We’re sorry, this site is currently experiencing technical difficulties. Please try again in a few moments. Exception: request blocked

Security Alert May 17, 2024

Worldwide caution, update may 10, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

  • Travel Advisories |
  • Contact Us |
  • MyTravelGov |

Find U.S. Embassies & Consulates

Travel.state.gov, congressional liaison, special issuance agency, u.s. passports, international travel, intercountry adoption, international parental child abduction, records and authentications, popular links, travel advisories, mytravelgov, stay connected, legal resources, legal information, info for u.s. law enforcement, replace or certify documents.

Before You Go

Learn About Your Destination

While Abroad

Emergencies

Share this page:

Travel Advisory January 11, 2024

Nicaragua - level 3: reconsider travel.

Reissued with updates to information on arbitrary enforcement of laws.

Reconsider travel to Nicaragua due to  arbitrary enforcement of laws, the risk of wrongful detention, and limited healthcare availability . Exercise increased caution in Nicaragua due to  crime.

Country Summary : Throughout Nicaragua, government and law enforcement officials continue to target individuals and organizations seen as opponents of President Daniel Ortega and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo. U.S. citizens, including dual Nicaraguan-U.S. citizens, have been subject to revocation of Nicaraguan citizenship, reentry bans, expulsion, and other actions. The government and its affiliated groups have been reported to:

  • Arbitrarily prevent individuals from entering or departing Nicaragua by air or land for perceived associations.
  • Search personal phones, computers, and documents for anti-government content, limit photography of government property, and sometimes seize devices.
  • Systematically target individuals for political reasons, regardless of nationality, including former allies, political activists, business representatives, clergy, human rights advocates, civil society leaders, academics, and members of the press.
  • Arbitrarily target pro-democracy advocates and their family members.
  • Confiscate privately-owned land, residences, financial assets, and personal property without warning or due process.
  • Arbitrarily detain, accuse, and charge individuals with terrorism, money laundering, and organized crime offenses for political reasons without respect for fair trial guarantees.

U.S. citizen residents of Nicaragua also report increased scrutiny of alleged political speech.

U.S. citizens arrested in Nicaragua may find themselves subject to prolonged detention without charges or respect of fair trial guarantees. The judicial process lacks transparency, especially in politically motivated arrests and property dispute cases. Political influence and pressure may influence the outcome of legal proceedings.

The Department has determined the risk of wrongful detention of U.S. nationals by the Government of Nicaragua exists.

Travelers should exercise increased caution and be alert to the risks of crime, including violent crimes such as sexual assault and armed robbery.

Poor infrastructure in parts of the country limits the Embassy’s ability to assist U.S. citizens in emergencies. U.S. government personnel under Chief of Mission security responsibility may be subject to restrictions on their movements at any time.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Nicaragua.

If you decide to travel to Nicaragua:

  • Consider arrangements to depart the country quickly.
  • Ensure your U.S. passport is valid and available for a quick departure from the country, if needed.
  • Avoid demonstrations and restrict unnecessary travel.
  • Do not attempt to drive through crowds, barricades, or roadblocks.
  • Maintain adequate supplies of food, cash, potable water, and fuel in case you need to shelter in place.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Do not display signs of wealth such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program  ( STEP ) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook  and Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Nicaragua.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest  Travel Health Information  related to your travel.

Embassy Messages

View Alerts and Messages Archive

Quick Facts

Length of stay.

One page per stamp.

No (90 days or fewer). Tourist card at airport. See Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements below.

Yellow fever (in some cases, see Entry Requirements section).

Must declare $10,000 USD or more in cash.

Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Managua

Km 5 ½ Carretera Sur Managua, Nicaragua Telephone:  +(505) 2252-7100 Emergency After-Hours Telephone:  +(505) 2252-7100 Fax:  +(505) 2252-7250 Email:   [email protected]

Email:   [email protected]

Destination Description

Learn about the U.S. relationship to countries around the world.

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

The Government of Nicaragua has denied entry to or expelled U.S. citizens, including dual U.S.-Nicaraguan citizens, for political reasons including perceived support for or association with disfavored people or organizations.  The Government’s actions have been taken against NGO workers, academics, religious workers, journalists, and many others.  The Nicaraguan government has revoked residency status for foreign nationals for actions or expressions it perceives as political. Travelers attempting to leave the country have been arrested or denied permission to travel for political reasons. Immigration authorities regularly review social media for evidence of political expression or activity and warn against such activities.    

  • For visitors other than tourists , the Government of Nicaragua recommends that you pre-register your trip by following the instructions available on the Nicaraguan immigration website  (in Spanish only).  See  our website  for additional information.  
  • All travelers should have an  onward or return ticket  and  evidence of funds  to support yourself while in Nicaragua.  You must carry a valid identity document at all times, such as a U.S. driver’s license or U.S. passport.  
  • You must purchase a  tourist card for $10 USD  at the airport (exact change recommended), valid for up to a total of 90 days in any of the member countries of the  Central America-4 Border Control Agreement .  Visitors remaining longer must obtain an extension from Nicaraguan immigration or be subject to large fines.  
  • Individuals traveling from countries at risk of yellow fever transmission must show proof of yellow fever vaccination administered at least 10 days before travel to be permitted entry to Nicaragua.   
  • If you use a passport of a different nationality than you did on prior trips to Nicaragua, Nicaraguan authorities may deny you entry.  If you possess multiple nationalities, you should carry a valid passport for all of them.  If you have Nicaraguan nationality, you should have both your U.S. and Nicaraguan passports with you.  
  • You must  exit Nicaragua with the same passport used for entry .  If your U.S. passport is lost or stolen while in Nicaragua, you will need to  get a new entry stamp from Nicaraguan Immigration  before you can depart by following instructions available on the Nicaraguan immigration website (in Spanish only).  This cannot be done at the airport on departure.  
  • There is a  $42 USD tax  that must be paid upon exiting (this tax is normally included in the price of the plane ticket for air travelers).  
  • See the  U.S. Embassy website  for information regarding departure requirements for children under 18 who also are Nicaraguan citizens .  
  • Nicaraguan government authorities may search personal phones, computers, and documents for anti-government content and sometimes seize such private property.  Equipment such as binoculars, drones, or other items will generally be confiscated without a mechanism to retrieve these items later.  

Advanced Coordination Required for Volunteer Groups:  Please note that the Government of Nicaragua has forced the closure of more than 3,500 NGOs and charitable organizations.  Groups engaged in these types of activities, including the apolitical provision of basic services, may be denied entry.  You should email both the Embassy of Nicaragua in the United States ( [email protected] ) and the Nicaraguan Ministry of Foreign Affairs ( [email protected] ) to inform them of your trip and secure advance permission if you are leading one of the following types of trips, even if your group has worked in Nicaragua previously or has a local office:  

  • Volunteer mission;  
  • Charitable or medical brigade (the latter also need permission from the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health); or  
  • Assistance visit organized by NGOs, religious groups, schools, or any other group doing this type of work in Nicaragua.    

For the latest visa and entry requirements, visit the  Nicaraguan immigration website (Spanish only).  

HIV/AIDS Restrictions:   The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors or foreign residents in Nicaragua.  

Dual Nationality and International Parental Child Abduction :  Find information on  dual nationality ,  prevention of international child abduction , and  customs regulations  on our websites.  

COVID-19 Information:  As of July 21, 2023, the Nicaraguan government lifted all COVID-19 related travel restrictions.  Travelers arriving in Nicaragua do not need to provide proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test.  

Safety and Security

The Government of Nicaragua is authoritarian, limits freedom of expression and peaceful assembly, represses internal dissent, and monitors and responds to perceived threats to its authority.  Nicaragua’s Sovereign Security Law and its Terrorism and Money Laundering law allow for discretionary interpretation of often vaguely defined unlawful activities, such as threatening the peace and economic stability of Nicaragua.  Convictions under these laws have often been arbitrary and result in long prison sentences.  

Nicaraguan authorities and armed civilians in plain clothes known as “para police” may monitor, detain, deny entry to, expel, or question U.S. citizens concerning their activities, including their contact with Nicaraguan citizens.  Visitors should avoid any commentary on Nicaraguan politics or governance.  Nicaraguan authorities have subjected U.S. citizens, including dual U.S.-Nicaraguan citizens, to prolonged detentions which are often politically motivated or arbitrary.  Especially in politically motivated arrests, the judicial process has regularly been criticized as neither fair nor transparent.  

Demonstrations or strikes may occur throughout the country; in the past, the Nicaraguan government has violently suppressed them.  Avoid demonstrations and exercise extreme caution around large gatherings.  

Roads may be closed, and public transportation may be disrupted due to large crowds celebrating the following holidays:  

  • Semana Santa (the week before Easter);  
  • Repliegue Historico a Masaya (early July);  
  • July 19 celebration of the Sandinista Revolution;  
  • Celebration in Managua of Santo Domingo, the Patron Saint of the city (August 1st and August 10th);  
  • Day of the Nicaraguan Army (September 2);  
  • Nicaraguan Independence Day (September 14 and 15); and  
  • Immaculate Conception (December 8).   

Crime: Vehicle burglaries, pick-pocketing, and occasional armed robberies occur in store parking lots, on public transportation, and in open-air markets like the Oriental and Huembes Markets in Managua.  Petty street crime is common.  Police presence is extremely limited outside of major urban areas.  The Caribbean Coast’s geographical isolation further limits the U.S. Embassy’s ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens living in or visiting the area. Uniformed police and para-police commit violence and intimidate civilians throughout the country for political reasons.  

U.S. citizens have been sexually assaulted in beach resort areas. There are no forensic doctors on the Corn Islands , so victims of violent crimes, including sexual assault, must travel to Bluefields at their own expense for medical examinations and collection of evidence.  In several recent cases, police were reluctant to produce police reports or pursue charges .  Please report such incidents to the Embassy.  

Medical services outside Managua are limited, including for victims of crime.  

Exercise extreme caution when renting or driving vehicles.  In one common scam, “Good Samaritans” pull over to help change a flat tire.  While the driver is distracted, an accomplice steals the driver’s possessions.  

Due to crime and other illicit activity, U.S. government personnel under Chief of Mission security responsibility are prohibited from entering Managua’s Oriental Market and gentlemen’s clubs throughout the country.  

International Financial Scams:  See the Department of State and the FBI page for information.  

Victims of Crime: Report crimes, including sexual assault, to the local police at 118 (Nicaraguan equivalent of “911,” in Spanish).  Report serious crimes to the U.S. Embassy at 2252-7100 immediately and minor crimes during business hours.  

Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.  

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .  

The U.S. Embassy can:  

  • Help you find appropriate medical care.  
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to the police.  
  • Contact relatives or friends with your written consent.  
  • Provide a list of local attorneys.  
  • Share information on victim’s compensation programs in the United States .  
  • Provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or, limited financial support in cases of destitution.  
  • Help you find accommodation and flights home.  
  • Replace a stolen or lost passport.  

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence are encouraged to contact the U.S. Embassy for assistance.  

Coastal Disputes: Be aware of the following border disputes:  

  • Nicaragua and Colombia have an ongoing dispute over waters surrounding the San Andres Islands.  
  • The Nicaraguan Navy has challenged vessels passing through its exclusive economic zone.  
  • Nicaragua and Costa Rica have stationed security forces at Harbor Head (also called Isla Calero) at the eastern end of the San Juan River.  
  • Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador have maritime and land disputes over islands and access to fishing rights in the Gulf of Fonseca on the Pacific Coast, a closed sea under international law.  

