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Prison - Planning for release

Leaving prison can be an exciting time. It can also be scary. You might not know what to expect or how to deal with the challenges you may face. This section looks at how you can plan for release from prison and who might be able to help.

If you would like more advice or information you can contact our Advice and Information Service by clicking here .

Resettlement, help with mental health, prison release, planning for release, leaving prison, what is mappa, further reading, useful contacts.

Contact us:

  • You can do things to prepare for release from prison, such as thinking about housing, benefits and who can help you in the community. It is never too early to think about it.
  • You may worry about how you will get help for your mental health. The prison should refer you to community mental health services if they feel you need more support. You need to give them permission to do this.
  • How and when you are released will depend on the type of sentence you are serving.
  • There are lots of people and organisations in the prison and community who can help you.

Some information on this page is quite complicated. This following gives an explanation of some of the phrases and words that we use:

  • The National Probation Service (NPS): The NPS is a statutory criminal justice service. They supervise high risk offenders who have been released into the community. High risk offenders are people who are assessed as being a serious risk of harm to the public.
  • Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRC’s): CRC’s are private sector companies. They supervise medium and low risk offenders who have been released into the community. They are also responsible for providing resettlement services in prison and the community.
  • Offender Management Unit (OMU): The OMU is a team in prison. They are responsible for making sure that you get through your sentence plan.
  • Offender Supervisors: Offender supervisors work in the OMU. They are prison officers and probation officers who have had special training. They work with you to achieve the objectives on your sentence plan.
  • Probation Officers: Probation officers supervise you when you are released into the community. They can work for either the NPS or CRC.

Need more advice?

What is resettlement.

Resettlement is the word used by prisons and probation services when you leave prison and go back into the community. Resettlement should mean that services support you and your family to prepare for life after prison.

Local Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRC’s) are responsible for providing resettlement services. These are called ‘Through the Gate’ services. They can also be known as ‘resettlement teams’.

There might be different things to do when you leave prison, such as:

  • getting help for your mental health,
  • finding a job,
  • applying for benefits, and
  • finding somewhere to live.

If you have support, it can make getting back into the community easier. You can help to prepare for your release by thinking about your plans during your sentence.

How do I get help for my mental health?

Treatment for your mental health might need to continue when you are released. It is important that the prison healthcare team refer you to services on release if you still need treatment. They can only do this if you give them your permission.

You may already be registered with a GP in the community. The prison healthcare team could update them on the treatment you have been getting.

If you do not have a GP, the prison healthcare staff should help you to register with one. The prison healthcare team should make sure that you have enough medication until you are able to get a prescription from your GP.

See our webpage on GPs and your mental health  for more information.

NHS mental health teams

If you have a mental health condition, healthcare staff must think about whether you should be referred to an NHS mental health team. This might be:

  • a community mental health team (CMHT), or
  • a team that deals with a specific condition, like personality disorders.

NHS mental health team are made up of different mental health professionals, who work together to support you in the community.

What are NHS forensic community mental health teams? In some areas there are forensic community mental health teams. They provide specialist support to assess, treat and manage you if:

  • you have a mental illness or personality disorder,
  • you are thought to be a risk to others, due to the crime committed. 

The aim of the support is to:

  • maintain and improve your mental health,
  • improve the quality of your life, and
  • manage the risk of you being violent or re-offending.

See our webpage on Healthcare in prison for more information.

Talking therapies

You may want to talk to a therapist about how you are feeling. Some people find talking therapies useful to treat mental health or behavioural problems.

You can ask your GP to refer you to talking therapies. But it is possible to refer yourself in some areas without going through your GP. The services are called Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. These services are provided through the NHS and are free to use.

See our webpage on Talking Therapies for more information.

Your rights to services

You have the same rights to health, housing and social care services as anyone else. Local authorities have to assess someone who may have social care needs. This can include support in the community.

Anyone can contact the local authority and ask for you to be assessed. This means that you can ask for an assessment yourself. Or you can ask prison staff, a friend, relative, or another professional that you are in contact with, to ask for an assessment.

See our webpage on Social care: assessment and eligibility for more information.

How and when do I get released from prison?

How and when you are released will depend on the type of sentence you are serving. Some sentences are determinate. This means they have an end date. Others are indeterminate, which means there is no fixed end date.

Determinate Sentences

If your sentence has an end date, you will usually be released halfway through your sentence. The National Probation Service (NPS) or Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) will supervise you when you are in the community.

Extended sentences These are a type of determinate sentence. But they include an extended licence period.

The judge decides how long you should stay in prison. This is called the custodial period. The judge also fixes an extended licence period up to a maximum of eight years. Once you have served two thirds of your custodial period you will either be automatically released, or you will be allowed to apply for parole.

If parole is refused you will be released at the end of the custodial period. Once you have been released you will be in your licence period. You will be under the supervision of the National Probation Service (NPS) or Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) until the end of the extended period.

There are different types of extended sentence. And they can be complicated. So you may want to speak to your solicitor or Offender Supervisor for more details.

Indeterminate Sentences

If your sentence does not have an end date, the parole board will decide when you are released from prison. You have to spend a minimum amount of time in prison before you can be considered for release. This is called a tariff. The judge who sentenced you should’ve told you the length of your tariff.

Your Offender Supervisor will tell you what your sentence plan is and what you need to do before release. Your sentence plan could include you doing things in prison such as education and offender behaviour programmes. It is important to do the things on your sentence plan. If you don’t then this can affect your chances of getting parole.

You can apply for parole if you have a sentence of four years or more. Or if your sentence does not have an end date. The court will give you a minimum amount of time for you to spend in prison before applying for parole. This is called your tariff. The parole board decides to release you based on information such as:

  • your offence or offences,
  • your home situation,
  • your plans for release,
  • your behaviour in prison, and
  • reports from prison staff including healthcare and probation staff.

If you have things in place such as housing, work or education, and a support network such as friends and relatives, it may be more likely for you to get parole.

How can I plan for my release?

It is a good idea to think about leaving prison before your release date. It may be difficult to think about release, but there are some small things you can do to prepare.

Make the most of your time in prison

There should be things to do in prison, such as education, training, sports, and jobs. These things will give you skills and experience ready for when you leave. This can be helpful if you want to look for work, education or training on release.

Good behaviour

Try not to get into trouble in prison. Prison staff may record any incident you are involved in. Staff will look at these records if you apply for parole or Release on Temporary Licence (ROTL).

Release on Temporary Licence (ROTL)

ROTL means you can do things outside the prison, such as education, training, work and spending time with family. These activities can help resettlement.

Remember that ROTL is a privilege, it is not a right. Not all prisons will have this system. The prison will risk assess you before deciding to give you ROTL. Not all prisoners can have ROTL. For example, you cannot apply for ROTL if:

  • you are a Category A prisoner,
  • you are on remand, or
  • you are convicted and un-sentenced.

If you want to apply for ROTL, ask your prison how you can do this.

Think about housing

If you have nowhere to live on release, the Through the Gate team or your Offender Supervisor can help you. If you have children or are vulnerable, you may be placed on a priority housing list. There are four main types of accommodation:

  • general needs housing (including social or council housing),
  • hostels and supported accommodation,
  • private rented accommodation, and
  • family and friends.

You can find more information about ‘Housing Options’ by clicking here.

Education, training or work

Think about what you want to do on release. If you would like to do education, training or work, you could start looking for this in prison. The Through the Gate team or ROTL (Release on Temporary Licence) scheme could help.

The education department in prison may be able to help you write a CV. Or help you to fill out application forms for work and training. It can be harder to get a job with a criminal record. Some jobs have rules about hiring someone with previous convictions, such as when working with children or vulnerable people.

Volunteering may help if you do not feel ready for work yet. There are different things you can do to volunteer. Volunteering can give you an upto-date reference and help with your wellbeing by doing something that you enjoy.

You can find more information about:

  • Criminal Record Checks by clicking here.
  • Criminal Convictions – When and How to Tell Others by clicking here .
  • Work and Mental Illness by clicking here.

Think about benefits

You might be able to apply for different benefits when you are released from prison. These include housing benefit, child tax credits, employment and disability related benefits. It is important to go to your local Jobcentre Plus on release and tell them your current situation.

Some prisons have benefit specialists that you could speak to for advice. If there is not a benefit specialist, the Through the Gate team should be able to help. They could contact the relevant authorities for you.

You can find more information about ‘Welfare benefits and mental illness’ at: www.rethink.org/advice-and-information/living-with-mental-illness/money-benefits-and-mental-health/

Who can help me plan for release?

There are people and organisations that can help you think about your release from prison.

Through the Gate teams

There should be a Through the Gate team in every prison. These are sometimes still called resettlement teams. They can give you information and advice on things such as housing, work and benefits. The teams are part of the local Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC).

Sometimes the CRC asks a charity or voluntary organisation to provide these services for them. They could refer you to services in the community and give you helpful information.

Offender Management Unit

The Offender Management Unit (OMU) is responsible for helping you to achieve your sentence plan whilst you are in prison. You will be given an Offender Supervisor quite soon after arriving in prison. They can help you during your sentence and as you plan for release.

You may be released from prison with conditions. This could be that you are on licence, or on a ‘tag’ (known as Home Detention Curfew). Your local NPS or CRC will monitor and support you. In the community, you will be supervised by someone known as a Probation Officer.

Family and Friends

If you have a good relationship with family and friends, you might want to involve them as much as possible. They could be a good support network for you once you are back in the community. They may be able to help you with appointments or give you somewhere to live. Or speak with services for you such as probation and healthcare. They may also help support you if you are finding it difficult to return to normal life in the community.

You could ask the Through the Gate team or probation staff to contact them if you want them involved.

Local organisations and charities

Some organisations or charities provide a mentoring scheme for when you are released from prison. Sometimes someone from the service can meet you at the prison gates on your release. They will support you with appointments and refer you to services in the community. Ask the Through the Gate team if this service is available.

What happens when I leave prison?

The National Probation Service (NPS) or a local Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) will supervise you. This will depend on your level of risk. The NPS will supervise you if you are a high risk offender. The CRC will supervise you if you are a low to medium risk offender.

A Probation Officer will supervise you. Their role is to:

  • monitor you in the community,
  • tell the court if you do not meet any conditions put on you, and
  • your mental health, and
  • drugs or alcohol.

It is important to keep appointments with your Probation Officer. If you miss more than one you can be sent back to court. The court could send you back to prison.

