosen collection, we may earn some commission without adding additional cost to you.

Our Top Picks

GL.iNet GL-AXT1800 (Slate AX) Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Gigabit Travel Router, Extender/Repeater for Hotel&Public Network Storage, VPN Client&Server, OpenWrt, Adguard Home, USB 3.0, TF Card Slot

Last update on 2023-11-09 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Openwrt Travel Routers featured in this article are independently chosen. The ranking is based on quality, performance, features, customer reviews, and ratings. In the following section, we’ve mentioned some of the key features of each of the Openwrt Travel Routers so that you can easily find the perfect one for your needs.

10 Best Openwrt Travel Routers

  • 【AXT1800 WiFi 6 Wireless Router】Slate AX offers powerful Wi-Fi 6 network connection with a dual-band combined Wi-Fi speed of 1800 Mbps (600 Mbps for 2.4GHz and 1200 Mbps for 5GHz). Enhance Wi-Fi performance with MU-MIMO, OFDMA, BSS color and able to connect to up to 120 devices simultaneously.
  • 【Fast and Secure Browsing】IPv6 supported; OpenVPN & WireGuard pre-installed, compatible with 30+ VPN service providers, OpenVPN speed up to 120 Mbps; WireGuard speed up to 550 Mbps. Cloudflare encryption supported to protect the privacy.
  • 【Easy File Sharing】Our NAS feature supports SAMBA and WebDav protocol. By plugging an external USB hard disc into the router, you can create a private network to store and share your documents.
  • 【Runs on OpenWrt 21.02】Slate AX runs on the latest OpenWrt 21.02 operating system (Kernel version 4.4.60), with mass device connection capabilities, and significantly reduced signal interference. You can customize the router and install applications based on your preferences.
  • 【Repeater for Public, Hotel WiFi】Convert a public network(wired/wireless) to a private network(wired/wireless) for secure surfing. Work with Captive Portal. (Note: Most of the Free Public Wi-Fi hotspot set a time limit for users, which will disconnect your devices once the time is over. To deal with this situation, please reconnect your router to the wifi.)
  • 【WIRELESS MOBILE MINI TRAVEL ROUTER】 Convert a public network (wired or wireless) to a private Wi-Fi for secure surfing. Tethering. Powered by any laptop USB, power banks or 5V/2A DC adapters (sold separately). 39g (1.41 Oz) only, portable and pocket friendly. 2.4GHz ONLY
  • 【OPEN SOURCE & PROGRAMMABLE】 OpenWrt pre-installed, USB disk extendable.
  • 【LARGER STORAGE & EXTENDABILITY】 128MB RAM, 16MB Flash ROM, dual Ethernet ports, UART and GPIOs available for hardware DIY.
  • 【OPENVPN CLIENT】 OpenVPN client pre-installed, compatible with 30+ VPN service providers.
  • 【PACKAGE CONTENTS】 GL-MT300N-V2 (Mango) mini router (1-year Warranty), USB cable, Ethernet cable, User Manual. Please update to the latest firmware.
  • 【MINI TRAVEL ROUTER】 Convert a public/hotel network(wired/wireless) to a private Wi-Fi for secure surfing. Tethering, 3G/4G USB Modem Compatible. Powered by any laptop USB, power banks or 5V/2A DC adapters (sold separately). 39g (1.41 Oz) only and pocket friendly.
  • 【VPN CLIENT&Server】 OpenVPN and Wireguard VPN client&server pre-installed, compatible with 30+ VPN service providers.
  • 【LARGER STORAGE & EXTENSIBILITY】 128MB RAM, 16MB NOR Flash, dual Ethernet ports, UART and GPIOs available for hardware DIY.
  • 【PACKAGE CONTENTS】 GL-AR300M16 mini router (1-year Warranty), USB cable, User Manual.

GL.iNet GL-AR300M16-Ext Portable Mini Travel Wireless Pocket Router - WiFi Router/Access Point/Extender/WDS | OpenWrt | 2 x Ethernet Ports | OpenVPN/Wireguard VPN | USB 2.0 Port

  • 【PACKAGE CONTENTS】 GL-AR300M16-Ext mini router (1-year Warranty), USB cable, User Manual.