Tourism: The tourism industry is unevenly regulated, and safety inspections for equipment and facilities are uncommon.  Hazardous areas/activities are not always identified with appropriate signage, and staff may not be trained or certified.  In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is typically available only in major cities.  In the event of a diving injury, the only hyperbaric chamber is in Puerto Cabezas, over 100 miles from Corn Island where most tourists dive.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage .  

Beach Safety: Exercise caution at the beach. U.S. citizens have drowned at Nicaraguan beaches, and in lagoons and lakes. Warning signs are not always posted.  Lifeguards and rescue equipment are not normally available.   

Hiking in volcanic or remote areas is dangerous.  Wear appropriate clothing and footwear.  Carry sufficient food, water, and communication equipment.  If you travel to remote areas, hire a reputable local guide. Nicaraguan law requires tourists hire a local guide for several volcanoes, including the two volcanoes on Ometepe Island (Maderas and Concepcion).  

Disaster Preparedness: Nicaragua is prone to earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and volcanic eruptions.  If you are at a coastal area when an earthquake occurs, move swiftly to higher ground (when safe to do so) to avoid possible tsunamis.  

In the event of an earthquake, volcanic eruption, or other natural disaster, U.S. citizens should pay close attention to local media reports. 

  • Follow the guidance of local authorities and monitor the websites of the Nicaraguan Institute for Territorial Studies ( INETER ) and the Nicaraguan Emergency Alert System ( SINAPRED ).  
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive important emergency information. 
  • See the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) website for information about disaster preparedness.  

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws.  If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.  

  • Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Nicaragua are severe, even for possession of small amounts of illegal drugs.  
  • Even with a prescription, marijuana is illegal in Nicaragua.  

There are severe penalties, including imprisonment, for domestic violence, psychological abuse, and non-payment of child support.  

Arrest Notification: Nicaraguan authorities do not always notify the U.S. Embassy when a U.S. citizen has been arrested or detained, especially if the arrestee has dual nationality.  If you are arrested or detained, ask both police and prison officials and friends or family to notify the U.S. Embassy.  After the U.S. Embassy learns of an arrest, it may be several days or weeks before the Government of Nicaragua permits a consular official to visit.  In the case of dual U.S.-Nicaraguan nationals, the U.S. Embassy may be denied consular access.  See our webpage for further information.  

  • The judiciary does not enjoy independence from political influence.  U.S. citizens who have been arrested in Nicaragua may find themselves subject to prolonged detention without charges, often for political reasons.  
  • Authorities have ignored or significantly delayed implementing judicial orders to release, deport, expel, or transfer prisoners.  

Purchasing Property: Exercise extreme caution before investing in property.  The Nicaraguan government may confiscate privately owned land or residences without warning or compensation.  Armed individuals have taken over privately owned land.  U.S. citizens have been arrested or threatened over property disputes.  See our website for more information.   

Customs Regulations: U.S. citizens planning to import items should contract a recognized local customs broker for assistance well in advance of their visit.  The U.S. Embassy is unable to assist with the customs or import process.  

  • Nicaraguan customs officials may delay or block import of goods, including items intended for donation.  
  • If you are planning to bring vehicles or household goods, consult Nicaraguan customs officials prior to shipment.  
  • When entering with your vehicle, you must have the original registration and title.  
  • Drones and similar devices are not permitted and will be confiscated by Nicaraguan customs authorities.  
  • Photography equipment, videography equipment, and binoculars may be subject to seizure by the Nicaraguan customs authorities.  
  • Approval from the Ministry of Health’s Pharmacy Department is required to import large quantities of medicine, even for charitable purposes.  
  • Before excavating archaeological materials or buying historical artifacts, you must consult with the National Patrimony Directorate of the Nicaraguan Institute of Culture.  Otherwise, severe criminal penalties may apply.   

Faith-Based Travelers: See the following webpages for details:  

  • Faith-Based Travel Information   
  • International Religious Freedom Report   
  • Human Rights Report   
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers   
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad   

LGBTQI+ Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Nicaragua.  While violence against LGBTQI+ travelers is uncommon, widespread discrimination exists.  See our LGBTQI+ Travel Information page and the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details .   

Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs):   The government of Nicaragua recently forced the closure of more than 3,500 NGOs and charitable organizations.  Employees of NGOs and volunteers supporting NGOs may be denied entry to Nicaragua.  Please see “Advanced Coordination Required for Volunteer Groups” above.  

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: There is limited or no accessibility assistance for public transportation and in many public areas.  There are few sidewalks and pedestrian road crossings.  

While Nicaraguan law prohibits discrimination against persons with physical and mental disabilities, in practice such discrimination is widespread in employment, education, access to health care, and the provision of state services.    

Students: See our Students Abroad page.    

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers .  

Government hospitals are understaffed and some hospitals throughout the country may not be able to assist in emergencies.  Only basic, limited emergency medical services are available outside Managua.  

  • Ambulance services provide transportation and basic first aid only and are unreliable throughout the country.  
  • Physicians and hospital personnel frequently do not speak English.  
  • Tap water is not reliably potable.  Drink only purified bottled water.  

 The following diseases are prevalent:  

  • Mosquito-borne diseases (e.g., Zika , Dengue fever , and Chikungunya )  
  • Upper respiratory viruses (e.g., Influenza)  
  • Infectious bacterial diseases (e.g., Typhoid fever and Leptospirosis)  
  • Intestinal illnesses (e.g., Giardia)  
  • Rabies  

The Department of State does not pay medical bills.  Please be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas.   

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Even with health insurance, most care providers overseas require cash payments prior to providing service.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage .  We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.  

If traveling with prescription medication, review the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health's Pharmacy Department guidance on entering with pharmaceutical products.  Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging labeled with your doctor’s prescribing information.  

  Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

Further health information:   

  • World Health Organization   
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)   

COVID-19 Testing Information:   

  • PCR tests are available only through the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health.  The Nicaraguan government prohibits the import of COVID-19 tests.  The U.S. Embassy has received reports of tests being confiscated from U.S. citizen travelers upon arrival in Nicaragua.  
  • All testing in Nicaragua is carried out at the National Center for Diagnosis and Reference (CNDR) and the Nicaraguan Institute for Health Investigation (INIS) from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Test results are returned the same day between 3:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. and can usually be downloaded after 4:00 pm.  
  • Travelers wishing to be tested must present an identification card (cedula) or passport and their flight itinerary.  The $150 fee must be deposited in either Banpro account 10010012253774 (U.S. dollars) or 10010002253784 (cordobas), both registered under TGR-MINSA.  Cash payments can be made at Conchita Palacios National Health Complex or at the INIS cashier.  

COVID-19 Vaccine Information:   

Sputnik V, AstraZeneca, Covishield, and Pfizer Vaccines are available in Nicaragua for U.S. citizens to receive. Visit the FDA’s website to learn more about FDA-approved vaccines in the United States.   

Covid-19 Medical Evacuation:   

Click here for a list of private companies offering medical evacuation of COVID-19 patients from Nicaragua to the United States. U.S. citizens seeking information about medical evacuation of COVID-19 patients should contact these private companies directly.  

LOCAL RESOURCES:     

  • The health ministry has created a 24/7 hotline to call regarding COVID-19 in Nicaragua. To reach the hotline, call +505-8418-9953.  
  • Managua Airport website with airline contact information.  

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Main roads between major cities are generally paved and in good condition. Other roads may have potholes, lack shoulders, be poorly lit and narrow.  Speed bumps are often poorly marked.  During the rainy season, roads may become flooded or have additional damage.  Horse carts, livestock, and pedestrians crossing roads in front of oncoming traffic are common, even on major roads in the main cities.  Most roads on the Caribbean Coast are unpaved.  Road signs throughout the country are limited or non-existent.  Road travel after dark is hazardous in all areas.  Carry a cellphone in case of emergency, but understand cell reception may be spotty in many areas of the country.  Do not drive outside urban areas after dark.  

Traffic Laws: If you are involved in a traffic accident, you must wait for the police and insurance company representatives to arrive before you move your vehicle.   However, especially during overnight hours, police and insurance companies may not respond.  Do not move your vehicle, unless a police officer tells you to do so, or you will be legally liable for the accident.    

Nicaraguan law requires that police take a driver into custody for:  

  • Driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol (the legal limit is 0.05% blood alcohol content); or  
  • For being involved in an accident that causes serious injury or death.  

The minimum detention period is 48 hours.  In fatal accidents, drivers are held until they reach a legal settlement with the victim’s family. To avoid liability, consider hiring a professional driver through a reputable hotel.  

All drivers must carry:  

  • Driver’s license;  
  • Proof of insurance;  
  • Vehicle registration;  
  • Emergency triangle;  
  • Fire extinguisher; and  
  • Inspection and registration stickers   

These regulations also apply to drivers in rental vehicles.  Penalties for not having any of the above include fines and towing.  For more information, check with the Nicaraguan National Police or the Embassy of Nicaragua. 

Traffic Stops: Transit police often stop vehicles with either local or foreign license plates.  

  • If transit police demand a bribe in lieu of a fine, request a receipt and the officer’s name and badge number.  
  • To report mistreatment by police, email a complaint to Nicaragua’s National Police and forward a copy to the U.S. Consular Section in Managua .  
  • If you receive a traffic violation, police will confiscate your driver’s license until you pay the fine at a bank.  Depending on your length of stay, you may not be able to recover your license in a timely manner.    

Public Transportation: Buses, moto-taxis, and ferries often lack proper safety equipment.  

  • U.S. government personnel are not permitted to use public buses and most taxis (including moto-taxis) due to safety and crime concerns.  
  • Use only licensed taxis recommended by airport authorities, major hotels, restaurants, or other trusted sources.  
  • Exercise caution in the face of possibly overloaded or unsafe ferries and boats.  Check with local naval or police authorities about the safety of being on the water in local weather conditions.  Most vessels provide insufficient numbers of life vests and other safety equipment.   

Airports in remote locales often have short airstrips, minimal safety equipment, and little boarding security.  

See our Road Safety page for more information and the Nicaraguan Institute of Tourism and National Transit Authority .    

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) assessed the government of Nicaragua’s Civil Aviation Authority as compliant with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Nicaragua’s air carrier operations in 2015.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page .  

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Nicaragua should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts on the Maritime Administration website.  Information may also be posted to the websites of the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency .  

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in Nicaragua . For additional IPCA-related information, please see the International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA ) report.

Travel Advisory Levels

Assistance for u.s. citizens, nicaragua map, learn about your destination, enroll in step.

Enroll in STEP

Subscribe to get up-to-date safety and security information and help us reach you in an emergency abroad.

Recommended Web Browsers: Microsoft Edge or Google Chrome.

Make two copies of all of your travel documents in case of emergency, and leave one with a trusted friend or relative.