Serving some of your sentence in the community

In some cases, you may be able to serve some of your sentence in prison and the rest in the community under supervision. This is known as being ‘on licence’. Getting this depends on the type of sentence you are serving (see the previous section). The prison and probation service will assess your risk.

On Licence Whilst you are on licence, there are rules you must follow. How long these rules apply for depends on the length of your sentence. These rules could include:

  • living at a certain address,
  • not meeting up with certain people,
  • staying away from certain areas,
  • completing offender behaviour programmes, and
  • meeting with healthcare services or drug and alcohol services.

The conditions should be related to your offence. It is important to keep to these conditions. If you do not, you may be recalled (returned) back to prison.

Post Sentence Supervision (PSS) If you were sentenced to less than 2 years and released on licence you will be subject PSS. This is an additional period of supervision after your licence period has been completed. The licence and supervision period combined will total 12 months.

Home Detention Curfew (‘On Tag’) You could be released from prison ‘on tag’ if you are serving a sentence more than 12 weeks and less than 4 years. You must sign a licence which says you have to stay at an address between certain times. This is known as a curfew. This may be known as being “on tag” because you have electronic device on your ankle.

Contractors such as Serco or G4S will fit the electronic bracelet and install monitoring equipment at your address. This will record when you enter and leave the address. If you do not meet the times of your curfew, the tag will notify the contractors. And the police may bring you back to prison. This is being recalled.

There is a helpline that you can call if you have any questions about your electronic tag. Their telephone number is in the Useful Contacts section below.

What else should I consider?

Belongings The prison should return all the things you came in with, including clothing. If your clothes don’t fit anymore, the prison may give you clothes if they can. You have to sign for your things, so check that nothing is missing before you sign.

Money You will be given any money that you have saved or earned whilst you were in prison.

The prison may give you a travel warrant when leaving prison. This will pay for your travel back home.

Most people will get a discharge grant when released from prison. This is a small amount of money which can help with immediate living expenses. Some people will not be given a discharge grant. Reasons you may not get a discharge grant are if you:

  • are under 18,
  • are serving a custodial sentence of 14 days or less,
  • are being transferred to a hospital under the Mental Health Act, or
  • you have over £16,000 in savings.

If you have found accommodation for your first night on release, you can apply for an extra grant. This is about £50. It will be paid directly to the accommodation provider. The governor will decide if you can be given this payment.

What is MAPPA (Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements) and does it apply to me?

MAPPA involves the police, the National Probation Service (NPS), prison service and other agencies, such as mental health services. It manages violent and sexual offenders in the community.

Who is managed through MAPPA?

MAPPA applies to:

  • anyone who is on the sex offenders register,
  • violent and sexual offenders who have been sentenced to 12 months or more in custody,
  • violent and sexual offenders who have been sentenced to 12 months or more in custody and then transferred to hospital under section 47/49 of the Mental Health Act,
  • violent and sexual offenders who have been detained under section 37 of the Mental Health Act, with or without a restriction order, and
  • other dangerous offenders who have been cautioned for, or committed an offence, and are considered to pose a risk of serious harm to the public.

How does MAPPA work?

The probation service will assess your risk and decide if MAPPA should manage you. If MAPPA manages you the probation service decide the level of management you need by appropriate services.

There are three levels and your level can change. If you are level 1 MAPPA, one or two agencies may manage you. If you are level 3 MAPPA, a number of senior people from several agencies could manage you. They will meet regularly and review your needs.

How does this affect me?

MAPPA can help with your needs such as mental illness, drug or alcohol problems and housing issues. MAPPA is there to protect the public and help you settle into the community.

You do not have to go to MAPPA meetings, but it is important to work with the agencies they ask you to work with.

How long will I be on MAPPA?

This depends on which category you are in. If you are a:

  • registered sex offender, you are on MAPPA until your “registration” ends,
  • violent and other sex offender, you are on MAPPA until your licence or hospital order, including any restriction order, ends, or
  • dangerous offender, you are on MAPPA until the agencies involved decide that your level of risk has reduced enough.

What if I disagree with being on MAPPA?

If you feel that you shouldn’t be on MAPPA, you can speak to your Probation Officer. They can answer any questions you have about MAPPA.

  • Prison – going in by clicking here.
  • Healthcare in prison by clicking here.
  • Complaints about prison by clicking here.
  • Complaints about probation by clicking here.
  • Criminal Convictions – How and When to Tell Others by clicking here.
  • Housing Options by clicking here.
  • Welfare Benefits and Mental Illness by clicking here.

This page mentions different people and organisations that can help you while in prison and the community.

Some prisons let you visit some websites on the internet. If your prison does not let you do this, you could ask a member of staff, relative or friend to look into these organisations for you.

Some of the phone numbers are free for you to call from a prison phone. But you might have to ask for the numbers to be included on your PIN phone list. You could ask a member of staff to make a copy of this page or download the factsheet so you can take a copy when released.

Healthcare Services NHS 111 They can help if you are feeling unwell or provide information on local health services. They are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Calls are free from landlines and mobile phones.

Telephone : 111

Resettlement services Electronic Monitoring Service (EMS) You can call if you have any problems or questions about your electronic tag. You can also call EMS from the monitoring unit free of charge.

Telephone : 0800 137 291

Drug and Alcohol Services Change, Grow, Live Delivers drug and alcohol services in prisons and communities. You cansearch for services on their website.

Website : www.changegrowlive.org

The Forward Trust Delivers drug and alcohol services in prisons and communities.

Telephone : 020 3981 5525 Address : Unit 106 - 7, Edinburgh House , 170 Kennington Lane London SE11 5DP Email : [email protected] Website : www.forwardtrust.org.uk

We Are With You Delivers drug and alcohol services in the community. You can search for services on their website.

Online chat : via website: Website : www.wearewithyou.org.uk/

Ex-offender organisations The Hardman Directory Provides a list of funding that is available to ex offenders. Also has a list of companies who employ people with convictions.

Website : www.hardmantrust.org.uk/directory

Nacro Provides a range of services across England and Wales. You can search for local services on its website.

Telephone : 0300 123 1889 Resettlement Advice Service : 0300 123 1999 Address : Walkden House, 16-17 Devonshire Square, London, EC2M 4SQ Email : [email protected] Website : www.nacro.org.uk

Prisoners’ Advice Service An independent registered charity offering free legal advice and support to adult prisoners in England and Wales. Provide advice by telephone, letter and legal outreach sessions,

Telephone : 0207 253 3323 Address : PAS, PO Box 46199, London, EC1M 4XA Email : [email protected] Website : www.prisonersadvice.org.uk

Prison Reform Trust Provide an advice and information service that can give information on prison rules, life in prison, your rights, prison conditions and how to get help in prison.

Freephone voicemail for prisoners : 0808 802 0060 Prisoners' Families Helpline : 0808 808 2003 (9am - 8pm). Address : Prison Reform Trust, FREEPOST ND 6125, London, EC1B 1PN Website : www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk

St Giles Trust Provides a range of support, such as mentoring, help with housing, finding a job and maintaining ties with family.

Telephone : 020 7708 8000 Address : 64-68 Camberwell Church Street, London, SE5 8JB Email : [email protected] Website : www.stgilestrust.org.uk

Unlock A charity and membership organisation, led by reformed offenders. It has a helpline that provides information on many topics including how being in prison affects benefits and housing, banking, insurance and employment.

Helpline : 01634 247350 (Monday – Friday, 10:00am – 4:00pm) Text : 07824 113848 Address : The Helpline, Unlock, Maidstone Community Support Centre, 39-48 Marsham Street, Maidstone, Kent, ME14 1HH Email : [email protected] Website : www.unlock.org.uk

Housing Langley Housing Trust A Christian charity that provides resettlement accommodation for exoffenders and those at risk of offending. It also delivers resettlement projects.

Telephone : 03330 035 025 Address : Langley House Trust, PO Box 6364, Coventry, CV6 9LL Email : [email protected] Website : www.langleyhousetrust.org

Shelter Can provide information and advice on housing and homelessness.

Housing Advice Helpline : 0808 800 4444 (8am-8pm Monday-Friday and 8am-5pm Saturday-Sunday) Address : 88 Old Street, London, EC1V 9HU Email : [email protected] Website : www.shelter.org.uk

Women Offenders Women in Prison Campaigns for women offenders and ex-offenders.

Website : www.womeninprison.org.uk

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Traveling Abroad With A Criminal Conviction

prison travel warrant

28 Apr Traveling Abroad With A Criminal Conviction

You’ve completed your period of supervised release, and your parole officer has just handed you a slip of paper along with your passport. It has been a hard road — from the arrest to all the pretrial activity, pleading and sentencing to the incarceration. Now here you are, several years older but still alive with a US passport in your hands. And you’d like nothing more than to celebrate your newfound freedom by taking a trip to a foreign country. This is especially important for many justice-impacted people who had to surrender their passports upon arrest and have had restrictions on their movement since that day, often even within the United States.

So, you go online, find a foreign destination you like and book plane tickets and a hotel room. The day arrives and you catch your flight to the foreign country of your choice. All seems good in the world, until you arrive at passport control in your destination. The officer takes your passport, examines it and then calls for a supervisor.

After a few anxious minutes, you hear the words everyone with a criminal conviction record dreads: “I’m sorry, we cannot admit you to our country because you have a criminal record. Please come with us so we can secure your luggage and get you on the next plane back to America. We apologize for the inconvenience. But our nation does not admit people who have a criminal conviction. You will have to pay for your return plane ticket.”

And that’s it. You have been refused entry on the basis of your conviction. Unfortunately, this story is a far too common one when it comes to traveling abroad with a criminal conviction.

The Origin Of The Problem Of Traveling Abroad With A Criminal Conviction

Before the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and the advent of criminal records availability on the Internet, the issue of crossing international borders as a justice-impacted person was largely theoretical. Unless there was an outstanding warrant for your arrest that had been filed with INTERPOL, it was highly unlikely that the folks at passport control at your foreign destination would even know that you were traveling abroad with a criminal conviction. The only time this might come up is if you decided to change your status in the country from tourist to nonresident alien or immigrant. This move would likely trigger the need for a criminal background check.