GL.iNet GL-MT3000 (Beryl AX) Pocket-Sized Wi-Fi 6 Wireless Travel Gigabit Router – OpenVPN, Wireguard, Connect to Public & Hotel Wi-Fi login Page (Captive Network), Repeater, Extender, Tethering, RV

  • 【DUAL BAND AX TRAVEL ROUTER】Products with US, UK, EU Plug; Dual band network with wireless speed 574Mbps (2.4G)+2402Mbps (5G); Tethering Compatible; 2.5G Multi-gigabit WAN port and a 1G gigabit LAN port; USB 3.0 port; Wi-Fi 6 offers more than double the total Wi-Fi speed.
  • 【VPN CLIENT & SERVER】OpenVPN and WireGuard are pre-installed, compatible with 30+ VPN service providers. Simply log in to your existing VPN account, and Beryl AX automatically encrypts all network traffic within the connected network. Max. VPN speed of 150 Mbps (OpenVPN); 300 Mbps (WireGuard)
  • 【OpenWrt 21.02 FIRMWARE】Runs on OpenWrt 21.02 firmware, supporting more than 5,000 ready-made plug-ins for customization. Simply browse, install, and manage packages with our no-code interface within Beryl AX's Admin Panel.
  • 【PROTECT YOUR NETWORK SECURITY】Support WPA3 protocol–Preventive measures against password brute-force attacks; DNS over HTTPS & DNS over TLS–Protecting domain name system traffic and preventing data eavesdropping from malicious parties; IPv6–Built-in authentication for privacy protection, eliminating the need for network address translation.
  • 【VPN CASCADING AT EASE】Beryl AX is capable of hosting a VPN server and VPN client at the same time within the same device, enabling users to remote access local network resources like Wi-Fi printers or local web servers, and accessing the public internet as a VPN client simultaneously.

GL.iNet GL-E750 (MUDI) 4G LTE OpenWrt VPN Router, T-Mobile ONLY, 128GB Max MicroSD, 7000mAh Battery, OpenVPN, WireGuard, Tor, Router That You can Program (EC25-AF Module), North America only

  • 【4G LTE WIRELESS SMART ROUTER】Converter, transfer 4G LTE signal to Wi-Fi, with sim card slot, 300Mbps (2.4G) + 433Mbps (5G) Combined Wi-Fi Speed networking. Work With T-Mobile Only
  • 【VPN CLIENT & SERVER】VPN (both OpenVPN and WireGuard) compatible with 30+ VPN service providers, Tor, extremely extendable in functions.
  • 【COMPACT & DURABLE】145*77.5*23.5mm compact size with 285g light weight, Max. 8 hours long working duration makes it perfect for your nice travel mate. 3.0 version firmware makes the setting easier.
  • 【LARGER STORAGE & EXTENSIBILITY】DDR2 128MB RAM, 16MB NOR Flash and 128MB NAND Flash, Max. 128GB MicroSD, USB 2.0 port.
  • 【PACKAGE CONTENTS】GL-E750 (Mudi) router with 1-year limited warranty, USB-C to USB-A cable, USB-C to USB-C cable, USB-C port replicator, Power adapter (with a US plug), Quectel EC25-AF Cat4 4G module pre-installed, Ethernet cable ,User manual. Please update to the latest firmware.

Nanopi R4S Mini Portable Travel Router OpenWRT with Dual-Gbps Ethernet Ports 4GB LPDDR4 Based in RK3399 Soc for IOT NAS Smart Home Gateway

  • [WIRELESS MOBILE MINI TRAVEL ROUTER] NanoPi R4S can support external USB wifi adapter. Simultaneous dual band with wireless speed 150Mbps(2.4G)+433Mbps(5G).Convert a public network(wired/wireless) to a private Wi-Fi for secure surfing
  • [OPEN SOURCE & PROGRAMMABLE] It can support FriendlyWrt, which is a customized system based on an OpenWrt distribution. It is open source and well suitable for developing IoT applications, NAS applications, smart home gateways etc.
  • [DUAL GBPS ETHERNET PORTS] The NanoPi R4S has two Gbps Ethernet ports: one directly extended from the SoC and the other converted from a PCIe.gets around 934Mbits/second download and upload
  • [LARGER STORAGE & EXTENSIBILITY] 4GB RAM LPDDR4, up to 128GB MicroSD slot, USB3.0 Host x2: USB Type A; USB 2.0 Host x1: 2.54mm 4pin-header;Type-C x1: Power Input Only , Dual Gigabit Ethernet ports (1 WAN and 1 LAN)
  • [With Unique MAC Address] An independent and fixed MAC address has better compatibility in complex network environments, and is more conducive to group companies to manage multiple devices, such as binding an IP address, etc.
  • [ USER MANUAL & PACKAGE CONTENTS] WiKi: youyeetoo.com/blog/naopi-r4s-ys00123-ys00124-ys00125-ys00126-92. NanoPi R4S Portable MINI Router with 1-year limited warranty.Pls feel free to email us to get the Datasheet or any questions of this module after you purchased it. How to email us? Click "WayPonDEV" and ask a question