Afghanistan

Antigua and Barbuda

Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, and Saba

Bosnia and Herzegovina

British Virgin Islands

Burkina Faso

Burma (Myanmar)

Cayman Islands

Central African Republic

Cote d Ivoire

Curaçao

Czech Republic

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Dominican Republic

El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea

Eswatini (Swaziland)

Falkland Islands

France (includes Monaco)

French Guiana

French Polynesia

French West Indies

Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint Martin, and Saint Barthélemy (French West Indies)

Guinea-Bissau

Isle of Man

Israel, The West Bank and Gaza

Liechtenstein

Marshall Islands

Netherlands

New Caledonia

New Zealand

North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of Korea)

Papua New Guinea

Philippines

Republic of North Macedonia

Republic of the Congo

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Sao Tome and Principe

Saudi Arabia

Sierra Leone

Sint Maarten

Solomon Islands

South Africa

South Korea

South Sudan

Switzerland

The Bahamas

Timor-Leste

Trinidad and Tobago

Turkmenistan

Turks and Caicos Islands

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom

Vatican City (Holy See)

External Link

You are about to leave travel.state.gov for an external website that is not maintained by the U.S. Department of State.

Links to external websites are provided as a convenience and should not be construed as an endorsement by the U.S. Department of State of the views or products contained therein. If you wish to remain on travel.state.gov, click the "cancel" message.

You are about to visit:

  • [email protected]
  • Legal Advice

Suggestions

visit nicaragua from haiti

Nicaragua is moving towards sustainable future with the El Jaguar solar plant in León.

These celebrities have arrived in Nicaragua in 2024

These celebrities have arrived in Nicaragua in 2024

Somoto Canyon

Somoto Canyon, an unforgettable adventure in Nicaragua

visit nicaragua from haiti

5 scenarios to obtain beautiful postcards of Ometepe

San Ramón Waterfall, Altagracia

In the middle of a freshwater lake is the paradisiacal Ometepe Island, a sanctuary that preserves the flora and fauna of this jewel, located in the department of Rivas. Due to its wide natural offering, the island has various places where you can portray iconic, unique and fascinating moments. La Paloma Airport, Moyogalpa In the municipality of Moyogalpa and on the way to Altagracia, La Paloma Airport is located. In recent years it has become popular with photographs of visitors who are amazed by the splendid view that the area has, at the end of the runway the imposing volcano…

Get to know Nicaragua with this travel guide

guia-de-viaje-nicaragua

The Travel Amazing, published on its web portal, a travel guide to discover the land of lakes and volcanoes, emphasizing that the country has the best roads in Central America, facilitating movement from one destination to another. Nicaragua has impressive natural landscapes, it is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, it has 19 volcanoes and 7 are still active, a history woven with threads and a culture that will make you fall in love with this corner of the world. The guide takes you to tour 4 Nicaraguan cities, starting with its capital, Managua, starts with a brief historical review,…

3 unique viewpoints in Nicaragua

visit nicaragua from haiti

Due to its great natural, cultural, historical and tourist wealth, Nicaragua has much to offer visitors, who can tour the beautiful Central American country to live unique and unforgettable experiences. We invite you to this tour where two differentiating elements converge: unparalleled panoramic views and intersections. Peña de la Cruz, Jinotega More than 100 kilometers from the capital Managua, between fog and the pleasant climate that surrounds the city of Jinotega, is the Peña de la Cruz hill, a beautiful natural viewpoint which is very popular with those who wish to test their physical resistance, who, in addition, long to…

Ometepe experienced a “Fire and Water” weekend

visit nicaragua from haiti

On March 2nd and 3rd, 300 athletes from different parts of the world gathered at Santo Domingo Beach, Isla de Ometepe, to experience the Fire and Water ultra marathon, which combines trail running with climbing and descending volcanoes; an event that has gained international recognition and attracts runners from around the world seeking a unique challenge in a spectacular setting. The race has been held in the country since 2008, with Isla de Ometepe chosen as the venue by its organizers. In 2024, after a three-year hiatus due to the Covid-19 pandemic, it was successfully held with the participation of…

Nicaragua will build the Punta Huete International Airport

visit nicaragua from haiti

On February 9th, the National Assembly approved two credit agreements to finance the project for the reconstruction, expansion, and modernization of the Punta Huete International Airport. The credits total more than 14.5 billion córdobas (2,874,652,142.91 yuan). The airport terminal “will have the capacity to serve up to 3.5 million passengers annually… It will reduce the number of air connections between Nicaragua and Asia, Europe, Africa, and Oceania, making our country an attractive destination for tourists from these continents.” The agreements were signed between the Government of Reconciliation and National Unity, through the Ministry of Finance and Public Credit, and China…

Ometepe: Setting for the Fuego y Agua Ultra Marathon

visit nicaragua from haiti

“The land of lakes and volcanoes is preparing to welcome more than 300 athletes to the Fuego y Agua ultra marathon, which will be held on Ometepe Island on March 2nd and 3rd.” Anasha Campbell, co-director of the Nicaraguan Institute of Tourism, INTUR, highlighted that this event showcases and promotes the natural beauties that Nicaragua possesses, welcoming the athletes who will be participating in the event. She emphasized the warmth that characterizes the nation, stating, “Our people welcome visitors with open arms and hearts, making them feel like just another Nicaraguan. We hope they enjoy not only the event but…

Travel across Lake Cocibolca to the island of Ometepe with the new fast ferries.

visit nicaragua from haiti

The fast ferries Solentiname and Cocibolca come to ensure agility, safety, and comfort for national and foreign tourists, with commercial and private services lasting one hour and ten minutes for Granada – Ometepe and 20 minutes for San Jorge – Ometepe. These vessels are equipped with air conditioning and airplane seats to provide comfort to travelers. In addition, their speed allows them to move from one point to another in a short time. They were built by Nicaraguan hands with the collaboration of German engineers, making these works innovative. More information:  +505 86845051…

“Top 7 Must-Do Experiences When Visiting Nicaragua”

visit nicaragua from haiti

“Discover the diversity of Nicaragua by exploring these seven must-visit destinations. From the picturesque colonial streets of Granada to the majestic waterfalls of the Tisey Estanzuela Reserve, each place offers a unique experience. Marvel at the natural spectacle of the Masaya Volcano, and relax on the pristine beaches of San Juan del Sur. With history, nature, and adventure around every corner, Nicaragua awaits you with open arms.” I. Explore Granada This charming colonial city is one of Nicaragua’s most popular destinations. Wander through its colorful streets, visit historic landmarks like the Cathedral of Granada, and enjoy a boat tour of…

visit nicaragua from haiti

Advertisment

  • Passports   >  
  • Nicaragua   >  
  • Destinations   >  

Colourful houses line a street in León Department, Nicaragua

Visa requirements for citizens of Haiti travelling to Nicaragua :

Visa required. Citizens of Haiti require a visa to travel to Nicaragua.

visit nicaragua from haiti

Check current Covid-19 entry requirements before travelling.

— FAST FACTS —

Capital: Managua

Location: Central America

Currency: Cordoba Oro

More Destinations

Visa requirements for

El Salvador

Clipperton island.

visit nicaragua from haiti

We use cookies to provide a better online experience. By using this website you agree to the use of cookies and to our terms of use.

Entry Status Logo

Do Haitian Citizens Require a Visa to Visit Nicaragua?

 Haiti Passport

Are you from Haiti? Are you planning to visit Nicaragua? If you answered yes, then this article is ideal for you.

Before you book your flight, you may be thinking: Do Haitian citizens need a visa to enter Nicaragua? What visa do I need to travel to or visit Nicaragua? What are the visa requirements for Nicaragua? How long can I stay in Nicaragua on e-visa?

A lot of Haitian people are now asking these questions for themselves. As the world becomes smaller with modern technology and easier travel options, it’s natural to want to see other parts of the world.

However, if you want to visit another country and aren’t aware of its visa requirements, it can be a bit difficult.

Luckily, we’ll be discussing the requirements for visas and other information regarding traveling to Nicaragua with Haitian passport.

Always be prepared prior to travel so that nothing goes wrong. To aid you in this, we’ve created this article which contains some helpful information on what to do before traveling to Nicaragua.

We will discuss what type of visa you need to enter or visit Nicaragua, as well as how long you can stay in Nicaragua if your visa is approved.

This article will provide everything you need to know about getting a visa application to travel to Nicaragua as a citizen from Haiti.

Read Also About: New-Zealand

Read Also About: Netherlands

About Nicaragua

Nicaragua is among the most stunning countries in the world; it is renowned for its diverse culture and rich heritage. It offers numerous opportunities for tourists to explore its culture and history.

If you’re in search of the perfect place to spend your vacation or just want to explore somewhere new, then Nicaragua is a fantastic option!

One method to understand what makes this country unique is to go to one the many tourist destinations!

There are many factors that make this country so special. It has a rich history that can be seen throughout many areas and landmarks. In addition, it is home to a diverse community of people from all over the world living there.

If you are looking to travel there in the near future be sure to check out some of these attractions, so you do not be missing any thing!

Top place to see in Nicaragua

Nicaragua is a country in Central America. It is known for its natural beauty and friendly people. However, it is not as popular as other countries in the region. Nicaragua has a tropical climate with an average temperature of about 78 degrees Fahrenheit (26 degrees Celsius). The best time to visit it would be from November to March when the weather is warm and dry.

Read Also About: Nepal

Read Also About: Nauru

Visa Requirements for Visiting Nicaragua With Haitian Passport:

In this article we will go over the visa requirement for Nicaragua. However, prior to getting your heart set on visiting Nicaragua be aware that there are many different types of visas, each with its own conditions.

When you are contemplating a trip to Nicaragua there are numerous aspects to take into consideration, such as the visa requirements for entering the country. While no two countries have exactly the same process however, each has specific requirements to obtain visas. This can assist you in deciding whether your trip is worth the cost and effort.

If you’re planning to travel to a foreign country, the first thing you should be sure of is that you have all the proper documentation to be able to apply for an entry visa.

If you want to get a visa there are several documents that you must have, such as proof of employment or income. The requirements will differ based on which type of visa you are seeking, therefore make sure to confirm before making any plans!

Visa is required to enter this country. You must apply for a visa before traveling to this country. There are various types of visas one can apply for, such as student visas, working visas, and touristic visas, which all fall into this category. Nevertheless, remember that every category has a distinguished variety of requirements. Some visas are hard to get, whereas others are granted very easily. The same is why one needs to conduct thorough research before selecting the type of Visa they wish to obtain. To acquire it, you must visit the embassy of the country you wish to travel to. You must submit all your legal documents and follow the guided procedure. Most of these visas are granted on a referral basis as well. However, it all depends upon the country. Please check with the embassy of the country for the requirements and the application process.

In the end, it’s important to understand the process by which Nicaragua visas operate and how they affect your travel plans. Although this article provides a brief overview of the procedure, you should contact your local consulate , or embassy for more information about your particular situation.

Last Updated: 16/09/2022

Read Also About: Niger

Read Also About: Nigeria

Read Also About: North-Korea

Read Also About: North-Macedonia

Home » Travel Nicaragua, Book Hotels in Nicaragua, Flights to Nicaragua » Nicaragua Visa, Passport Information, Travel Info

Nicaragua Visa, Passport Information, Travel Info

A Visa is required by citizens of the following countries: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cameroon, China (PR), Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Ghana, Haiti, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Korea (Rep), Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mozambique, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Palestine National Authority, Peru, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Ukraine, Vietnam and Yemen.

Other nationals can simply obtain a ‘Tourist Card’ on arrival in Nicaragua for approximately US$10 for stays of up to one month.

What documents are required? A passport valid for 6 months beyond the date of arrival is required by all visitors to Nicaragua. You will need:

Valid passport and photocopy of passport Application form (completed) Two passport photos Required Fee Return or onward flight ticket

How long will a visa application take? Approximately 4 to 6 weeks is required for completion and return of your visa documents.