All of this changed with 9/11. Suddenly, the United States got serious about criminal background checks on foreign nationals entering the country. This was in conjunction with the increasing enforcement of the No Fly List, as well as the sharing of intelligence between the USA and a number of allies. And, as expected, many nations reciprocated by starting to look into the backgrounds of Americans entering their countries, often turning away many justice-impacted people who would have been able to enter without too much hassle just a few years earlier. As a result, there are now a number of countries that justice-impacted people will find it difficult to enter.

prison travel warrant

Nations That Can Be Off Limits To Americans With Criminal Justice Issues

Each nation has the absolute right to determine who can and cannot enter its country for any reason or no reason at all. However, most try not to limit entry since it is bad for business, both tourism and trade. As a result, most countries allow foreigners in as simple tourists with little or no hassle, as long as they aren’t a threat either to commit crimes, import drugs or stay there illegally. However, if you have a criminal conviction in your record, there are some countries that make traveling abroad difficult if not impossible.

Europe and the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom is one of the few European nations that restrict entry for justice-impacted individuals. In general, if you were convicted of a crime punishable by 23 months or more under British law or served more than 12 months in prison, you will likely be denied entry. While entry clearance officers at UK airports and other points of entry don’t have access to criminal records from foreign governments like the United States, it does seem like an unusually big risk to take, especially considering the cost of airfare to the UK and the length of flight.

Still, there are ways around this. If your sentence was less than 12 months long, then it will not be taken into consideration if five years have passed since your sentencing. Similarly, if you served four years or less, then the waiting period is ten years from the date of sentence. If you served longer than four years, then your only option is to apply for a standard visitor’s visa to the UK. While American citizens normally don’t have to apply for a visa to visit the UK as a tourist, those with convictions may have to take this step to ensure entry.

For the rest of Europe , you shouldn’t have any trouble gaining entry, especially for those nations that are members of the European Union and signatories to the Schengen Agreement, which created open borders across most of the continent. There are some small exceptions. Italy will allow entry, but requires that you obtain a dichiarazione di presenza (“declaration of presence”) upon arrival. Germany specifically excludes anyone with a conviction for crimes involving drugs or human trafficking. Also, Sweden requires that you obtain an entry visa before arrival.

Canada takes a similar approach to the UK. If you have a felony or misdemeanor conviction, then Canada can deny you entry. The Great White North is especially strict about driving while intoxicated. DWIs became an issue during the 2000 Presidential Campaign, since George W. Bush has an arrest record for DWI. However, Canada gave President Bush a special entry waiver. This allowed him to attend international conferences in Canada while serving as US President. In addition, Canada and the US share arrest information. So, the Canadians at the border entry post will get any criminal conviction records simply by checking your passport.

Still, Canada does provide some relief for justice-impacted individuals. If your crime is punishable by less than 10 years of incarceration under Canadian law, then you will be deemed rehabilitated under Canadian law with the passage of five or ten years, depending on the circumstances of your conviction. In addition, if you would like to visit Canada before then, you can apply for a Temporary Resident Permit. This will set you back several hundred dollars. But it is still less expensive than the amount you will pay on gas or airfare only to find out that you are not welcome in our northern neighbor.

Caribbean and the Americas

If you like sun and sand, then you will be happy to know that most Caribbean nations have no restrictions for justice-impacted people who have completed their sentence, including any period of community supervision, such as probation, parole or supervised release. The only exception is Jamaica, which specifically excludes anyone with a felony conviction. However, officials do not enforce this restriction if five years have passed since your date of last conviction.

The other nations of Central and South America have similar policies, allowing people in regardless of having a criminal conviction record. The only countries where this may prove a problem are Bolivia and Paraguay, which require that you obtain an entry visa before you arrive in the country. The issue may come up on the visa application. So, you should be aware ahead of time to have all of your documentation on your conviction and completion of any periods of incarceration and supervised release ready before applying.

Currently, none of the nations of Africa restrict entry for Americans with records of criminal conviction. Still, some African countries require Americans to obtain a visa before arrival. So, you should check on the embassy website for the country you plan to visit before you leave on your trip.

prison travel warrant

Some of the nations of Asia have the most restrictive entry criteria for visitors, even those planning to arrive as tourists. For example, Russia requires an entry visa and will bar entry on the basis of a felony conviction. The visa application includes a question about felony convictions. And Russia can and will punish visitors who have lied on their applications. The People’s Republic of China also follows the same procedure as Russia, barring entry to those who have a criminal conviction record.

Japan is a little more lenient than Russia or China. Like those countries, it asks if you have ever been convicted of a crime. But it will permit entry if you were sentenced to less than one year for a crime that doesn’t involve drugs. If you served longer than one year, you may need to contact the Japanese Consulate to get an entry visa waiver.

A similar situation exists with India, which does not specially exclude justice-impacted people. But India does require Americans to obtain an entry visa before arriving in the country.

Australia requires entrants to pass a character test. This denies entry to people who are determined to have a “substantial criminal record” under the test. Unfortunately, this has been defined as anyone who has ever been sentenced to at least 12 months in prison.

If this is the case, then you cannot apply for a standard Australian ETA visa. Instead, you may need to go through a more restrictive entry visa process. A great deal will depend on the amount of time that has passed since your conviction. The rule of thumb is usually at least 10 years. However, if your conviction involves drug trafficking, then you may be denied entry regardless of the amount of time that has passed since the date of your conviction.

Israel states quite clearly that its border control has the absolute authority to deny entry to anyone convicted of a crime in any country, as well as anyone who is a suspect or accused of committing a crime, and those whom border control thinks will endanger public safety. However, the Israeli border authority has limited access to public arrest and conviction records from other countries. As a practical matter, the main concern of Israel is terrorism. So, anyone on a No Fly List or who has an open warrant with INTERPOL will be denied entry.

I recently returned from a vacation in Israel, and noticed that they do have a little quirk in their system. Unlike other countries that stamp your passport upon entry, Israel issues a temporary visa card for tourists with a clear statement that the entrant may not work. It gives you three months to stay in the country. This is a little slip of paper that you must keep with your passport at all times. The reason why Israel doesn’t stamp passports goes back to the illegal boycott of the Jewish State instituted by the Arab League in 1948. Historically, holders of passports with Israeli entry stamps can run into problems entering countries that participate in the boycott. So, by giving a slip of paper instead, there is no record of the passport holder ever entering Israel.

Welcome to the World!

As you can see, having a criminal conviction record can keep you from traveling abroad to a number of countries. Entry into the UK, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, Japan and Israel is not guaranteed. Yet there are steps you can take to visit these nations as a tourist. It may just entail a little more legwork, and an additional cost or expense. Other countries like China and Russia may be more difficult; although, in the case of Russia, entry right now is restricted because of the ongoing war in Ukraine. Unfortunately, the record of a criminal conviction can continue to have an impact on your life long after you have paid your debt to society, including the ability to freely travel around the world.

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1. What type of tickets can I purchase using a rail warrant?

Rail warrants can be exchanged for the majority of rail tickets available across the National Rail network.

When a warrant is presented at a station, the ticket clerk will look at the details completed   and then issue the cheapest ticket available for the journey requested. Normal ticket prices are applicable and there are no special discounts available when purchasing tickets using warrants.

Car park tickets may be purchased using a rail warrant where operated by the train company, however please confirm with them before making your journey.  

On-board meals (if available) may also be purchased   using warrants. Again, please check   with the train company before making your journey for their confirmation.

Through rail/ship journeys, where these fares exist, can also be purchased using a warrant but not port to port only journeys.

For more information on ticket types please visit the tickets information page on the National Rail Enquiries website.

Yes you can reserve seats using a warrant if seats are reservable for the journey being made. Some tickets include a seat reservation and so in this case you can simply issue the warrant for the ticket only.

If the ticket does not include the seat reservation then you will need to issue a separate warrant completing the journey details and then in the 'Other Services' section, mark the warrant ‘seat reservation only’.

You will then need to exchange your warrant at the station. Reservations can normally be made from about 2 months in advance of the day of travel, up to about 2 hours before the train departs from its start point, or, for early morning trains, up to 1600 the previous evening.

For more information on reservations please visit the reservations page on the National Rail Enquiries website.

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Whether a conviction involves a minor offense or something more serious, such as a felony, a criminal record will follow a person throughout their life, making it difficult to get back to experiencing normal activities such as traveling. Depending on the type of criminal record and the country being traveled to, a person may even be denied entry into another nation. Therefore, it’s essential to be aware of what situations may be faced when traveling with a criminal record. 

Traveling to Other Countries 

It’s necessary to know that criminal records can cross international borders and affect entry into one’s destination country. Every country can grant or deny access regardless of a person’s records. Whether or not a person will have an issue when traveling with a criminal record will depend on the destination and the severity of the crime committed. 

The first thing to consider when traveling is the destination country itself. The ease of coming and going depends on that country’s laws. Some countries will be easy to travel to with a criminal record, while others will be nearly impossible to enter. For instance, Mexico will rarely check an American’s background before entry, while getting into Canada with one will be difficult for those convicted of a crime. 

Canada 

Whether flying or driving over the U.S.-Canada border, entry can be denied to any person with any conviction. Even minor offenses, such as DUIs, reckless driving, petty theft, and drug possession, could cause the convicted to be denied entry into the country. 

Furthermore, the United States and Canada share criminal conviction information. The person may be denied entry if law enforcement at the border finds a conviction after conducting a background check. When traveling with a criminal record to a country with strict restrictions, such as Canada, it’s recommended that an attorney is contacted to explore all possible options, including the expungement of criminal records. 

prison travel warrant

Europe and the United Kingdom

The ability to travel to Europe with a criminal record will depend on which country is visited. Generally, criminal conviction background checks are not carried out at European borders. Being honest if and when asked about criminal convictions is always advisable.

The United Kingdom (UK), however, is one of the few European nations that will restrict entry for those with criminal records. If a crime was committed and punishment amounted to incarceration for 12 months or more, the UK will likely deny entry to that person. 

prison travel warrant

Most Caribbean nations, excluding Jamaica, will not limit entry for those with criminal records. But Jamaica will not allow those with a felony conviction to enter their country. Given the differing treatment, it’s best to research a destination’s country-specific laws and regulations before traveling there. 

prison travel warrant

What Is an Expungement? 

An expungement allows people to clear certain criminal records from their history, essentially making it like the crime has never occurred. Expungements benefit those seeking job employment, applying for a loan, or looking for housing.

Expungements can also be beneficial for those with criminal records traveling abroad. Depending on the country being traveled to, an expungement may make it easier to cross an international border or go through security checkpoints. 

Benefits of Seeking an Expungement for Travel

Because an expungement makes it as though the crime never occurred, seeking one is a great first step for those looking to travel outside the country with a criminal record.  The laws surrounding traveling with a criminal record will depend on the country. An expungement doesn’t always guarantee entry into the desired country. However, taking the legal steps to expunge a criminal record will decrease the likelihood of the country seeing the records and causing inconvenience.