FriendlyElec Nanopi R2S(Black) Mini Portable Travel Router OpenWRT with Dual-Gbps Ethernet Ports 1GB DDR4 Based in RK3328 Soc for IOT NAS Smart Home Gateway

  • WIRELESS MOBILE MINI TRAVEL ROUTER - Convert a public network(wired/wireless) to a private Wi-Fi for secure surfing. Create a secure Wi-Fi hotspot quickly.
  • OPEN SOURCE & PROGRAMMABLE - Support FriendlyWrt, It is based on an OpenWrt distribution and works with Docker CE .Open source and well suitable for developing IoT applications, NAS applications, smart home gateways etc.
  • Dual Gbps Ethernet Ports - The NanoPi R2S has two Gbps Ethernet ports: one directly extended from the SoC and the other converted from a USB3.0.gets around 941 mbits/second download and upload.
  • LARGER STORAGE & EXTENSIBILITY - The NanoPi R2S uses the RK3328 SoC. It has1GB DDR4 RAM, Sufficient for Running Various Applications, Smooth & Elegant.

GL.iNet GL-E750 (MUDI) 4G LTE OpenWrt VPN Router, T-Mobile ONLY,128GB Max MicroSD, 7000mAh Battery, OpenVPN, WireGuard, Tor, a Router That You can Program (EP06-A), for North America only

  • 【4G LTE WIRELESS SMART ROUTER】 Converter, transfer 4G LTE signal to Wi-Fi, with sim card slot, 300Mbps (2.4G) + 433Mbps (5G) Combined Wi-Fi Speed networking. Work With T-Mobile Only.
  • 【VPN CLIENT & SERVER】 VPN (both OpenVPN and WireGuard) compatible with 30+ VPN service providers, Tor, extremely extendable in functions.
  • 【COMPACT & DURABLE】 145*77.5*23.5mm compact size with 285g light weight, Max. 8 hours long working duration makes it perfect for your nice travel mate. 3.0 version firmware makes the setting easier.
  • 【LARGER STORAGE & EXTENSIBILITY】 DDR2 128MB RAM, 16MB NOR Flash and 128MB NAND Flash, Max. 128GB MicroSD, USB 2.0 port.
  • 【PACKAGE CONTENTS】 GL-E750 (Mudi) router with 1-year limited warranty, USB-C to USB-A cable, USB-C to USB-C cable, USB-C port replicator, Power adapter (with a US plug), Quectel EP06-A Cat6 4G module pre-installed, Ethernet cable ,User manual. Please update to the latest firmware.

Nanopi R4S Mini Portable Travel Router OpenWRT with Dual-Gbps Ethernet Ports 4GB LPDDR4 Based in RK3399 Soc for IOT NAS Smart Home Gateway(Without MAC chip)

  • [OPEN SOURCE & PROGRAMMABLE] It can support FriendlyWrt, which is a customized system based on an OpenWrt distribution. It is open source and well suitable for developing IoT applications, NAS applications, smart home gateways etc
  • [No MAC Chip] According to other hardware IDs, the software automatically generates a MAC address, which does not affect the network communication function and speed, the best choice for individual users
  • [ USER MANUAL & PACKAGE CONTENTS]Wiki: youyeetoo.com/blog/naopi-r4s-ys00123-ys00124-ys00125-ys00126-92. Any questions of this module after you purchased it, please click “WayPonDEV” and ask the question or leave the message in our forum by “forum.youyeetoo.com/”

So, these are all of the Best Openwrt Travel Routers that you can consider buying for your needs. If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to let us know by dropping a comment below.

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It's time for a new blue box —

Openwrt, now 20 years old, is crafting its own future-proof reference hardware, there are, as you might expect, a few disagreements about what's most important..

Kevin Purdy - Jan 23, 2024 8:11 pm UTC

Linksys WRT54G

OpenWrt, the open source firmware that sprang from Linksys' use of open source code in its iconic WRT54G router and subsequent release of its work , is 20 years old this year. To keep the project going, lead developers have proposed creating a "fully upstream supported hardware design," one that would prevent the need for handling "binary blobs" in modern router hardware and let DIY router enthusiasts forge their own path.

OpenWRT project members, 13 of which signed off on this hardware, are keeping the "OpenWrt One" simple, while including "some nice features we believe all OpenWrt supported platforms should have," including "almost unbrickable" low-level firmware, an on-board real-time clock with a battery backup, and USB-PD power. The price should be under $100 and the schematics and code publicly available.