How long is it valid? Standard visa is valid for one month. Extensions can be arranged.

back to Travel

Related Page

Real estate.

While still in the early stages of shrugging off the image of a rough-and-tumble, politically troubled country, Nicaragua is fast developing as a very sought after real estate market. When you think of the immense beauty of this country and combine it with prime real estate and super low prices, it’s easy to understand why so many people are leaping at the opportunity to invest in Nicaragua ...

Expatriates

While many people never even dream of leaving the town they were born in, there are others who are constantly searching for newer and better horizons. Some of these individuals eventually leave their homeland and take up residency in a foreign country – content to settle for a different way of life that they somehow deem to be of far more value than what they once had. Though to many their ...

U.S. flag

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure Website

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( A locked padlock ) or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

  • Create Account

Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans

  Español | Kreyòl Ayisyen |

ALERT: You are likely eligible to apply for an employment authorization document (EAD) to legally work in the United States if:

  • You were recently paroled into the United States and that parole remains valid; or
  • You have applied for asylum and that application has been pending for at least 150 days.

If you have not already started the EAD application process, you can begin here by creating a USCIS account online and filing Form-I-765 . We will mail your work permit to the address you provided in your application if your application is approved. If necessary, you can file a paper application for Form I-765 instead.

ALERT:  Updated Review Process for the Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans

The U.S. government may grant advance travel authorization to up to 30,000 noncitizens each month to seek parole on a case-by-case basis under the processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans. Due to high interest in these processes, we are updating the review process effective May 17, 2023. Under the new review process, we will randomly select about half of the monthly total of Forms I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support, regardless of filing date, from the entire pending workload to review. We will review the other half of the monthly total of Forms I-134A based on when the case was submitted under the first-in, first-out method, which prioritizes the oldest Forms I-134A for review. This is intended to maintain a meaningful and equitable opportunity for all beneficiaries of a Form I-134A to move forward through the process and seek advance travel authorization. For more information, see our web alert .

ALERT:  Access to the processes is free. Neither the U.S.-based supporter nor the beneficiary is required to pay the U.S. government a fee to file the Form I-134A, be considered for travel authorization, or parole. Beware of any scams or potential exploitation by anyone who asks for money associated with participation in this process.

DHS has announced processes through which nationals of Cuba, Haiti, Nicaragua, and Venezuela, and their immediate family members, may request to come to the United States in a safe and orderly way. Qualified beneficiaries who are outside the United States and lack U.S. entry documents may be considered, on a case-by-case basis, for advanced authorization to travel and a temporary period of parole for up to two years for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit. To participate, eligible beneficiaries must:

  • Have a supporter in the United States;
  • Undergo and clear robust security vetting;
  • Meet other eligibility criteria; and
  • Warrant a favorable exercise of discretion.

Individuals participating in these processes must have a supporter in the United States who agrees to provide them with financial support for the duration of their parole in the United States. The first step in the process is for the U.S.-based supporter to file a  Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support , with USCIS for each beneficiary they seek to support, including minor children. The U.S. government will then review the supporter information provided in the Form I-134A to ensure that they are able to financially support the beneficiaries they are agreeing to support.

See below for additional information on the processes and country specific eligibility requirements. Additional information is also available on our Frequently Asked Questions About the Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans page.

Who May be Considered for Advance Travel Authorization

In order to be eligible to request and ultimately be considered for an advance authorization to travel to the United States to seek parole under these processes, beneficiaries must:

  • Be outside the United States;
  • Be a national of Cuba, Haiti, Nicaragua, or Venezuela; or be an immediate family member (spouse, common-law partner, and/or unmarried child under the age of 21) who is traveling with an eligible Cuban, Haitian, Nicaraguan, or Venezuelan;
  • Have a U.S.-based supporter who filed a Form I-134A on their behalf that USCIS has vetted and confirmed;
  • Possess an unexpired passport valid for international travel;

Provide for their own commercial travel to an air U.S. port of entry and final U.S. destination;

Undergo and pass required national security and public safety vetting;

  • Comply with all additional requirements, including vaccination requirements and other public health guidelines; and
  • Demonstrate that a grant of parole is warranted based on significant public benefit or urgent humanitarian reasons, and that a favorable exercise of discretion is otherwise merited.

An individual is ineligible to be considered for parole under these processes if that person is a dual national or permanent resident of, or holds refugee status in, another country, unless DHS operates a similar parole process for the country’s nationals. This requirement does not apply to immediate family members (spouse, common-law partner, or unmarried child under the age of 21) of an eligible national of Cuba, Haiti, Nicaragua, or Venezuela with whom they are traveling.

In addition, a potential beneficiary is ineligible for advance authorization to travel to the United States as well as parole under these processes if that person:

  • Fails to pass national security and public safety vetting or is otherwise deemed not to merit a favorable exercise of discretion;
  • Has been ordered removed from the United States within the prior five years or is subject to a bar to admissibility based on a prior removal order;
  • Has crossed irregularly into the United States, between the ports of entry, after the date the process was announced (for Venezuelans, after Oct. 19, 2022; for Cubans, Haitians, and Nicaraguans, after Jan. 9, 2023), except individuals permitted a single instance of voluntary departure pursuant to INA § 240B, 8 U.S.C. § 1229c or withdrawal of their application for admission pursuant to INA § 235(a)(4), 8 U.S.C. § 1225(a)(4) will remain eligible;
  • Has irregularly crossed the Mexican or Panamanian border after the date the process was announced (for Venezuelans, after Oct. 19, 2022; for Cubans, Haitians, and Nicaraguans, after Jan. 9, 2023);
  • Is Cuban or Haitian and has been interdicted at sea after April 27, 2023; or
  • Is under 18 and not traveling through this process accompanied by a parent or legal guardian.

Important Note about Venezuelan Passports

The beneficiary must have a valid, unexpired passport. Certified extensions of passport validity serve to meet this requirement. If a beneficiary's passport validity has been extended, the expiration date of the extension should be reflected as the passport expiration date. U.S. Customs and Border Patrol(CBP) will not authorize travel if the beneficiary's passport or extension is expired.

Consistent with the National Assembly decree of May 21, 2019, certain expired Venezuelan passports remain valid. A Venezuelan passport:

  • Issued before June 7, 2019 (even if expired before this date), without a passport extension ("prórroga"), is considered valid and unexpired for five years beyond the expiration date printed in the passport.
  • Issued before June 7, 2019 (even if expired before this date), with a "prórroga" issued before June 7, 2019, is considered valid and unexpired for five years beyond the expiration date of the “prórroga.”
  • Issued before June 7, 2019 (even if expired before this date), with a "prórroga" issued on or after June 7, 2019, is considered valid and unexpired through the expiration date of the “prórroga” or for five years beyond the expiration date printed in the passport, whichever is later.
  • Issued on or after June 7, 2019, without a “prórroga” is not considered valid beyond the expiration date printed in the passport.
  • Issued on or after June 7, 2019, with a “prórroga" issued on or after June 7, 2019, is considered valid and unexpired through the expiration date of the “prórroga.”

Children under the age of 18 arriving without their parent or legal guardian are not eligible for advance authorization to travel or consideration for parole under the processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans.  If a child under age 18 arrives at a U.S. port of entry and is not traveling with their parent or legal guardian, they may be placed in the custody of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), as required by law under the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008. For more information, please visit the  HHS Unaccompanied Children webpage . 

Children under age 18 who are not traveling with a parent or legal guardian, but who are coming to the United States to meet a parent or legal guardian, may instead seek parole through the standard Form I-131 parole process. In the standard Form I-131 parole process, children under age 18 who travel without a parent or legal guardian will need, among other evidence, written permission from all adults with legal custody of the child (that is, their parents or legal guardians) to travel to the United States. 

Additional evidence submitted with the Form I-131 should include: 

The duration of their stay in the United States; and  

Evidence of relationship between the child under age 18 and the parent or legal guardian that the child is traveling to reunite with in the United States (see Step 5, below).  

If the legal guardian is providing the written permission, the requestor must include proof of legal guardianship issued by the appropriate government authority. In addition, the application should include a statement about the relationship of the child to the person filing the Form I-131, and whether they intend to provide care and custody of the child in the United States or reunite the child with a parent or legal guardian in the United States. For more information, please see our  Guidance on Evidence for Certain Types of Humanitarian or Significant Public Benefit Parole  page, which has information about the requirements for requesting parole for children. 

You may request a fee waiver when submitting a Form I-131 for a child as described in the above paragraph. For more information on how to request a fee waiver, please see the  Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver , webpage. 

Pathway for Children Under Age 18 Outside the United States Who Have Parents or Legal Guardians in the United States 

If a child’s parents or legal guardians have lawful status in the United States, are parolees (including a parolee under the processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans), or are beneficiaries of deferred action or Deferred Enforced Departure (DED), and the parents or legal guardians have documentation or authorization to reenter the United States after returning from a trip outside the United States, they may be eligible to travel outside the United States to accompany their child to the United States. The child must otherwise be eligible for consideration for parole under the processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, or Venezuelans.  

To request consideration under the processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, or Venezuelans, a supporter must submit a Form I-134A on behalf of the child under age 18 seeking to reunite with their parent or legal guardian in the United States. The parent or legal guardian of the child may file Form I-134A on the child’s behalf if the parent or legal guardian has lawful status in the United States, is a parolee, or is a beneficiary of deferred action or DED. However, the U.S.-based supporter does not need to be related to the beneficiary for whom they have filed Form I-134A. 

After we have confirmed the Form I-134A, the supporter should follow these steps: 

Step 1: Log in to their online account. 

Step 2: From the top of the webpage, select the My Account drop-down menu and select Inbox.  

Step 3: Click on the New Message button. 

Step 4: For the subject, select “Other” from the drop-down menu, and for the case receipt number, select the receipt number for Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support.  

Step 5: In the message field, write “CHNV Child Reunification” and state that they are contacting USCIS on behalf of a child under age 18 who is eligible for the processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, or Venezuelans, and who has a parent or legal guardian who can depart and reenter the United States to accompany their child so the child can use the processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, or Venezuelans. In addition, the supporter should upload in their online account this supporting documentation:   

Evidence of the parental relationship or legal guardianship of the child. (Evidence may include a birth certificate for the child and identity documents for the parent or legal guardian. Generally, evidence of legal guardianship requires a legal or administrative process involving the courts or other recognized government entity. A power of attorney or written or notarized statement is not a formally recognized arrangement.) 

Evidence that the parent or legal guardian has documentation or authorization to reenter the United States. This documentation may include proof of U.S. citizenship, a Green Card, or an Advance Parole Document (Application for Travel Document, Form I-131). 

A signed statement affirming that the parent or legal guardian will accompany the child to the United States and provide care and physical custody of that child in the United States.  

U.S.-based supporters will initiate an online request on behalf of a named beneficiary, by submitting a Form I-134A to USCIS for each beneficiary, including minor children. Supporters can be individuals filing independently, filing with other individuals, or filing on behalf of organizations, businesses, or other entities. There is no fee required to file Form I-134A. The supporter will be vetted by the U.S. government to protect against exploitation and abuse and to ensure that they are able to financially support the beneficiary they are agreeing to support.