Obtaining a Passport with a Criminal Record 

A criminal conviction usually holds no weight over whether or not someone can get a passport in the United States. However, anyone can be denied one for: 

  • Possessing a fake passport
  • Owing over $5,000 in child support payments
  • Being on probation
  • Having a warrant out for their arrest
  • Being considered a flight risk if they are awaiting trial
  • Being currently incarcerated 

How Can an Attorney Help?

Losing your right to travel due to your past can be devastating. However, you do have options that can make travel possible again, helping to put the past behind you. If you or a loved one need assistance on how to travel with a criminal record, the team at Rosenblum Law can help. Our attorneys specializing in criminal defense and the expungement process have extensive experience assisting those with criminal records to return to living a normal life. We will take the time to listen to your unique situation and provide the best options and advice available. Email us or contact us today at 888-815-3649 for an initial consultation. 

prison travel warrant

How do I know which countries I can and can’t travel to if I have a criminal record?

  • Each country has the absolute right to deny or grant access to anyone attempting to cross its borders. For those looking to travel abroad with a criminal record, it is recommended that you research the destination country’s set of laws and the type of offenses that will prohibit entry. 

Can I get a passport with a criminal record?

  • For the most part, having a criminal record will not hold you back from applying for a passport in the United States. However, the State Department must deny an application for a passport if the criminal offense is a drug-related felony involving drug transportation over borders. 

Can an expungement help me travel abroad? 

  • Because the ability to travel abroad depends on the country of destination, an expungement doesn’t guarantee entry. However, an expungement can make the travel process more effortless. 

Should I disclose expunged records during the Global Entry application process?

  • Even if a record has been expunged, you should always disclose criminal records. Government agencies, such as the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), will most likely still be able to see your expunged records and will know about your offense whether you decide to disclose it or not. 

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About The Author

Adam is the founding attorney and principal of Rosenblum Law. With more than two decades of legal experience in numerous areas of law practice, his primary focus is law firm management and business development.

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How to Cite Rosenblum Law’s Article

Adam H. Rosenblum (Mar 29, 2021). North Carolina Must Seek Bolder Expungement Reforms to Reduce Recidivism. Rosenblum Law Firm, https://rosenblumlaw.com/north-carolina-must-seek-bolder-expungement-reforms-to-reduce-recidivism/

Adam H. Rosenblum "North Carolina Must Seek Bolder Expungement Reforms to Reduce Recidivism". Rosenblum Law Firm, Mar 29, 2021. https://rosenblumlaw.com/north-carolina-must-seek-bolder-expungement-reforms-to-reduce-recidivism/

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Wandsworth prison in south London.

Discharged UK prisoners with Covid-19 symptoms given travel warrants

Some of the released men had been in quarantine with inmates who had tested positive

  • Coronavirus – latest updates
  • See all our coronavirus coverage

Discharged prisoners who have either tested positive for Covid-19 or shown symptoms of the illness have been given travel warrants to use on public transport to return to their homes, the Guardian has learned.

The prisoners had been quarantined, some in shared cells, as part of a strategy known as “cohorting”, which came under fire after the Guardian revealed the practice last week.

A source at Wandsworth prison has told the Guardian that several prisoners who were discharged after completing their sentences last week had been held in quarantine after either testing positive or showing symptoms.

They said legally the men had to be released because they had finished serving their prison sentences. But they expressed concern that there had been no discussions about how to safely transport prisoners home after release.

The prisoners were issued with standard travel warrants for use on public transport, along with a standard £42 discharge grant.

The source said some of the men in this category had shared cells with inmates in the cohorting area of the jail.

HMP Wandsworth is also receiving prisoners from other jails who had tested positive for Covid-19. A prisoner from Isis prison in London was transferred to Wandsworth last Thursday.

Deborah Coles, the executive director of the campaign group Inquest, welcomed the government’s decision to begin releasing low-risk prisoners. However, she said: “The health and safety of prisoners and the wider community should be paramount, and this disjointed approach to release is risky to all. Prisoners must be fully supported upon release with resources allocated for safe accommodation and the necessary financial, health and welfare support.”

A Ministry of Justice spokesperson did not dispute that the men were issued with travel grants, when approached with questions about their release. “We have robust and flexible plans in place and all release arrangements are determined on a case-by-case basis using public health guidance,” the spokesperson said.

In another development, some prisoners at HMP Coldingley in Surrey were left to defecate and urinate in plastic bags after an automated computer system to give prisoners access to toilets malfunctioned.

A spokesperson for the Prison Service said: “HMP Coldingley is one of the few prisons where not all cells have in-cell toilets.” They said the computerised system for accessing toilets was due to be upgraded later in the year.

“To ease pressure on the estate we’re temporarily releasing risk-assessed prisoners and working to identify publicly owned sites to be used as temporary accommodation,” they said.

The International Committee of the Red Cross has said prisons and other places of detention remain vulnerable to the spread of the coronavirus.

“Prisons are not walled off from the world when it comes to disease transmission. Viruses can enter and leave a detention facility through family visits, detention staff, delivery personnel and detainees who enter or leave when newly sentenced or going to court,” said Vincent Ballon, the head of ICRC’s detention unit.

“Detainee health must be protected, not only because it’s the right thing to do but also for the good of wider society.”

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Can You Travel Abroad If You Have a Felony Conviction?

prison travel warrant

  • by Julia Vitale

Wanting to travel once released from prison is not unusual. And, for the most part, you should be able to do so. Like anyone else, you will need a passport for most international travel. But, in most cases, someone with a felony conviction can still get a passport after release . However, there are some specific circumstances that might stop you from traveling abroad.

Do you lose your passport when you go to prison?

It depends. One reason government officials can revoke your passport is because of the type of offense committed. If you have an international drug trafficking conviction or certain violent crimes in your past, the government may revoke your passport. The U.S. Department of State may also revoke your passport if officials believe you may flee the country. Finally, a court may prohibit you from leaving the United States, which could result in the revocation of your passport, too.

Can someone with a felony conviction obtain a passport?

In most cases, yes. This is because a passport itself is just an international form of identification. However, a justice-impacted person with a felony conviction cannot get a passport if they are convicted of certain crimes. Again, international drug trafficking is a common example.

It is also possible that someone is disqualified from getting a passport because of a lesser conviction for drug trafficking or a violent crime. But those situations depend on the specific case.

Another time you may be denied a passport is if you have an outstanding payments for child support or government loans due. In addition, you may not be able to get a passport if you have an outstanding arrest warrant.

Is the process for getting a passport for someone with a felony conviction the same as everyone else?

No. Because you have a criminal record, you will not qualify for certain programs like the Global Entry Program . You will also not qualify for the NEXUS, SENTRI and FAST programs, which are pre-cleared programs for travel from the United States to Canada and Mexico. Some countries may also require that you apply for pre-clearance before traveling.

Most ex-felons can travel abroad but there are some exceptions.

Once you have a passport, can a felony conviction still stop you from traveling abroad?

Sometimes. Traveling abroad may be more difficult depending on what you were convicted for. It also depends on where you are traveling.

Some countries do not let people with a criminal record enter their country. Canada, for example, has access to criminal records in the United States. So, before allowing certain travel, they can check your criminal history.

Other countries may not have access to these records. They can, however, ask you about them on paperwork (such as a visa application) or in person at th border. Certain countries may not allow you to leave the airport if they determine that you have a criminal record.

Once you are abroad, can other countries ask for your criminal record?

Yes. Some countries may ask U.S. citizens for proof of “lack of a criminal record” or a “certificate of good conduct.” There are many reasons that officials from other countries may ask for documentation like this. They are especially likely to ask for this information if you seek an education or employment there. In this case, you will have to reveal your criminal record.

What if a court seals or expunges your record?

If you have your record sealed or expunged, you know that information about your criminal history may be harder to find. That can be true for government officials from other countries, too.

However, you need to be careful when answering questions from foreign officials about expunged or sealed criminal records, especially with immigration authorities. These officials may have access to records even after they’re sealed or expunged.

There are several different ways that you can make sure that you have a certificate of good conduct or proof of your criminal history ready for foreign officials if you need it.

The Takeaway:

You will more than likely be able to obtain a passport and travel abroad if you have a felony conviction. The only time problems happen is when your criminal history includes international drug trafficking convictions or convictions for other serious crimes. You also need to know that other countries have their own rules about who can enter.

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Help with housing when you leave prison

The prison or probation service must refer you to a council's homeless team if you're:

homeless already or likely to be homeless in the next 8 weeks

being released in the next 8 weeks with nowhere suitable to stay

staying in probation or bail accommodation with nowhere to go next

They need your permission to do this.

You can also ask the council for homeless help yourself.

This is called making a homeless application .

If you qualify for release on bail or a tag

You need somewhere to stay before you can be released on bail or an electronic tag.

Court or prison staff may refer you to the  Bail Accommodation Support Scheme (BASS)  run by the charity NACRO if you have nowhere suitable to live.

Homeless applications before you leave prison

Ask the prison to refer you to a council homeless team 8 weeks before your release.

The council must look at your housing needs and give you a personal housing plan.

The homeless team should speak to people involved in your support and supervision. For example, probation, youth offending team or drug and alcohol services.

Homeless applications after leaving prison

You can ask any council for help but you might be referred to a different council if you have a local connection there.

You could have a local connection if, for example, you have:

close family or work in the area

lived in the area for 3 out of the last 5 years

lived in the area for 6 out of the last 12 months

Being in prison does not count as a local connection. Find out about local connection rules .

How to contact your council's homeless team

What is your location, who gets emergency housing.

Not everyone gets emergency housing when they make a homeless application.

The council must provide emergency housing if they think you may:

be homeless

have a priority need

meet the immigration conditions

You always have a priority need if you're homeless because of domestic abuse, a care leaver under 21, pregnant or have dependent children with you.

You also have a priority need if you're considered 'vulnerable' because you're at much greater risk of harm than most people if you have nowhere to live.

For example, you could be vulnerable because of a physical or mental health condition or other reasons. The council should look at:

how long you spent in prison and when you were released

if you have found and kept a home since release from prison

Find out how to show the council you have a priority need .

What the probation service can do

Probation teams may be able to refer you to hostels, supported housing or private landlords.

If you're released on licence, the conditions of your licence might mean you cannot live in certain areas or that you have to stay in 'approved premises'.

Homeless hostels

Search for a hostel.

Use the Homeless Link website to find hostels near you and how to get referred.

Select 'Accommodation' under 'Service types'.