But OpenWrt will not be producing or selling these boards, "for a ton of reasons." The group is looking to the Banana Pi makers to distribute a fitting device, with every device producing a donation to the Software Freedom Conservancy earmarked for OpenWrt. That money could then be used for hosting expenses, or "maybe an OpenWrt summit."

OpenWrt tries to answer some questions about its designs. There are two flash chips on the board to allow for both a main loader and a write-protected recovery. There's no USB 3.0 because all the USB and PCIe buses are shared on the board. And there's such an emphasis on a battery-backed RTC because "we believe there are many things a Wi-Fi … device should have on-board by default."

But members of the site have more questions, some of them beyond the scope of what OpenWrt is promising. Some want to see a device that resembles the blue boxes of old, with four or five Ethernet ports built in. Others are asking about a lack of PoE support, or USB 3.0 for network-attached drives. Some are actually wondering why the proposed device includes NVMe storage. And quite a few are asking why the device has 1Gbps and 2.5Gbps ports, given that this means anyone with Internet faster than 1Gbps will be throttled, since the 2.5 port will likely be used for wireless output.

There is no expected release date, though it's noted that it's the "first" community-driven reference hardware.

OpenWrt, which has existed in parallel with the DD-WRT project that sprang from the same firmware moment, powers a number of custom-made routers. It and other open source router firmware faced an uncertain future in the mid-2010s, when Federal Communications Commission rules, or at least manufacturers' interpretation of them, made them seem potentially illegal . Because open firmware often allowed for pushing wireless radios beyond their licensed radio frequency parameters, firms like TP-Link blocked them, while Linksys (at that point owned by Belkin) continued to allow them . In 2020, OpenWrt patched a code-execution exploit due to unencrypted update channels.

reader comments

Channel ars technica.

OpenWrt travel router for VPN, how to deal with captive portal

Hi team, I have built a RaspberryPi travel router running OpenWRT that passes all traffic through a VPN. This setup works brilliantly when there's no captive portal to sign in to use the network.

I'm currently staying in a hotel with an open wifi network that uses a captive portal (I assume to register my device MAC) to gain access.

Is there a way I can connect my router or is it impossible because of the portal? I'd prefer to keep all my traffic behind a VPN given this network's open.

Delay the start up of the VPN tunnel for X minutes, giving you time enough to manually logon to the captive portal ?

you do realize VPN provides zero additional security/privacy, right ?

No? How so? Isn't all my traffic encrypted and sent through the tun so can't be inspected by anyone on the network?

I don't see how delaying the start-up bypasses the requirement to sign in to the portal from the router.

that's what the padlock next your browser's address field's for, it's always there, doesn't matter if your VPN is up, or down. check out https://overengineer.dev/blog/2019/04/08/very-precarious-narrative.html

you might want to reread what i wrote.

Sorry, I'm not trying to be difficult, dismissive or rude. Not all websites are https addresses and I'm pretty sure not all phone apps are encrypted either, so there's no harm in trying to secure my connection.

What I meant by dealing with the delay - how can I log in? The router has its own IP and runs DHCP to provide devices their own IP, right?. If the router hasn't completed the portal questions, the connecting devices have no network connectivity.

start the router try to surf from a client (via the router), and get the captive portal logon start wireguard, manually, or set it to autostart after X minutes.

I tried that. But no joy. The device connected to the router doesn't get the login prompt, only an error that no internet connection is available. Oh well.

you can force the device to stay on the wifi, are you using any custom DNS servers anywhere ?

Custom DNS servers were 1.1.1.1 and 8.8.8.8 but removing them didn't help either.

removing them from where ?

router or clients ?

From the router

and your DHCP doesn't serve them to your clients, too ?

I believe it would have until I removed the two entries from OpenWRT. The clients (Phone and laptop) have no custom DNS setings.

depends on from where you removed them.

but on the laptop you can do a ipconfig /all in a cmd/pwsh window to see the DNS IPs.

The interface I use to connect to the hotel supplied wifi is called WWAN, I removed the DNS setting under that interface. No other interfaces have DNS entries.

ok, so what are the DNS settings for the laptop ?

The enforced local IP address of the router (10.xx.xx.1)

and the WAN side DNS IPs of the router ?

10 subnet IPs aren't public, no need to mask them.

Nothing is specified. The "Use DNS servers advertised by peer" box is unchecked and no entries exist below it for custom DNS server addresses.

The router is 10.58.58.1

then what does /etc/resolv.conf and /tmp/resolv.conf.d/resolv.auto.conf say ?

IMAGES

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  5. GL.i GL-AR300M16 Qulcomm QCA9531 300Mbps OPENWRT Travel Router Wireless

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COMMENTS

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