To serve as a supporter, an individual or individual representing an entity must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen, national, or lawful permanent resident; hold a lawful status in the United States such as Temporary Protected Status or asylum; or be a parolee or recipient of deferred action or Deferred Enforced Departure; 
  • Pass security and background vetting, including for public safety, national security, human trafficking, and exploitation concerns; and
  • Demonstrate sufficient financial resources to receive, maintain, and support the individual(s) they are agreeing to support for the duration of their parole period.

Supporters who file Form I-134A on behalf of a beneficiary under these processes must be willing and able to receive, maintain, and support the beneficiary listed in Form I-134A for the duration of their parole. Examples of the types of support for beneficiaries that supporters should keep in mind when considering their ability to meet this commitment include:

  • Receiving the beneficiary upon arrival in the United States and transporting them to initial housing;
  • Ensuring that the beneficiary has safe and appropriate housing for the duration of their parole and initial basic necessities;
  • As appropriate, helping the beneficiary complete necessary paperwork such as for employment authorization, for a Social Security card, and for services for which they may be eligible;
  • Ensuring that the beneficiary’s health care and medical needs are met for the duration of the parole; and
  • As appropriate, assisting the beneficiary with accessing education, learning English, securing employment, and enrolling children in school.

Supporters must include the name of the beneficiary on Form I-134A. Supporters may not file a Form I-134A on behalf of an unnamed beneficiary. A supporter may agree to support more than one beneficiary, such as for different members of a family group, but must file a separate Form I-134A for each beneficiary.

Supporters must file a separate Form I-134A for each beneficiary, even minor children.  Multiple supporters may join together to support a beneficiary. In this case, a supporter should file a Form I-134A and in the filing include supplementary evidence demonstrating the identity of, and resources to be provided by, the additional supporters and attach a statement explaining the intent to share responsibility to support the beneficiary. These supporters’ ability to support a beneficiary will be assessed collectively.

Organizations, businesses, and other entities can play a critical role in providing support for beneficiaries arriving through this process. Although an individual is required to file and sign the Form I-134A, they can do so in association with or on behalf of an organization, business, or other entity that will provide some or all of the necessary support to the beneficiary. Individual supporters filing with or on behalf of an organization, business, or other entity should submit evidence of the entity’s commitment to support the beneficiary when they file the Form I-134A. This can be demonstrated through a letter of commitment or other documentation from an officer or other credible representative of the organization, business, or other entity describing the monetary or other types of support (such as housing, basic necessities, transportation, etc.) the entity will be providing to the specific beneficiary. Individuals who are filing in association with an organization, business, or other entity do not need to submit their personal financial information, if the level of support demonstrated by the entity is sufficient to support the beneficiary.

Organizations outside of the government may be able to help potential supporters and beneficiaries to prepare for this process. Two organizations that specialize in providing the public with information about providing welcome to newcomers and resources to support participation in these processes are listed below.

  • Welcome.us  provides information on welcoming and supporting newcomer populations.
  • Community Sponsorship Hub has established the Sponsor Circle Program , which can provide resources and ongoing guidance to supporters.

This information is provided for informational purposes only. DHS does not endorse these entities. Using these entities in lieu of any other entity does not give any parolee preferential treatment in the adjudication of their application.

Beneficiaries cannot directly apply for these processes. A supporter in the United States must first complete and file Form I-134A with USCIS on behalf of a beneficiary and include information about them and contact details, such as an email address. If we deem the Form I-134A sufficient, in our discretion, we will send the beneficiary information about the next step in the process to be considered for authorization to travel to the United States and parole consideration at an airport of entry.

Once beneficiaries receive their travel authorization, they should arrange to fly directly to their final destination in the United States. Upon arrival at the interior port of entry, individuals will be inspected by CBP and required to submit additional information, to include fingerprints, for further biometric vetting, and then be considered for a discretionary grant of parole. Those who attempt to enter the U.S. at land ports of entry will not be considered for parole through this process and will generally be denied entry.

The key steps in the processes include:

Step 1: Financial Support

  • A U.S.-based supporter will submit a Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support, with USCIS through the online myUSCIS web portal to initiate the process. The Form I-134A identifies and collects information on both the supporter and the beneficiary. The supporter must submit a separate Form I-134A for each beneficiary they are seeking to support, including immediate family members and minor children.
  • We will then vet the supporter to ensure that they are able to financially support the individual they are agreeing to support and to protect against exploitation and abuse. USCIS, in our discretion, must vet and confirm supporters before they move forward in the process.

Step 2: Submit Biographic Information

  • If we confirm a supporter, the listed beneficiary will receive an email from us with instructions on how to create a USCIS online account and other next steps. The beneficiary must confirm their biographic information in myUSCIS and attest to meeting the eligibility requirements.
  • As part of confirming eligibility in their online account, individuals who seek authorization to travel to the United States must confirm that they meet public health requirements, including certain vaccination requirements.

Step 3: Submit Request in CBP One Mobile Application

  • After confirming biographic information in their online account and completing required eligibility attestations, the beneficiary will receive instructions through myUSCIS on how to access the  CBP One mobile application (PDF, 771.55 KB) . The beneficiary must enter their biographic information into CBP One and provide a photo.

Step 4: Advance Travel Authorization to the United States

  • After completing Step 3, the beneficiary will receive a notice in their online account confirming whether CBP will, in its discretion, provide them with advance authorization to travel to the United States to seek a discretionary grant of parole on a case-by-case basis.
  • If approved, this authorization is valid for 90 days. Beneficiaries are responsible for securing their own travel via air to the United States. Approval of advance authorization to travel does not guarantee entry or parole into the United States at a U.S. port of entry. Parole is a discretionary determination made by CBP at the port of entry, based on a finding that parole is warranted due to urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit.

Step 5: Seeking Parole at the Port of Entry

  • When a beneficiary arrives a port of entry, CBP will inspect them and consider them for a grant of discretionary parole on a case-by-case basis.
  • As part of the inspection, beneficiaries will undergo additional screening and vetting, to include additional fingerprint biometric vetting consistent with the CBP inspection process. Individuals who are determined to pose a national security or public safety threat, or otherwise not warrant parole as a matter of discretion upon inspection, will be processed under an appropriate processing pathway and may be referred to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

Step 6: Parole

  • Individuals granted parole under these processes generally will be paroled into the United States for a period of up to two years, subject to applicable health and vetting requirements, and will be eligible to apply for employment authorization under existing regulations.
  • Individuals granted parole may request work authorization from USCIS by filing a  Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization , either online or via mail.

After the supporter files the Form I-134A with USCIS, we will review the form and supporting evidence to ensure that the supporter has sufficient financial resources to support the beneficiary for the duration of the parole period and conduct background checks on the supporter. We will determine whether the Form I-134A is sufficient, and we may request additional evidence to make our determination. If approved, beneficiaries will receive an email from USCIS with instructions on how to set up a USCIS online account and other next steps. Individuals should check their email, including spam and junk folders, for important messages from USCIS.

If the Form I-134A is Sufficient

If we confirm in our discretion that the Form I-134A is sufficient, the beneficiary will receive an email from USCIS with instructions on how to set up a USCIS online account and other next steps. The beneficiary must confirm their biographic information on myUSCIS and attest to completion of all requirements, including:

  • you are not a permanent resident or dual national of any country other than your country of nationality, and that you do not currently hold refugee status in any country, unless DHS operates a similar parole process for the country’s nationals; or
  • you are the spouse, common-law partner, or unmarried child under the age of 21 and traveling with an eligible national;
  • An  attestation  to certify understanding of the family relationship requirements for children under 18; and
  • An attestation that you have completed vaccine requirements or are eligible for an exception to vaccine requirements for measles, polio, and the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine  approved or authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)  or  Emergency Use Listed (EUL) by the World Health Organization (WHO) .

After arriving in the United States, the beneficiary must attest to receiving a medical screening for tuberculosis, including an Interferon-Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) test, within 90 days.

Find more information on vaccine requirements on the  preview of the vaccine attestation page  .

If the Form I-134A is Insufficient

If we are unable to confirm the Form I-134A is sufficient, that decision is final. The beneficiary will receive an email from USCIS notifying them that we determined the Form I-134A filed on their behalf was insufficient. We will not consider the beneficiary for parole under this parole process based on the insufficient Form I-134A. However, the supporter may file a new Form I-134A on behalf of the same or another beneficiary, or a different supporter may file a Form I-134A on behalf of the beneficiary.

Authorization to Travel to the United States

Once the beneficiary has confirmed their biographic information and attested to completing all other requirements, we will process their case further. Beneficiaries will receive an email instructing them to check their online account in myUSCIS for the result of their authorization to travel. This authorization is valid for 90 days.

If the beneficiary has been authorized to travel to the United States, they must arrange and fund their own travel. Beneficiaries must arrange to fly to the United States by air directly to an interior port of entry and their final destination.

Applying for Employment Authorization

After you are paroled into the United States, you are eligible to apply for discretionary employment authorization from USCIS. To apply for an Employment Authorization Document (EAD), you must submit  Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization , using the (c)(11) category code with the required fee, or apply for a fee waiver.

To file Form I-765 online, eligible applicants will access their USCIS online account at  my.uscis.gov .

You can find the filing fee for Form I-765 by visiting our Fee Schedule page. 

Applicants who are requesting a waiver of the Form I-765 filing fee must submit Form I-765 by mail with Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver .

Obtaining a Social Security Number and Card

We encourage you to apply for a Social Security number (SSN) using  Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization , and following the form instructions. If you request an SSN in Part 2 (Items 13.a-17.b) of your Form I-765, and we approve your Form I-765, we will electronically transmit that data to the Social Security Administration (SSA), and SSA will assign you an SSN and issue you a Social Security card. SSA will mail your Social Security card directly to the address you provide on Form I-765. SSNs generally are assigned to people who are authorized to work in the United States. SSNs are used to report your wages to the government and to determine your eligibility for Social Security benefits.

If you do not request an SSN on your Form I-765, you can apply for an SSN after you receive your EAD from USCIS using the instructions on SSA’s  Social Security Number and Card  webpage.

Address Updates

If you are residing in the United States longer than 30 days, you must report your physical address in the United States. If your address changes after you enter the United States, you must notify us within 10 days of the change, by either:

  • Using our  online change of address form ; or
  • Through your existing USCIS online account (if you have an account). For more information on how to create an online account, visit the  How to Create a USCIS Online Account .

Changing your address online will update the address on file with USCIS for each pending application, petition, or request for which you provide a receipt number when filling out the Online Change of Address form . It is important to include the receipt number for any cases pending with USCIS in your address change request, so that we can update the address associated with those cases. We will mail secure documents to the address on file. You can find the receipt number on the receipt notice (Form I-797C, Notice of Action) that we issued after you filed your application, petition, or request. We send receipt notices to the address listed on the application, petition, or request.

Terminating Your Parole

If you have already been paroled into the United States, your parole will automatically be terminated if:

  • You depart the United States (without an Advance Parole Document before traveling outside the United States); or
  • Your parole period expires.

DHS may also decide to terminate your parole at its discretion for other reasons, such as violating any laws of the United States. We expect you will leave the country when your parole expires. If you stay in the United States after your parole expires, officials who encounter you may refer you to ICE for immigration proceedings.

Leaving the United States

If we grant you travel authorization, you may present it only once for travel to the United States to seek parole at the U.S. port of entry. After you are paroled into the United States, if you want to leave the United States and then return as a parolee, you must request an Advance Parole Document by filing Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, before traveling outside the United States. If you leave the United States without getting an Advance Parole Document, your parole will be terminated when you depart. For information on how to apply for an Advance Parole Document while you are in the United States, please see the  Form I-131 page.