If you have a dog

Search for a dog friendly hostel on the Dogs Trust website.

Find out more about hostels if you're homeless .

Help with money and travel

On the day of release, most prisoners will get:

a travel warrant or tickets

an £82.39 cash payment - often called a prison discharge grant

You must have spent at least 2 weeks as a sentenced prisoner to get these.

Prison governors can also make a discretionary payment of up to £50 direct to a housing provider if this will give you somewhere to stay on release.

Benefits to help with rent and other costs

You may need to apply for universal credit when you're released from prison to help with living costs. Universal credit includes a housing element to help with rent .

If you move in with a partner who gets benefits, you will need to claim benefits as a couple.

You will probably have to claim housing benefit to help with rent if you stay in a hostel, supported or temporary housing on release. You can still get universal credit to help with other living costs.

Read our advice on how to find a private landlord if you get benefits .

Turn2Us have more information about benefits for prisoners and their families.

If you do not have a bank account

You may need to open a bank account so you have somewhere to get your wages and benefits paid into.

Read our guide on how to open a bank account if you're homeless .

Unlock have useful online information about ID for prisoners and people on release. Unlock are a charity for people with criminal records.

Charities that could help

Nacro (National Association for the Care and Resettlement of Offenders) 

0300 123 1999

Monday to Thursday 9am-5pm; Friday 1-5pm

Search for a Nacro service on their website.

Nacro provide advice, housing and other services.

St Giles provide community based services and support for prison leavers.

Get help from St Giles using their online form.

Women in Prison help women in prison and the community.

020 7359 6674 (women only)

Pact help prisoners and their families, in prisons and the community.

0808 808 2003 (family members only)

Monday to Friday 9am-8pm; Saturday to Sunday 10am-3pm

Last updated: 21 December 2022

If you need to talk to someone, we'll do our best to help

Have you had a bad housing experience.

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Return of Surrendered Passports

Law enforcement agencies may ask for passport records and restrictions on the use of U.S. passports.

Requesting Passport Records

Law enforcement agencies may request certified copies of U.S. passport records. You must include the following information in your request:

  • Subject’s name
  • Date of birth
  • Place of birth
  • Explain if you are prosecuting or investigating the subject
  • Include the names of the defendants, or those under investigation
  • Identify the crimes and include statutory citations, and
  • Explain how the records you want relate to the investigation or prosecution of the subject

Send your request on official agency letterhead to:

U.S. Department of State Office of Records Management Records Review and Release Division 44132 Mercure Cir PO Box 1227 Sterling, VA 20166

Phone: 202-485-6550 Fax: 202-485-6555

Returning Lost and Stolen Passports

When a customer  reports a passport lost or stolen , we cancel it so no one can use it to travel to a foreign country. If a lost or stolen U.S. passport is returned to your office, send the passport and a letter (on your agency's letterhead) to this address:

U.S. Department of State Consular Lost and Stolen Passport Unit (CLASP) 44132 Mercure Cir PO Box 1150 Sterling, VA 20166

Passport Restrictive Actions

Placing subject in namecheck system.

We use a system to check the name and verify the identity of every passport applicant. Law enforcement agencies may ask us to enter a subject's name in this system. We will let you know before a passport is issued, even if there is no warrant or court order.

In your agency's request to add a subject's name to this system, you must include:

  • The name, date of birth, and place of birth of the subject
  • A list of the crimes you are investigating with the statutory citations
  • Reasons for the request, and
  • The names, agency addresses, and phone numbers of the law enforcement officer and supervisor whom we can contact

Send your request on official agency letterhead by mail or fax to:

U.S. Department of State CA/PPT/S/A 44132 Mercure Cir PO Box 1243 Sterling, VA 20166-1243

Fax: 202-485-6496

Denying a Passport

Law enforcement agencies may ask us to deny a passport under 22 CFR 51.60. Some reasons to deny a passport include:

  • A valid, unsealed federal warrant of arrest
  • A federal or state criminal court order
  • A condition of parole or probation forbidding departure from the United States (or the jurisdiction of the court)
  • A request for extradition

In your agency's request to deny a passport, you must include:

  • A copy of the valid arrest warrant or criminal court order, and

Revoking a Passport

Law enforcement agencies may ask us to revoke a subject's passport under 22 CFR 51.60-65. After we revoke a U.S. passport, we inform law enforcement and border agencies around the world so the subject cannot travel. 

In your agency's request to revoke a passport, you must include:

  • The subject’s name (include aliases)
  • Date and place of birth
  • Social security number
  • Known previous passport numbers
  • Last known physical address
  • Any other identity documents and photographs of the subject
  • Copies of any criminal court orders or valid arrest warrants, and
  • The names, agency addresses, and phone numbesr of the law enforcement officer and supervisor whom we can contact

When to Keep and Return a Passport

Your agency may keep a U.S. passport as evidence and to prevent a subject from fleeing the country.

If the subject is sentenced to prison or probation under conditions which prevent leaving the United States, send the subject’s U.S. passport to us. Provide information about the date and terms of the sentencing order. 

When the passport is no longer needed for law enforcement purposes and the subject is still in custody or under bond or parole, you must return the passport to this address:

Let us know immediately if:

  • A subject is arrested
  • When a warrant is overturned or set aside
  • When you no longer need us to restrict use of the subject's U.S. passport

For more information on how to return passports, call us at 202-485-6400 or contact us by fax at 202-485-6496.

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Rail Travel mid 20th Century

Pre-digital travel warrants and passes for service personnel, UK

travel warrants and passes

Travel warrants and passes for absence for men and women in the forces didn't significantly change until the digital era. In fact, it was more or less the same for most of the 20th century, including in the First and Second World Wars . This page describes the system in detail with illustrations and explains why it was necessary. The page concludes with historical notes.

What travel warrants were

A travel warrant, also known as a rail warrant or travel voucher, was a voucher that was issued to an individual or group of service personnel for travel on the railways.

Why travel warrants were issued

Travel warrants could be issued for several reasons, e.g. for travel to a training course or for leave. It was rare, in my experience, for a senior officer to allow travel warrants for other circumstances unless there was a family death.

Travel warrants for leave were always to a pre-designated location which was usually the area of the family home. The distance was immaterial.

How travel warrants were issued

Travel warrants were administered from what was known as a Registry. There was one in every unit of the RAF - a unit being one's place of work. When I first joined the RAF my first unit was the Royal Air Force College Cranwell; my last was a fighter squadron at Conningsby. A registry was staffed by a sergeant, a corporal and one or more Senior Aircrafts Men.

Usually the corporal was in charge of issuing a warrant. He did so in response to receiving an order, also known as a signal, usually from a type of teleprinter. He gave the travel warrant to the person about to travel and submitted carbon copies at intervals to Station Head Quarters for accounting purposes. New recruits had their travel warrants posted to them.

From travel warrant to train ticket

It was a good idea to get to the railway station early with one's travel warrant as the ticket office had to translate it into tickets. Many years ago, as a sergeant in the cadets, I had to present a warrant for myself and about 20 other cadets to travel from Birmingham to a remote station in Oxford. The ticket clerk was unfamiliar with the warrant system and we nearly missed the train!

1954 train ticket for a member of Her Majesty's Forces on leave

A travel warrant ticket for a member of Her Majesty's Forces travelling on leave. It is date-stamped on the back as 4th January 1954 and is courtesy of Tony Harris.

Note from the webmaster

Because the ticket in the photo is marked THIRD CLASS it shows that ordinary forces personnel were not expected to travel in much comfort. As explained on the page about classes of train travel, third class travel was very basic and was already being phased out while I was growing up in the 1940s. As far as I know, my working class family never even had the option of travelling third class after WW2. Yet this ticket is dated as late as 1954. It is for Southern Railways, so possibly different lines had different policies.

I remember passenger train tickets being pale green. So has this one faded over time or were forces' tickets a different colour, as were platform tickets ? If you can clarify or add anything, please contact me.

Warrants and reimbursement for non-rail travel

In my experience there never were bus warrants. If you had to take a bus after the train, you kept the ticket and submitted it with a travel claim (Form 1771). You could also detail timings so you could be reimbursed for missed meals and what were called "incidentals". Eventually you might see the money again!

I do recall a travel order for a ferry. On one occasion I was issued one for a ferry that had ceased to run about 10 years earlier! The system was also notorious for trying to issue rail warrants long after that particular line was closed!

Passes for absence issued with travel warrants

For much of the 20th century, service personnel were expected to travel in uniform. This meant that they could be instantly recognised, so might be accused of being Absent Without Leave (AWOL) - something not uncommon in wartime when so many men had been forced to join up. To meet such an eventuality, the services issued passes along with their travel warrants. These were for inspection by any authority to show that the individual concerned was absent from his or her place of work with the agreement of the commanding officer. (Nowadays service personnel are not required to travel in uniform as it singles them out for terrorist attacks.)

1940s army pass for being absent from quarters for the purpose of travelling to Rome.

1940s army pass for being absent from quarters for the purpose of travelling to Rome. Provided by Alan Bennett from his father's papers.

1944 army pass for being absent from quarters/duty for the purpose of travelling to Cairo

1944 army pass for being absent from quarters/duty for the purpose of travelling to Cairo. Provided by Alan Bennett from his father's papers.

A pass can be for annual leave, for 24 or 48 hours for a day or a weekend off, or just for part of a day away from the base. Nowadays a pass is usually referred to as a leave pass and is permission to be away from ones place of duty.

Passes were even required for leaving the camp/barracks just for an evening. In the armed forces, every second of every day belonged - and still belongs - to someone else. So if you were off-base for an evening, you had better have had permission!

Both warrants and passes are a feature of military life, regardless of whether a war is on.

H istorical note on military travel warrants and passes

During my time in the RAF I had access to archival material from the 1950s which confirmed that the travel warrant system was more or less as described above. Several of the post- World War Two national servicemen mention travel warrants on this website. My father's leave passes mention travel by warrant and are dated earlier still, namely 1941. I also understand that T E Lawrence (of Lawrence of Arabia fame) mentions being given a travel warrant when he was posted to RAF Cranwell which must have been in the mid-1920s. So the warrant system must have been around from at the least the Great War if not before.

One of my older friends was a pay clerk in the RAF in the early 1950s and he confirmed that its administrative systems were pretty much the same down the ages, the only real change came with the digital era. In particular pay then started being paid into bank accounts rather than in a pay parade .