The best way to contact us depends on the type of inquiry.

Case Status Inquiries: You can check the status of your Form I-134A in your USCIS online account or in Case Status Online . Please note that the USCIS Contact Center can only provide the same information about the status of your case that is available in your USCIS online account.

Corrections: You can generally correct a submitted Form I-134A in your USCIS online account or by sending a secure message from your USCIS online account. See the “Correcting a Submitted Form I-134A” section on the Frequently Asked Questions about the Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans page for more information.

Other Inquiries: For other inquiries, see the “Contacting USCIS About Form I-134A” section on the Frequently Asked Questions about the Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans page.

Please note that beneficiaries are not obligated to repay, reimburse, work for, serve, marry, or otherwise compensate their supporter in exchange for filing Form I-134A on their behalf or for providing financial support while they are in the United States.

Access to these processes is free. Neither the supporter nor the beneficiary is required to pay the U.S. government a fee for the Form I-134A. Beware of any scams or potential exploitation by anyone who asks for money associated with the Form I-134A or participation in these processes. DHS recommends the following actions to avoid intimidating situations:

  • Avoid individuals who promise to “get you to the United States quickly” if you pay an exorbitant sum of money.
  • Keep your passport and other identity documents in your possession at all times.
  • If you are concerned that the individual who filed Form I-134A on your behalf is not a legitimate organization or entity or legal representative, see the  Scams, Fraud, and Misconduct  webpage.

Call the 24-hour National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or report an emergency to law enforcement by calling 911. Trafficking victims, whether or not U.S. citizens, are eligible for services and immigration assistance.

There are many forms of abuse and exploitation, including domestic violence, forced marriage, and human trafficking. In the United States, there are laws that may help you avoid or escape an abusive situation.

  • Domestic Violence  is a pattern of behavior in a relationship that is used to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner, parent, or child. Domestic abuse can involve physical, sexual, emotional, financial, or psychological abuse or threats.
  • Forced marriage  is a marriage that takes place without the consent of one or both people in the marriage. Consent means that you have given your full, free, and informed agreement to marry your intended spouse and to the timing of the marriage. Forced marriage may occur when family members or others use physical or emotional abuse, threats, or deception to force you to marry without your consent. For additional information on forced marriage, please visit the  Forced Marriage  webpage.
  • Human Trafficking  involves exploiting someone to compel a commercial sex act or forced labor. Generally, this exploitation must involve force, fraud, or coercion to be considered human trafficking. However, if someone under 18 years old is induced to perform a commercial sex act, that is considered human trafficking even if there is no force, fraud, or coercion.

If you have experienced or fear forced marriage, domestic violence, human trafficking, or other abuse, please contact the resources below to receive free help in your language:

  • National Domestic Violence Hotline:  800-799-7233, 800-787-3224 (TTY),  www.ndvh.org
  • National Center for Missing and Exploited Children:  800-843-5678,  www.missingkids.com
  • The National Center for Victims of Crime:  800-394-2255, 800-211-7996 (TTY),  www.victimsofcrime.org
  • National Human Trafficking Hotline:  888-373-7888, Text: 233733

For more information and additional resources related to gender-based violence, see the DHS Gender-Based Violence Pamphlets .

  • We do not want you to become the victim of an immigration scam. If you need legal advice on immigration matters, make sure the person helping you is authorized to give legal advice. Only an attorney or accredited representative working for a Department of Justice recognized organization can give you legal advice. Visit the Avoid Scams page for information and resources.

Some common scams to be aware of include:

  • Government impersonators:  Look out for individuals who pose as USCIS officials. USCIS will only contact you through official government channels and will not contact you through your personal social media accounts (such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.).
  • Misleading offers of support: Look out for individuals who attempt to contact you online or through your social media accounts to offer to be your supporter or connect you to a supporter in exchange for a fee or other form of compensation. Similarly, look out for individuals seeking biographic information from you, such as your passport number or date of birth, through your social media accounts, to offer to support you for parole. Supporters should be able to provide financial support to beneficiaries for up to a 2-year period of parole. Beneficiaries are not obligated to repay, reimburse, work for, serve, marry, or otherwise compensate their supporter in exchange for the potential supporter submitting Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support, on their behalf or for providing financial support while they are in the United States. Find more information on potential exploitation and abuse in the Understand Your Rights (PDF) guide.
  • Scam Websites: Some websites claim to be affiliated with USCIS and offer step-by-step guidance on completing a USCIS application or petition. Make sure your information is from uscis.gov, dhs.gov, or is affiliated with uscis.gov. Make sure the website address ends with .gov.
  • Payments by Phone or Email: We will never ask you to transfer money to an individual. We do not accept Western Union, MoneyGram, PayPal, or gift cards as payment for immigration fees. In addition, we will never ask you to pay fees to a person on the phone or by email.
  • Notarios Públicos and unauthorized practitioners of immigration law: In the United States, a notario público is not authorized to provide you with any legal services related to immigration benefits. Only an attorney or an accredited representative working for a Department of Justice (DOJ)-recognized organization can give you legal advice. For more information about finding legal services , visit our website.
  • Employment Resources for Parolees in the United States
  • Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support
  • Form I-134A, Online Request to be a Supporter and Declaration of Financial Support (PDF, 569.98 KB)
  • Frequently Asked Questions About the Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans
  • Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans Flyer (PDF, 401.27 KB)
  • Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans Flyer (PDF, 335.05 KB) (Spanish)
  • Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans Flyer (PDF, 340.46 KB) (Haitian-Creole)

Find deals for any season

From cozy bed & breakfasts to luxury hotels

Fly away to your dream vacation

Get instant discounts

Get inspiration for your next trip more, 5 of the best hotels in los angeles.

From Hollywood to Beverly Hills discover 5 of the best hotels in Los Angeles for your stay

The 6 best Orlando hotels for families

Destinations Bookers love

Stay in the know.

Error: Please enter a valid email address.

Error: Oops! An error has occurred.

Thanks! We've sent you an email so you can confirm your subscription

List your property

  • Mobile version
  • Your account
  • Make changes online to your booking
  • Customer Service Help
  • Booking.com for Business
  • Places of interest
  • Guest Houses
  • Unique places to stay
  • All destinations
  • All flight destinations
  • All car rental locations
  • All vacation destinations
  • Discover monthly stays
  • Travel articles
  • Seasonal and holiday deals
  • Traveller Review Awards
  • Flight finder
  • Restaurant reservations
  • Booking.com for Travel Agents
  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) FAQs
  • About Booking.com
  • Partner help
  • Sustainability
  • Press Center
  • Safety Resource Center
  • Investor relations
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Partner dispute
  • How We Work
  • Privacy & cookie statement
  • MSA statement
  • Corporate contact
  • Content guidelines and reporting

Booking.com is part of Booking Holdings Inc., the world leader in online travel and related services.

Verified reviews from real guests.

We have more than 70 million property reviews, all from real, verified guests .

How does it work?

It starts with a booking.

The only way to leave a review is to first make a booking. That's how we know our reviews come from real guests who have stayed at the property.

Followed by a trip

When guests stay at the property, they check out how quiet the room is, how friendly the staff is, and more.

And finally, a review

After their trip, guests tell us about their stay. We check for naughty words and verify the authenticity of all guest reviews before adding them to our site.

If you booked through us and want to leave a review, please sign in first.

Check-in date

Check-out date

visit nicaragua from haiti

  • Election 2024
  • Entertainment
  • Newsletters
  • Photography
  • Personal Finance
  • AP Investigations
  • AP Buyline Personal Finance
  • AP Buyline Shopping
  • Press Releases
  • Israel-Hamas War
  • Russia-Ukraine War
  • Global elections
  • Asia Pacific
  • Latin America
  • Middle East
  • Election Results
  • Delegate Tracker
  • AP & Elections
  • Auto Racing
  • 2024 Paris Olympic Games
  • Movie reviews
  • Book reviews
  • Personal finance
  • Financial Markets
  • Business Highlights
  • Financial wellness
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Social Media

Nicaragua is ‘weaponizing’ US-bound migrants as Haitians pour in on charter flights, observers say

FILE - Haitian migrants who hope to apply for asylum in the U.S. wait to register their names on a list made by a religious organization in Reynosa, Mexico, Dec. 21, 2022, on the other side of the border with McAllen, Texas. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano, File)

FILE - Haitian migrants who hope to apply for asylum in the U.S. wait to register their names on a list made by a religious organization in Reynosa, Mexico, Dec. 21, 2022, on the other side of the border with McAllen, Texas. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano, File)

FILE - Haitian migrants wade across the Tuquesa river after trekking through the Darien Gap in Bajo Chiquito, Panama, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2023. Dozens of charter flights believed to be carrying migrants fleeing crisis-stricken Haiti have touched down in recent days in Nicaragua, the latest in a historic crush of migration to the U.S. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco, File)

  • Copy Link copied

MEXICO CITY (AP) — More than 260 charter flights believed to be carrying migrants from Haiti have touched down in Nicaragua in recent months, according to flight data and experts in the region, adding to a historic crush of migration by people hoping to reach the U.S.

The flow of migrants has left the Biden administration and Latin American leaders scrambling for solutions, and experts say it’s also being used as leverage by governments like Nicaragua’s to get concessions from the U.S. amid tightening sanctions.

“The Ortega government knows they have few important policy tools at hand to confront the United States, ... so they have armed migration as a way to attack,” said Manuel Orozco, director of the migration, remittances and development program at the Inter-American Dialogue. “This is definitely a concrete example of weaponizing migration as a foreign policy.”

Nicaragua has long been used as a migratory springboard for people fleeing struggling Caribbean nations like Cuba and Haiti as well as countries as far away as Mauritania in Africa, because it is one of the few countries that doesn’t require visas for many of them to enter.

Egyptian shipwreck survivors enter a police station to be processed following their release from prison, in the town of Nafplio, about 136 kilometers (85 miles) southwest of Athens, Greece, Wednesday, May 22, 2024. A Greek court Monday dismissed a case against nine Egyptian defendants accused of causing a shipwreck off the southern coast of Greece last June that killed several hundred migrants travelling from Libya to Italy. The suspects had spent 11 months in pre-trial prison detention. (AP Photo/Derek Gatopoulos)

Such flights from Cuba were already gaining steam late last year amid a historic exodus from the island. In August, Orozco said the Nicaraguan government allowed charter airlines to carry out the flights.

The journeys are not on official air routes, but flight tracking data that has been analyzed by Orozco and The Associated Press shows that 268 of the charter flights went from Haiti to Nicaragua since the beginning of August.

The charter airlines have flown as many as 31,000 people out of Haiti, which would represent nearly 60% of the Haitians arriving to the U.S. border, Orozco’s data shows. Over the same period, some 172 flights have carried 17,000 people from Cuba to Nicaragua.

The AP spoke to three Haitian migrants who were aboard the charter flights, who said they doled out thousands of dollars to leave the poorest country in the hemisphere in hopes of reaching the United States. Orozco said most tickets range between $3,000 and $5,000 a seat.

Things came to a head this weekend, when local media reported that in 48 hours, 27 charter flights from Haiti had landed in Nicaragua. The mounting number of flights comes at a strategic moment for Ortega’s government, said Enrique Martínez, a spokesperson for the dissident group Platform for Democratic Unity.