If you can add anything to this page or provide a photo, I would be pleased if you would contact me.

sources: early 20th century material       sources: ww2 home front and other material      contact the webmaster/author/researcher/editor      privacy policy

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Can Felon’s Travel Outside the US: What Countries Can You Travel to with a Felony?

Yes, felons can travel outside the country because the law allows them to get a passport, the question is, what country are you traveling to – or intending to travel to? Below is what you need to know.

Quick take: Can felons travel outside the US?

  • Felons can travel outside the country after completing their sentence or post prison sentence such as probation or electronic monitoring.
  • The fifth amendment protects your right to travel.
  • A felony conviction may disqualify you from getting a visa.
  • If you have completed your sentence, you may apply for a passport.
  • No visa countries only require a passport.
  • There are less restrictions when you travel by sea.
  • The country you are travelling to may deny you entry, so check the immigration and travel laws before purchasing ticket.

crop pensive ethnic man behind bars in daytime

Can you travel with a felony record?

In the US, once a felon completes his sentence and there is no court order barring the convict from travel, that individual is free to travel outside the country. However, if you have a pending case or if you:

  • Owe at least $25000 in back child support.
  • On a supervised release program for committing a federal crime, felony, or possession of a controlled substance.
  • The court forbade you from leaving the country.
  • You have impending court hearings for a felony or federal crime.
  • Convicted of drug trafficking.

The department of state may deny you a passport or exit from the country. That raises the question.

Are felons allowed to fly?

If you have completed your sentence, the law does not restrict you from traveling by plane or other means. Remember, your right to travel is protected under the fifth amendment. However, if you are a flight risk, or if there is a court order or warrant barring you from travel. Airport officials may confiscate your passport. If you are in a foreign country, you may be deported.

Can a felon travel outside the US without a passport?

Some countries do not ask US citizens to produce a visa, all they need is a passport. Why is this important? According to the US embassy. An individual who has been arrested, cautioned, or convicted of a criminal offense (anywhere in the world), must declare the conviction when applying for a visa.

If the crime happened within the shores of the United States, the embassy requires you to obtain a court record from the court in which you were tried. Note that the embassy can only issue a visa if the arrest did not result in a conviction. What the embassy wants from your record is. (1) to verify the nature of the offense (2) pending cases (3) penalty imposed.

Because of that, if trial resulted in a conviction, it is highly unlikely that you will get a visa to travel outside the US. Other embassies have similar requirements, so as a felon, getting a visa can be problematic.

Can you get a passport with a felony conviction in the US?

Yes. A felony conviction does not revoke your right to travel. Furthermore, a passport is an identifying document, meaning anyone can apply for one. To begin the process, you must complete a DS-11 Application for a passport .

To complete the form, you will need:

  • Proof of citizenship
  • Proof of identity
  • A recent color photograph.
  • You must pay an application fee.

Note that under 18. USC. 1001 and 18.USC 1542/ 18 USC.1621. Intentionally and willfully making false statements while applying for a visa, and alteration/mutilation of US passports -are crimes punishable by fines and or prison. Therefore, when applying for a passport, it is in your best interest to answer all questions truthfully.

prison travel warrant

What felonies disqualify you from getting a passport?

The only crime that may disqualify you from getting a passport is a conviction for international drug trafficking.

Some countries allow US citizens to enter without a visa. Thus, if you are a felon and have a passport, you can enter the following countries.

Countries that do not require US citizens to produce a visa in 2021

According to worldpopulationreview , in 2021, US passport Visa-free Countries include:

  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • The British Virgin Islands
  • Brunei Bulgaria
  • Cayman island
  • Czech Republic

See the full list in the link above.

Can US felons travel to Canada?

If you have completed your sentence, there are two ways to travel to Canada with a felony conviction. One is to apply for a Canada Temporary Resident Permit. Two, complete a Criminal Rehabilitation Form. A Temporary Resident Permit (TRP) allows the holder to visit Canada for a set amount of time. Meaning, you cannot use it to become a permanent resident.

To become a permanent resident or extend your stay in Canada you will need a Criminal Rehabilitation Form .

What to remember:

  • You can only apply for criminal rehabilitation five years after finishing your sentence in the US.
  • If you apply before the five-year waiting period, you will have to check “for information only.” It is then up to an officer to decide if you gain entry.
  • You may find both applications at a Canadian embassy or download the forms via the links above.
  • Temporary Residents Permit authorizes the holder and his/her family to enter Canada.
  • Not complying with the terms of a TRP is a violation of Canada’s immigration and refugee protection act
  • You may have to undergo a medical examination when applying for temporary or permanent residency.
  • The passport expiry date may affect the length of time you can stay in the country.
  • If you have a passport, Canada may deny you entry if you do not have approval for rehabilitation.

It is also worth noting that Americans traveling to Canada who intend to stay less than 180 days do not need visas according to the US Department of State-Bureau of Consular AFF .

Can felons travel to Europe or the UK?

Some countries in Europe have strict no-admission policies for individuals convicted of certain felonies or ones with criminal records. Furthermore, country immigration laws change almost daily. Because of that, before you make travel arrangements, it is vital to contact the embassy of the country you intend to visit.

The Schengen region of Europe , an area encompassing about 26 countries, including France, Germany, Greece, Denmark, and Estonia -have lenient immigration laws, meaning a record will not deny you entry. But again, check with the embassy before you board a plane or purchase tickets.

Remember, you may get into the country, but it is up to border patrol officials to decide if you can stay.

How do you enter the Schengen region?

If you are American, you do not need a visa to enter, all you need is your passport.

Can felons travel to Africa, Asia, and the middle east?

There are over fifty countries in Africa each with its own immigration laws, some laws are strict, and some are loose. For example, countries including South Africa, Senegal, Malawi, and Rwanda, do not require Americans to have a visa, whereas, you may need a visa to travel to Kenya and the other countries.

The majority of countries in Africa do not restrict felons from traveling there, instead, what they want to know is your reason for travel, how long you will be in the country, and where you want to go. what might restrict you from entry into African and Asian countries is if you are on TSA’s no-fly list or terror watch.

African countries that do not allow felons include: Nigeria, Ethiopia, Egypt, Congo, South Africa, Uganda, Sudan, Kenya, Angola, Ghana, Niger, Zambia, Morocco, and Malawi.

Asian countries that do not allow felons in 2021 include China, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, the Philippines, Japan, Vietnam, Iran, Myanmar.

See the full list here.

Can felons travel via cruise ship?

Some cruise ships do not require passengers to carry a passport or Visa. Consequently, choosing to travel on a cruise ship or commercial ship is a great alternative to air travel because you may or may not need a visa to leave the ship when it docks.

Get your record expunged

In the US, certain felonies are eligible for expungement after the accused has completed the sentence. For example, if you were convicted of a felony when you were below 18 and have completed the sentence, you may petition the court to expunge your record. Expunging your record will shield you from country-imposed travel restrictions.

What happens if the court grants your expungement is the court deletes your record of conviction or arrest. Because of that, you will no longer be required to report your conviction while applying for a VISA, or work. In some states, juvenile records are sealed automatically, and in others, you must petition the court. Therefore, we recommend consulting with a criminal lawyer near you to find out if you are eligible.

Conclusion: Can felons travel outside the country?

As an American citizen, your right to travel is enshrined in the constitution. Because of that, if you do not have an impending case or if there are no warrants for your arrest, you may get a passport and travel.

However, it is up to the country you are traveling to decide if you can get in. so we recommend contacting the country’s embassy or checking the countries immigration laws.

No visa countries only require you to have a passport, making them easier for felons to enter. However, entering another country illegally is a crime that may land you in a foreign prison. So, we recommend using formal means. It is also worth noting that there are fewer checks when you travel by sea.

Yes, felons can travel outside the country because the law allows them to get a passport, the question is, what country are you traveling or intending to travel to? Below is what you need to know.

Quick take: can felons travel outside the US?

Cann you travel with a felony record?

Can a felon travel outside the us without a passport.

The only crime that may disqualify you from getting a passport is a conviction for international Drug trafficking.

The first step to getting your record expunged is completing probation, for help with that try the app Finish Probation to keep track of all your appointments.

Related : Can felons travel Australia Can felons travel Canada

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France prisoner escape: Day of blockades in French prisons as inmate called 'The Fly' on the run

Several hundred police officers have been deployed nationwide to find the convict known as "The Fly" and the gunmen who helped him escape.

Wednesday 15 May 2024 16:03, UK

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Mohamed Amra

Two prison officers who were killed in an attack on a police convoy in France have been named - as Interpol issued a red notice search warrant for escaped prisoner Mohamed Amra, nicknamed "The Fly".

Dad-of-two Fabrice Moello, 52, and soon-to-be-father Arnaud Garcia, 34, were killed and three others seriously wounded when the convoy transporting Amra from court to jail was ambushed at a motorway tollbooth near Rouen in Normandy by gunmen wearing balaclavas.

Fabrice Moello and Arnaud Garcia

Amra - a suspected drug boss - is at the centre of the police manhunt for the perpetrators of the attack after escaping from the prison van during the assault.

Several hundred police officers have been deployed nationwide to find the 30-year-old convict and gunmen. It is unclear how many assailants were involved.

CCTV footage showed a black Peugeot SUV driving into the front of the white prison van, with other video showing at least two armed men carrying rifles circling the car in flames on the A154 motorway.

French media reports suggested a second car used during the attack was a Sedan - stolen in the town of Pontault-Combault in northern France - which had been following the convoy and together with the SUV trapped the prison van.

The two cars were later found torched a few miles away.

Mohamed Amra

Mr Moello, a married father of twins, held the rank of captain and had joined the prison service in 1996, according to French media reports.

Mr Garcia was also married and had been a brigadier supervisor since November 2009.

His father told French radio network RTL his son loved his job as he called for a firm response from the government.

"My son was murdered! This ambush was worked on, prepared, premeditated," said Dominique Garcia. "This act must not go unpunished."

Justice Minister Eric Dupond-Moretti told BFM TV: "Absolutely everything will be done to find the perpetrators of this despicable crime.

"These are people for whom life means nothing. They will be arrested, judged and punished according to the crime they committed."

He added two of the three injured officers are in a critical condition.

The attack has sparked a nationwide outcry - with a day of blockades dubbed "Dead Prisons Day" announced in jails across France today as prison officer unions respond in anger to Tuesday's attack.

Local media on Wednesday reported demonstrations outside of prisons across the country - including in the French capital Paris, Rouen, Nice, Grasse, Draguignan and Amiens.

Footage shows a gunman at the scene. Pic: Snapchat/Yan78780

'It was a massacre'

In Yvelines, 130 people blocked a remand centre and set fire to wooden pallets, Le Parisien reported.