As Venezuelans make up a big portion of those arriving to the U.S. border, the Biden administration recently negotiated a loosening of sanctions on Venezuela’s government – which have deepened the country’s economic crisis – in exchange for promises of carrying out democratic elections.

Ortega may be hoping for a similar outcome, Martínez said.

The U.S. government and European nations have ratcheted up sanctions on members of Ortega’s family and administration in recent years as he has grown more repressive. His government has driven hundreds of thousands of Nicaraguans to flee abroad and shut down thousands of non-governmental groups and universities in an effort to stifle dissent.

“Ortega is going to use this migration issue to say to the United States that we’re the ones in control,” Martinez said. “ And if they want to stop this, they’re going to have to negotiate.”

Ortega’s government did not respond to an emailed request for comment on the charter flights and allegations they were being used as leverage. Aviation authorities in Haiti did not respond to a request for more information.

Stéphanie Armand, a spokesperson for Sunrise Airways, which data show carried out at least 15 flights over the past week, said the company doesn’t sell tickets to Nicaragua, but rather is contracted by “third parties” to carry out the flights. She would not elaborate on who the third parties were.

Asked if the carrier’s services are being used by people smugglers to carry out migration to the U.S., Armand said the company checks passengers’ documents before boarding.

“As an airline and aircraft operator, we have no information about the intentions of passengers we are carrying,” Armand wrote. “If passengers comply with the country’s entry requirements and are admitted, it is for the authorities, not the airlines, to follow up on their status.”

Sky High Aviation Services, Air Century and Euroatlantic Airways, which also have made some of the charter flights, did not respond to the AP’s requests for comment.

A previous investigation by the AP unveiled a “shadow industry” of charter flights moving largely Haitians around the Americas. Migrant aid groups in other parts of Latin America accused airlines of being at “the end of a chain of powerful businesses making money from this circuit of Haitian migration.”

After boarding the pricey flight to Nicaragua, migrants have described to the AP walking out of the Managua airport and seeing crowds of smugglers waiting for migrants with photos and their names. From there, they are smuggled north.

The wave of flights come as the United States and other Central American nations have been left reeling as they struggle to cope with the numbers of people traversing their territories and arriving to the U.S.-Mexico border.

U.S. authorities said they stopped migrants more than 2 million times on the Mexico border in the 12 months of the government’s fiscal year that ended Sept. 20.

Last January, the Biden administration announced a plan it hoped would deter illegal immigration, saying it would accept 30,000 people per month from Haiti, Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela and authorize them to work in the U.S., as long as they come legally, have eligible sponsors and pass background checks. This “humanitarian parole” was paired with a warning that the U.S. would turn away any citizens from those countries who enter illegally.

In Tapachula, Mexico, near the Guatemalan border, tensions have risen along with the increase in the number of migrants passing through the city.

On Monday, saying they were frustrated by long lines and poor conditions, a group of largely Haitian migrants pushed into a temporary Mexican government asylum office in the town, and seven people were injured.

They were among about 3,000 migrants gathered outside the asylum office, among them Nilda Jean, a 28-year-old farmer from Haiti.

Jean said she paid $3,000 for her flight to Nicaragua and sacrificed a lot only to now find herself sleeping on the streets outside the asylum offices with the hope of reaching the U.S.

Mexico’s efforts to contain migrants in the south have frequently led to such displays of anger, because there are relatively few opportunities for work and housing is limited in Tapachula. Migrants already in debt for their journey are eager find work to begin paying it off.

The Biden administration has urged Central American nations and Mexico to help contain migration levels. While some countries in the region at least talk about trying , Nicaragua, no friend of the U.S., has not.

Martínez, at the Nicaraguan dissident group, said Ortega’s government views migration as a “business” injecting money into the country. While the Ortega administration has done little to facilitate travel by migrants, airlines pay taxes to the government and migrants and smugglers pay for hotels, food and transport.

“What (Ortega) is doing is taking advantage of things,” Martínez said, “but what it’s doing is making the path forward even more difficult for the countries searching for a solution.”

Associated Press writer Edgar H. Clemente in Tapachula, Mexico, contributed to this report.

Follow AP’s global migration coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/migration

visit nicaragua from haiti

The Haitian Times

The Haitian Times

Bridging the gap

Thousands of Haitians rush to Nicaragua, seeing it as “bridge” to US

' src=

CAP-HAITIEN — As soon as the glass door of the Cap-Haitien International Airport opened on a cloudy morning on Oct. 26, about 10 people shoved and pressed against each other to squeeze through. Along with a suitcase or backpack in one hand, some held a yellow folder high in the other hand so it wouldn’t get wrinkled. All of them, intent to travel to what one man called a “bridge” to the United States: Nicaragua.

The man, a 26 year-old mechanic from Gonaives , stood outside the airport with a gray sweater on top of head and sunglasses along with 50 or so others who registered for a trip to Nicaragua. Not wanting his family to know that he was traveling to Nicaragua, he asked to use a pseudonym, Marcellin Laguerre, for this article.

Register now and get 2 free articles every month.

Unlimited access to our daily content and archives .

Already have an account? Sign In .

Email me at [email protected] Onz Chery is a Haiti correspondent for The Haitian Times. Chery started his journalism career as a City College of New York student with The Campus. He later wrote for First Touch, local soccer leagues in New York and Elite Sports New York before joining The Haitian Times in 2019.

We've recently sent you an authentication link. Please, check your inbox!

Sign in with a password below, or sign in using your email .

Get a code sent to your email to sign in, or sign in using a password .

Enter the code you received via email to sign in, or sign in using a password .

Subscribe to our newsletters:

  • Haitian Times Newsletter and Daily Roundups
  • Haitian Excellence

Sign in with your email

Lost your password?

Try a different email

Send another code

Sign in with a password

Haitian Times' Subscription

Select an option below:

  • My View My View
  • Following Following
  • Saved Saved

US imposes sanctions on Nicaragua over repression, migrant smuggling

  • Medium Text

Sign up here.

Reporting by Steve Holland in Washington and Mica Rosenberg in New York; Additional reporting Daphne Psaledakis and Ted Hesson in Washington; Editing by Caitlin Webber, Jonathan Oatis and Nick Macfie

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles. New Tab , opens new tab

visit nicaragua from haiti

Thomson Reuters

Mica Rosenberg leads the immigration team at Reuters, reporting her own projects while helping edit and coordinate cross-border coverage. An investigation she published with colleagues into child labor in the United States – exposing migrant children manufacturing car parts and working in chicken processing in Alabama – was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and won a George Polk award among other honors. She was a foreign correspondent reporting from nearly a dozen countries across Latin America and also covered legal affairs and white-collar crime in New York. She completed a Knight Bagehot Fellowship in business journalism and earned a master’s from Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs. She is originally from New Mexico and is based in Brooklyn.

Inter-American Court of Human Rights holds hearings on landmark climate case in Manaus

World Chevron

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with Tula Region Governor Alexei Dyumin at a residence outside Moscow

Putin names ex-bodyguard Alexei Dyumin, a potential successor, to senior role

Russian President Vladimir Putin appointed Alexei Dyumin, his former bodyguard, as secretary of the advisory State Council on Wednesday, a step that fuelled speculation about Dyumin's presidential potential.

A balloon believed to have been sent by North Korea, carrying various objects including what appeared to be trash and excrement, is seen over a rice field at Cheorwon

Terex Global Supply Management Organization

Our team continues to seek suppliers that can help ensure that our products are manufactured at best-in-class cost, quality, delivery and service levels.

Terex Corporation logo

Suggested Topics

  • Sustainability

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I return an item?

To return an item, please visit our returns page and follow the instructions provided.

en

Already a user? Access all your apps and brands easily, from one place

New in here? Register now and get access to additional features

Supplier Registration

If you have previously registered, thank you. No additional actions are required at this time.

Registration does not guarantee a business relationship with Terex. Suppliers will be contacted by Terex Corporation if their profiles meet our needs.

Thank you for your interest in establishing a business relationship with Terex Corporation, its subsidiaries and affiliates.

Organization Details

Goods and services offered.

Helpful files

  • Commodity Class and Subclass definitions
  • Supplier Code of Conduct

Primary Contact Details

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Foreign Interventions in Haiti: A Brief History

For decades, international soldiers have deployed to Haiti, sometimes leaving behind a troubled legacy.

A group of people wearing blue police uniforms and helmets with shields.

By Frances Robles

Kenyan police officers are soon heading to Haiti with a daunting mission: help restore order to a country where killings and kidnappings are so rampant that hundreds of thousands of people have fled their homes and where, for years, it has been too dangerous to hold elections.

It is hardly the first time that an international force has gone to Haiti in the name of law and order. Or the second. Or even the third.

For the past century, soldiers from around the world — including the United States — have deployed to, and even invaded, Haiti.

In the past 30 years, the United Nations has launched at least six peacekeeping missions to Haiti. International soldiers have restored overthrown presidents, eased them out and helped train the Haitian National Police. But they have also left bleak legacies of sexual exploitation, civilian casualties and deadly disease.

Here’s a look at some of the international interventions in Haiti.

Has the United States ever invaded Haiti?

Yes. More than once.

The United States invaded Haiti in 1915, after the assassination of President Jean Vilbrun Guillaume Sam of Haiti that year, and stayed for nearly 20 years, one of the longest occupations in American history .

President Woodrow Wilson ordered the invasion in the name of preventing anarchy, but even U.S. government historians acknowledge that the deployment was more aimed at protecting U.S. assets in the area and keeping Germans at bay.

German merchants dominated commerce to Haiti and, at the time, were considered the United States’ chief rival in the Caribbean.

The Americans seized control of Haiti’s central bank and created a labor force akin to slavery. Americans oversaw the building of roads and hospitals, using the forced labor of poor Haitians. The United States installed puppet presidents and rewrote Haiti’s Constitution to give foreigners the right to own land.

As the Haitian American author Edwidge Danticat put it : “Call it gunboat diplomacy or a banana war, but this occupation was never meant — as the Americans professed — to spread democracy, especially given that certain democratic freedoms were not even available to the United States’ own Black citizens at the time.”

Americans also established a security force known as the gendarmerie, which later evolved into the Haitian Army.

When strikes and riots broke out in Haiti, U.S. Marines opened fire on protesters, killing 12 Haitians. On the heels of that massacre, President Herbert Hoover appointed a commission to study the withdrawal from Haiti, and the U.S. occupation ended in 1934.

Americans went back 60 years later with a mission that they called Operation Uphold Democracy.

In 1994, three years after the Haitian president Jean-Bertrand Aristide was overthrown in a military coup, President Bill Clinton ordered more than 20,000 troops to Haiti. The U.S. troops were met by cheers from masses of Haitians who supported Mr. Aristide, who was popular in low-income communities. He was restored to power and finished his term.

In 2004, the United States, Canada and France created the Multinational Interim Force, which deployed to Haiti when Mr. Aristide, who had been elected a second time, was forced out again.

What about the United Nations?

The United Nations has sent several missions to Haiti, each with its own unpronounceable acronym.

The U.N. said its 1993 mission, known as UNMIH, helped to create an atmosphere conducive to elections and assisted in the formation training and support of the new police force.

Several more missions followed, but none as long-lasting and notorious as the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, known as MINUSTAH, which lasted from 2004 to 2017.

After rebel forces had succeeded in toppling Mr. Aristide’s second presidency, and a few months after he left for exile, the U.N. Security Council authorized MINUSTAH to address armed conflicts that had spread to several Haitian cities.