Inside, around 15 prison staff went about their everyday jobs - compared with the 40 usually onsite.

In addition, the day's prisoner transportations and visits were cancelled, according to the newspaper.

Hubert Gratraud, a union representative, said: "There is an awareness of the dangerousness. We need resources and training. We need to get as close as possible to the reality on the ground: anything can happen."

"People were shot at point-blank range, it was a massacre, a butchery," said Ronan Roudaut, another union official.

A minute's silence was also held across the French criminal justice system including prisons and courtrooms at 11am local time in addition to the symbolic 24-hour shutdown of jails.

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Outside Evreux jail a man lit candles for the guards killed and injured in the prison van ambush - and for his pal who was shot dead in a shooting he blamed on Amra.

He took seven tea lights from his pockets and laid them in a line beside the towering, metal jail doors, his hands shaking as he lit the wicks.

The man, who would not give his name, told Sky's crime correspondent Martin Brunt: "I've come here because that man killed my friend and I'm here to honour the others he killed yesterday."

He said his friend was one of two men killed in a car attacked by gunmen on an estate in Evreux last year, an attack he said was one of the various alleged crimes Amra was being question about.

A fire burns as prison staff block the entrance of a detention centre  in Val De Reuil, France. Pic: Reuters

'Assassination attempt'

Police sources said fugitive gangster Amra was involved in international drug dealing, a suspect in a kidnap and murder case in Marseille, and had ties to the city's powerful "Blacks" gang.

He had recently been sentenced to 18 months for burglary in the suburbs of Evreux, northwest France, reported BFM TV.

The French broadcaster said his nickname was La Mouche - or "The Fly" in English.

A prison source told Le Parisien that Amra tried to saw the bars off his cell a few days ago - with the criminal reportedly put in solitary confinement afterwards.

The publication said he is suspected of having ordered an assassination attempt - linked to drugs - targeting a Frenchman in Spain in the summer of 2023.

It added Amra, born in Rouen in northern France, was also re-evaluated as 'Escort 3' risk category, making more guards necessary during transportation.

Read more: Who is 'The Fly'?

A manhunt is underway for the attackers who fled with the prisoner Mohamed Amra after the ambush.

Dangerous fugitive's mum speaks

Amra's mother told RTL she had no idea her son had planned an escape.

"I went to Baumettes to see him, he was in solitary confinement, I went to [the prison of] Evreux once. He spoke normally, he didn't show me anything. I don't understand," she said.

"They carry him around from right to left, they put him in solitary confinement instead of judging him once and for all."

She said she "broke down" and "cried" when she found out what had happened.

"It makes me sick. How can lives be taken like that?" she said of the two fatalities.

"I don't know what's going on in his head, he's not talking to me. He's my son and he doesn't talk to me about anything," she added.

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prison travel warrant

'We're on a path to Mexicanisation'

Right-wing politicians said the brazenness of the assault showed the government had lost its grip on drug crime, comparing France to countries with longstanding reputations for endemic gang violence.

"We're on a path to Mexicanisation," Bruno Retailleau, leader of the main centre-right opposition party in the French senate, said in a radio interview.

The attack came on the same day the senate released a report on drug trafficking, warning the country faced a "tipping point" from rising violence.

We must "catch the bastards who did this and put them out of harm's way," said French politician Adrien Quatennens on Sud Radio.

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Crime and Public Safety | 3rd suspect pleads guilty in Green Valley Ranch…

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Crime and public safety | 3rd suspect pleads guilty in green valley ranch arson that killed 5, agrees to 60 years in prison, kevin bui will be formally sentenced on july 2 as part of plea deal with prosecutors.

Denver police in 2020 released these images of three masked suspects in the fatal Green Valley Ranch arson fire.

Kevin Bui, 20, agreed to serve 60 years in prison as part of his agreement to plead guilty to two counts of second-degree murder, though he will not be sentenced until July 2.

Sixty other counts against Bui were dismissed as part of the deal with prosecutors, as was a second, separate case in which he was accused of bringing drugs into jail in June 2022.

“Guilty,” Bui responded when asked how he pleaded. He wore a jail uniform and sat handcuffed with his defense attorneys. His parents watched the hearing from a few feet away, listening with the help of a Vietnamese interpreter.

Bui could have faced as many as 48 years in prison on each second-degree murder count.

Bui was 16 when he set the Aug. 5, 2020, fire that killed two children and three adult relatives in a home on Truckee Street. He and two other teenagers — Gavin Seymour and Dillon Siebert — intentionally set the family’s house on fire in the middle of the night because Bui mistakenly thought someone who had stolen his phone lived in the house. The trio set the house on fire as revenge, court testimony has shown.

Djibril Diol, 29; his wife Adja Diol, 23; and their daughter Khadija Diol, 1, died in the blaze, along with Djibril’s sister, Hassan Diol, 25; and her 6-month-old daughter Hawa Baye. Dijibril tried to lead his wife and daughter out of the inferno, making it to a set of stairs near the door before they collapsed.

Photo taken the family photo of Djibril Diol, center, at the press conference of Denver Police at Denver Police Crime Laboratory in Denver, Colorado on Wednesday. Jan. 27, 2021. Denver police arrested three teenagers on suspicion of first-degree murder in connection with the Aug. arson fire. That overnight house fire at 5312 N. Truckee St. killed Djibril Diol, his wife, daughter, sister and niece.

Bui is the last of the teenagers to plead guilty. Siebert, who was 14 at the time, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in 2022 and was sentenced to three years in juvenile detention followed by seven years in prison. Seymour, who was 16, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in January and was sentenced to 40 years in prison .

After the hearing, a man who declined to give his name but was identified in court as Bui’s father, Thuan Bui, spoke briefly with reporters.

“We accept it,” he said of the guilty plea. He added that he and his wife would likely not return to court for the July sentencing.

The teenagers planned the fire for weeks and then tried to cover their tracks after the killings, searching online for information on the fire and about the prison sentence for murder. They were caught on ghostly surveillance video wearing masks and dark sweatshirts during the attack, which for weeks was investigators’ only lead in the case.

Investigators tied the teens to the killings by using a controversial search warrant that required Google to turn over any users worldwide who searched particular keywords in a particular time frame. In this case, Denver police compelled Google to turn over information about anyone who had searched the address of the Truckee Street home during the 15 days leading up to the fire.

The cases against Seymour and Bui were stalled for several months while the Colorado Supreme Court considered the legality of that search warrant . The justices  upheld the warrant in October , allowing the cases against the teenagers to move forward.

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Man sentenced to 14 years in prison for ambushing Phoenix police in 2022

A man who ambushed and nearly killed two Phoenix police officers in 2022 has been sentenced to over a decade behind bars.

On May 9, Devonte Thornton, 31, was sentenced to serve 14 years in prison.

Shortly after 1 a.m. on March 13, 2022, Thornton's younger brother, Javon Beasley, led Detective Alex Kofsky and Officer Hayden Heigel past an apartment building near 27th and Maryland avenues, according to the Maricopa County Attorney's Office. The two officers were tailing Beasley's vehicle as part of an arrest warrant operation, and when the officer's vehicle approached the building, Thornton opened fire.

Heigel, who was the passenger, was hit by one of the bullets in his right arm, while Kofsky suffered an injury in his left eye due to shattering glass from the bullet. In all, 18 shell casings were recovered at the scene.

“The officers were inches away from death,” said County Attorney Rachel Mitchell. “We know that the work of a police officer is dangerous as they put themselves in harm’s way, but this was not just being in harm’s way; this was an attempt against their lives.”

Thornton was arrested later that day.

Thornton had two felony convictions in Missouri and a penchant for going after police, according to the state's sentencing memorandum submitted by prosecutors. 

“This defendant has expressed a willingness to target and attack uniformed police officers to serve his criminal interest,” the memorandum read.  

Phoenix police: the highest paid in the state, would get 2.5% bonus in proposed contract

An ambush attack on uniformed police officers

Last month, Thornton pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of aggravated assault. During Thornton's sentencing, however, prosecutor Dan Fisher emphasized to the court that this was an ambush attack on uniformed police officers who could have easily been killed, according to the County Attorney's Office.

Thornton's "intention was to take our lives," said Kofsky in a victim impact statement. Thornton's actions caused "irreparable damage" to them, he said.

"We cannot accept cowardly acts like this ... and we must hold offenders like the defendant to the highest level of accountability possible," Kofsky said.

Prosecutors' decision to offer aggravated assault for plea deal

In February 2022, the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office indicted Thornton on two counts of attempting to commit second-degree murder and two counts of aggravated assault.

By April 2023, Thornton signed a plea deal, admitting to one count of aggravated assault and agreeing to a 14-year prison sentence. 

Jeanine L'Ecuyer, an MCAO spokesperson, said that under Arizona law, being found guilty of aggravated assault against police officers means a possible 14 years without early parole sentence, while a guilty verdict of attempted second-degree murder comes with a range of 7 to 21 years and a presumptive 10 years.

In this case, prosecutors decided to go with the aggravated assault plea because it offered a greater certainty of more time than the presumptive sentence for second-degree murder, and an issue with a witness misidentifying Thornton could have hurt their case.

Beasley pled guilty to unlawful flight from law enforcement and was sentenced to three years probation. 

Officer says he felt guilty for what happened to his friend and colleague

Kofsky, who referred to his partner Heigel as his best friend, remembers applying a tourniquet to Heigel to stop the life-threatening bleeding due to his gunshot wound.

"After the incident, I replayed it over and over in my head," said Kofsky. "I had to process watching my best friend get shot next to me and narrowly missing death. I had to process how powerless I felt in that moment."

Kofsky's actions to save Heigel's life earned him the Medal of Life Saving, Heigel said.

Heigel wrote he would forever be grateful to Kofsky but also felt guilty for what happened to him. 

“I had asked him to ride with me that day as we were understaffed and accepting volunteers to come help,” he wrote.

An eight-year hiring freeze that ended in 2016 limited the department's staffing levels, and in 2019 , the department began losing more police than they could hire . Last year marked the first year since in which the department had a net gain of officers.

Officers say the experience has changed their lives, approach to work

Heigel's right arm required surgery after the attack, leading to partial permanent numbness, limited mobility and pain throughout his limb.

"Every day I have pain and it's something I'm still learning how to live with," said Heigel in a victim impact statement. "I can no longer do simple things like throw a ball. The defendant took those things from me and I will never get them back."

Heigel, who has a wife and 1-year-old daughter, said his injuries have affected both his personal life and professional goals, citing his thwarted ambition to join the SWAT team.

Thornton "didn't consider my family or what would be taken away from them, or what he would be taking from me by his actions," said Heigel. "He reinforced that evil does exist."

Both Kofsky and Heigel reflected on the "heightened sense of vigilance" they now feel while on duty, with the "lasting effects" of dread, anxiety and defenselessness causing difficulties for the two officers as they readjust to work.

Though they share similar trauma, Heigel and Kofsky disagreed on Thornton’s sentence.

“I had a voice when 14 years was offered as a plea deal, and I think it more than fair for an attempt on my life, my partner's life, and an attack on a police officer," Heigel said in his letter. "I hope that it is a sentence that prevents further harm to others and provides an opportunity to truly rehabilitate. We cannot condone or stand for these attacks.”

Given the risks of taking the case to trial, Kofsky agreed with prosecutors on offering a plea deal. But in his letter to the court, he described a sense of imbalance.

"His intention was to take our lives when he pulled the trigger 18 times and it was only luck that I was not struck in the head and killed," Kofsky wrote. "14 years is not a severe enough sentence for the attempted murder of two police officers and critically injuring one."

"I will never be the same person I was after that night and there is nothing that can make that right," he said.

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' class=

How dificult is it to book a train ticket at the station. I will be arriving to Ulyanovsk and stay for 2 weeks. I want to get a train to Kazan and maybe Samara if I have the time. Any idea if it is dificult to book trains using a Us credit card? does it have to be cash? and can I get tickets for same day travel? If same day travel is difficult, can I purchaethe tickets at the trainstation in Moscow?

5 replies to this topic

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It is not difficult at all, you can do it over internet as well ( http://www.rzd.ru ), at any Rusiian train station or ti cket terminals at train stations. Visa and Mastercard are fine, AmEx is not...Enjoy!

Thanks! I appreciate the reply

prison travel warrant

//How dificult is it to book a train ticket at the station

It's not difficult if the train is not sold out

does the station have lockers? will be arriving eay before the hotel check in time

With automated lockers it varies from station to station, but all major stations have a manned 24/7 storage unit.

  • Transfer from Ulyanovsk to Samara May 29, 2018
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  • From Togliatti/Samara to Ulyanovsk May 22, 2013
  • Getting from Moscow to Ulyanovsk Sep 07, 2007

IMAGES

  1. Local Man’s Quest for Freedom to Travel Leads to Arrest Warrant

    prison travel warrant

  2. What To Do If There Is A Warrant For Your Arrest

    prison travel warrant

  3. Arrest warrant issued for travel agent accused of bilking dozens of

    prison travel warrant

  4. ARREST WARRANT APPLICATION by Record Journal

    prison travel warrant

  5. Gosar Votes to Prohibit TSA From Accepting Arrest Warrants as

    prison travel warrant

  6. What Is An Indictment Warrant

    prison travel warrant

VIDEO

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COMMENTS

  1. Planning for your release from prison

    The prison may give you a travel warrant when leaving prison. This will pay for your travel back home. Most people will get a discharge grant when released from prison. This is a small amount of money which can help with immediate living expenses. Some people will not be given a discharge grant. Reasons you may not get a discharge grant are if you:

  2. Warrant While Incarcerated: Multiple Warrants

    An overview of what happens if you have multiple warrants and receive an additional warrant while being incarcerated. People in jail or prison may discover that a warrant for their arrest is outstanding from another county, state, or the federal government. Having a warrant while incarcerated can prevent your release or result in loss of ...

  3. Arrest or Detention of a U.S. Citizen Abroad

    In Case of an Arrest Overseas: Ask the prison authorities to notify the U.S. embassy or consulate. Reach out to the closest U.S. embassy or consulate to let us know of the arrest. Consular Assistance to U.S. Prisoners. When a U.S. citizen is arrested overseas, he or she may be initially confused and disoriented.

  4. Traveling Overseas With a Felony On Your Record

    Assuming you are a U.S. citizen, you should not have any trouble obtaining a U.S. passport or traveling outside the U.S. with a felony conviction on your record. However, if you happen to owe $2,500 or more in back child support, your U.S. passport will be denied, but it won't be denied for a felony conviction on your record.

  5. Traveling Abroad With A Criminal Conviction

    Europe and the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom is one of the few European nations that restrict entry for justice-impacted individuals. In general, if you were convicted of a crime punishable by 23 months or more under British law or served more than 12 months in prison, you will likely be denied entry.

  6. PDF Fact Sheet Prisoner Transportation

    2020. The U.S. Marshals' Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation System manages the coordination, scheduling and secure handling of prisoners in federal custody, transporting them to detention facilities, courts and correctional institutions via a network of aircraft, buses, vans and cars. JPATS is the largest transporter of prisoners in ...

  7. Rail Warrant Accounts

    Rail warrants can be exchanged for the majority of rail tickets available across the National Rail network. When a warrant is presented at a station, the ticket clerk will look at the details completed and then issue the cheapest ticket available for the journey requested. Normal ticket prices are applicable and there are no special discounts ...

  8. The Hardman Directory

    A travel warrant details the journey requirements, for example, the station nearest to the prison to the station nearest home. This will be exchanged for a ticket at the station. The prison may also provide transport from the establishment to the nearest station, if there are difficulties (e.g. a disability) in getting to the nearest station.

  9. Traveling With a Criminal Record

    Being honest if and when asked about criminal convictions is always advisable. The United Kingdom (UK), however, is one of the few European nations that will restrict entry for those with criminal records. If a crime was committed and punishment amounted to incarceration for 12 months or more, the UK will likely deny entry to that person.

  10. Travel Restrictions While on Probation

    Another standard probation condition is having travel restricted. The types of restrictions that are imposed often depend on the circumstances of the case, the defendant's habits, the defendant's employment and other factors. It is important that the criminal defendant has a clear understanding of the conditions of his or her probation ...

  11. Discharged UK prisoners with Covid-19 symptoms given travel warrants

    Discharged prisoners who have either tested positive for Covid-19 or shown symptoms of the illness have been given travel warrants to use on public transport to return to their homes, the Guardian ...

  12. Finances When Leaving Prison

    A travel warrant - This will pay for your travel back home (to anywhere in the British Isles or Republic of Ireland). A discharge grant - If you're wondering how much money do prisoners get when released, UK legislation does include a discharge grant of £46 to help cover your living expenses during your first week out of prison. However ...

  13. Can You Travel Abroad If You Have a Felony Conviction?

    Wanting to travel once released from prison is not unusual. And, for the most part, you should be able to do so. Like anyone else, you will need a passport for most international travel. But, in most cases, someone with a felony conviction can still get a passport after release. However, there are some specific circumstances that might stop you ...

  14. Help with housing when you leave prison

    a travel warrant or tickets. an £82.39 cash payment - often called a prison discharge grant . You must have spent at least 2 weeks as a sentenced prisoner to get these. Prison governors can also make a discretionary payment of up to £50 direct to a housing provider if this will give you somewhere to stay on release.

  15. Passport Information for Law Enforcement

    We use a system to check the name and verify the identity of every passport applicant. Law enforcement agencies may ask us to enter a subject's name in this system. We will let you know before a passport is issued, even if there is no warrant or court order. In your agency's request to add a subject's name to this system, you must include:

  16. Pre-digital travel warrants and passes for service personnel, UK

    Travel warrants and passes for absence for men and women in the forces didn't significantly change until the digital era. In fact, it was more or less the same for most of the 20th century, including in the First and Second World Wars. This page describes the system in detail with illustrations and explains why it was necessary.

  17. Written questions and answers

    All prison leavers are given a travel warrant or fares paid to their destination within the UK, the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man or the Republic of Ireland. An additional payment of up to £50 may also be paid directly to a genuine accommodation provider to help the prison leaver secure a release address.

  18. Can Felon's Travel Outside the US: What Countries Can You Travel to

    Felons can travel outside the country after completing their sentence or post prison sentence such as probation or electronic monitoring. The fifth amendment protects your right to travel. A felony conviction may disqualify you from getting a visa. If you have completed your sentence, you may apply for a passport.

  19. PDF Issuing of travel warrants to detainees attending First-tier Tribunals

    Processes Affected: This Detention Services Order (DSO) sets out instructions on the procedures for issuing travel warrants to detainees attending First-tier Tribunals (Immigration and Asylum Chamber). Assumptions: All staff will have the necessary knowledge to follow these procedures. Notes: This guidance replaces Detention Services Order 10/ ...

  20. DOC Gov.uk

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  21. France prisoner escape: Day of blockades in French prisons as inmate

    Two prison officers who were killed in an attack on a police convoy in France have been named - as Interpol issued a red notice search warrant for escaped prisoner Mohamed Amra, nicknamed "The Fly ...

  22. Yekaterinburg to Ulyanovsk

    Hi. I am planning to travel from Ekaterinburg to Ulyanovsk on the 20th of June. There seems to be no direct trains in the rzd website. Is there one or what are the alternate ways to get there

  23. Kevin Bui pleads guilty in Green Valley Ranch arson that killed 5

    Bui could have faced as many as 48 years in prison on each second-degree murder count. Bui was 16 when he set the Aug. 5, 2020, fire that killed two children and three adult relatives in a home on ...

  24. From Togliatti/Samara to Ulyanovsk

    Answer 1 of 4: Hello, in 2 weeks I have to go to Togliatti for meeting and next day I have to move to Ulyanovsk... any hint how to do it + costs? Taxi? Bus? Thanks for reply!

  25. Devonte Thornton sentenced to 14 years in prison for 2022 shooting

    0:36. A man who ambushed and nearly killed two Phoenix police officers in 2022 has been sentenced to over a decade behind bars. On May 9, Devonte Thornton, 31, was sentenced to serve 14 years in ...

  26. Train Tickets at Station

    Answer 1 of 5: How dificult is it to book a train ticket at the station. I will be arriving to Ulyanovsk and stay for 2 weeks. I want to get a train to Kazan and maybe Samara if I have the time. Any idea if it is dificult to book trains using a Us credit card...

  27. Исправительная колония № 9 Map

    Исправительная колония № 9 is a prison in Ulyanovsk, Ulyanovsk Oblast. Исправительная колония № 9 is situated nearby to Penal Colony No. 8 and Oktyabrsky. ... map to travel: Исправительная колония № 9. 73.fsin.su. Localities in the Area. Oktyabrsky. Town Photo: Sergey M R, CC ...