The mission was supposed to support the transitional government by establishing a stable environment that would allow for elections and the delivery of international aid. The peacekeeping force the U.N. maintained in Haiti swelled at times to as many as 13,000 members.

The U.N. credited the force with helping the nation through a series of natural disasters, including a devastating 2010 earthquake, which the Haitian government says killed 316,000 people, including 102 MINUSTAH members.

The U.N. also noted that its mission had led to a reduction in homicides and political violence. In the U.N.’s telling, 15,000 police officers were trained, and kidnappings decreased by 95 percent.

“Thirteen years after the arrival of MINUSTAH, political violence has significantly diminished and immediate threats from armed gangs, whose origins are rooted in social and political divisions, have been significantly reduced,” António Guterres, the U.N. secretary general, wrote in a 2017 final report.

But he conceded that “many clear accomplishments aside,” cholera and sexual abuse by members of the U.N. force had cast a shadow over the agency’s relationship with the Haitian people.

At least 10,000 people died of cholera, which was introduced to the country through poor sanitation at a U.N. camp for Nepalese soldiers. Although the U.N. apologized, families of the sick and dead were never compensated.

The U.N. raised only 5 percent of the $400 million promised to help victims and build cholera treatment centers.

“It was quite shameful,” said Beatrice Lindstrom, a human rights lawyer who represented victims in an unsuccessful lawsuit against the U.N.

Soldiers sent to poor neighborhoods to root out gangs were also accused of several episodes of excessive force that left civilians dead. In some operations, the U.N. tore through grenades and tens of thousands of bullets.

“There’s real reason to be very concerned of what this Kenya mission is going to look like from a civilian casualty perspective,” Ms. Lindstrom said.

The U.N. is still grappling with the aftermath of the hundreds of children that soldiers fathered and abandoned in Haiti. In addition, in 2007, the U.N. announced it had sent back home 108 Sri Lankan soldiers who had sexually exploited minors.

Asked whether the mission was considered a success, the U.N. said in a statement that the deployment had “stabilized the country when it was on the brink of collapse, with deep polarization and political instability, a dysfunctional police force, and an almost nonexistent state authority.”

The U.N.’s support in vetting, recruiting and training Haitian police helped the, force grow from 2,500 officers to more than 15,000, the U.N. said.

“MINUSTAH opened space for political and democratic processes to take place, including the organization of electoral processes,” the statement said.

Still, experts worry that the troubled legacies of past interventions are simply repeating.

“None of these interventions have been beneficial to Haiti,” said Francois Pierre-Louis, chair of the Queens College political science department, who was a member of Mr. Aristide’s cabinet.

“I am against intervention by principle,” he added. “You have to let people be held responsible for their actions. Let them fail so they own the process.”

An earlier version of this article misidentified the U.S. president who appointed a commission to look into the American occupation of Haiti. It was Herbert Hoover, not Woodrow Wilson.

How we handle corrections

Frances Robles is a Times investigative reporter covering the United States and Latin America. She has been a journalist for more than 30 years. More about Frances Robles

IMAGES

  1. The 20 Best Places To Visit In Nicaragua

    visit nicaragua from haiti

  2. The 20 Best Places To Visit In Nicaragua

    visit nicaragua from haiti

  3. Our 20+ Favorite Things To Do In Nicaragua In 2020 Plus Best Attractions

    visit nicaragua from haiti

  4. 15 Top-Rated Attractions & Things to Do in Nicaragua

    visit nicaragua from haiti

  5. Top 10 Places To Visit In Nicaragua

    visit nicaragua from haiti

  6. Visit Lake Nicaragua: Exclusive Tours of Lago Cocibolca

    visit nicaragua from haiti

VIDEO

  1. Un viaje mágico por Nicaragua 🇳🇮🏖⛪🌄

  2. FTS 12:30 23-01: Haiti’s humanitarian situation worsens

  3. Rutas Caribeñas

  4. FTS 12:30 19-01: Haiti: gangs cause fear in several neighborhoods of Port-Au-Prince

  5. FTS 12:30 26-03: CNE confirms 12 candidacies for the July 28th presidential election

  6. Transitional Council formed in Haiti

COMMENTS

  1. Nicaragua tourist visa for Haitian citizens in 2024

    Central American Single Visa. The Central American Single Visa (Visa Única Centroamericana) is a visa for Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua. It was implemented by the CA-4 agreement. It allows citizens of those four countries free access to other member countries.

  2. Traveling to Nicaragua from Haiti in 2024: Passport, Visa Requirements

    Is it safe to travel to Nicaragua? Nicaragua has a current risk level of 3.60 (out of 5). We highly recommend to reconsider your need to travel to Nicaragua. The safety index is based on travel advisories from independent 5 sources. Safety index is provided by www.travel-advisory.info: 05/20/2024.

  3. ALERT: Updated Entry Requirements for Nicaragua

    Please follow the links or call the numbers below for consular assistance. Contact the S. Embassy in Managua, located at Km 5 ½ C. Sur Managua, Nicaragua, by calling +505-2252-7104, 7:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 7:15 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Fridays. The American Citizen Services unit is also available by email during regular ...

  4. Nicaragua International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  5. Visit World

    The Nicaragua visa fee upon arrival is approximately $50 USD. The fee may vary depending on your nationality. Please note that even if you are exempt from obtaining a visa to enter Nicaragua, you still need to obtain a Nicaraguan tourist card upon arrival, which costs $10. In addition, according to the CA-4 agreement between El Salvador ...

  6. Nicaragua Tourism

    Adventure/Discover Nicaragua/Travel. 1 min read. In the middle of a freshwater lake is the paradisiacal Ometepe Island, a sanctuary that preserves the flora and fauna of this jewel, located in the department of Rivas. Due to its wide natural offering, the island has various places where you can portray iconic, unique and fascinating moments.

  7. Nicaragua Visa

    Here are some interesting facts on why you should visit Nicaragua: Nicaragua is known as the land of volcanos. There are charming colorful buildings in the country. You can surf in the country almost every single day. The largest lake in Central America is in Nicaragua. You have incredible hotels that will make your visit to Nicaragua worthwhile.

  8. Haiti to Nicaragua

    Rome2Rio makes travelling from Haiti to Nicaragua easy. Rome2Rio is a door-to-door travel information and booking engine, helping you get to and from any location in the world. Find all the transport options for your trip from Haiti to Nicaragua right here.

  9. Nicaragua visa for citizens of Haiti

    travelling to. Nicaragua. : Visa required. Citizens of Haiti require a visa to travel to Nicaragua. Check current Covid-19 entry requirements before travelling.

  10. Travel to Nicaragua: Visa Requirements and Entry Rules in 2024

    Are you going to visit Nicaragua? This page contains important information about the visa requirements and entry rules in 2024. ... Republic of Nicaragua is a country in the Central America. Its total area is about 130.4K km 2, population — more than 6.6M. ... Haiti. visa required : Honduras. visa free (90 days) Hungary. visa free (90 days ...

  11. Do Haitian Citizens Require a Visa to Visit Nicaragua?

    Visa Required. Visa is required to enter this country. You must apply for a visa before traveling to this country. There are various types of visas one can apply for, such as student visas, working visas, and touristic visas, which all fall into this category. Nevertheless, remember that every category has a distinguished variety of requirements.

  12. Visa and Passport for Nicaragua

    Nicaragua has a population of 5.6 million individuals and is rich in natural resources such as lead, gold, fish, copper and timber. It is a country that has been so wrapped up in war, corruption and government changes, that it has had little time to take advantage of agricultural products such as sugarcane, lobsters, beef, tobacco, coffee and rice.

  13. Processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans

    The U.S. government may grant advance travel authorization to up to 30,000 noncitizens each month to seek parole on a case-by-case basis under the processes for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans, and Venezuelans. ... Haiti, Nicaragua, or Venezuela; or be an immediate family member (spouse, common-law partner, and/or unmarried child under the age of ...

  14. Book affordable flights to Nicaragua from Haiti

    There are 2 airlines that fly from Haiti to Nicaragua. The most popular route is from Toussaint Louverture International Airport in Port-au-Prince to Augusto Cesar Sandino International Airport in Managua. On average this flight takes 12 hours 14 minutes one way and costs $731 round-trip.

  15. Nicaragua Visa

    VisaHQ makes it easy and simple to apply for a Nicaragua eVisa. Here are the quick and easy instructions for obtaining your E-Visa: Visit the VisaHQ Website: Head to the VisaHQ website and locate the Nicaragua E-Visa section. Complete the Application Form: Fill out the online application form with accurate and up-to-date information, ensuring ...

  16. Haiti suspends all Nicaragua-bound flights

    The Haiti-Nicaragua flights began in August and have grown from seven flights a day to as many as 15 daily charters. There are also charter flights from the neighboring Dominican Republic and the ...

  17. Nicaragua is 'weaponizing' US-bound migrants as Haitians pour in on

    They were among about 3,000 migrants gathered outside the asylum office, among them Nilda Jean, a 28-year-old farmer from Haiti. Jean said she paid $3,000 for her flight to Nicaragua and sacrificed a lot only to now find herself sleeping on the streets outside the asylum offices with the hope of reaching the U.S.

  18. Thousands of Haitians rush to Nicaragua, seeing it as "bridge" to US

    Haitians heading to Nicaragua squeezing through one of the entrances of the Cap-Haitien International Airport on Oct. 26, 2023. Photo by Onz Chery for The Haitian Times. CAP-HAITIEN — As soon as the glass door of the Cap-Haitien International Airport opened on a cloudy morning on Oct. 26, about 10 people shoved and pressed against each other ...

  19. Traveling to Haiti from Nicaragua in 2024: Passport, Visa Requirements

    Nicaraguan citizens do not need a tourist visa when travelling to Haiti in 2024. Nicaraguan passport holders can stay in Haiti for a short period of time (for 90 days). Please, read all the information below to make your trip easy and safe. Don't rely on information from only one source. Please, with at least one more source listed in the link ...

  20. Embassy of Nicaragua in Haiti

    in. Haiti. VisaHQ has no information about Embassy of Nicaragua in Haiti. Please feel free to contribute by using the form below. Make a suggestion. Nicaragua Embassy to Haiti: detailed information on Nicaraguan Embassy and Consulates locations, including addresses, e-mails and phone numbers.

  21. Nicaragua to Haiti

    Rome2Rio makes travelling from Nicaragua to Haiti easy. Rome2Rio is a door-to-door travel information and booking engine, helping you get to and from any location in the world. Find all the transport options for your trip from Nicaragua to Haiti right here.

  22. United States occupation of Haiti

    The United States occupation of Haiti began on July 28, 1915, when 330 U.S. Marines landed at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, after the National City Bank of New York convinced the President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson, to take control of Haiti's political and financial interests. The July 1915 invasion took place following years of ...

  23. US imposes sanctions on Nicaragua over repression, migrant smuggling

    The United States on Wednesday imposed visa restrictions on more than 250 members of the Nicaraguan government and levied sanctions on three Nicaraguan entities in retaliation for "repressive ...

  24. Nicaragua

    Nicaragua, oficialmente llamado República de Nicaragua, es un país ubicado en América Central.Su capital y ciudad más poblada es Managua, aunque anteriormente era León.Está compuesta por quince departamentos y dos regiones autónomas: Costa Caribe Norte y Costa Caribe Sur.Se ubica en el hemisferio norte, entre la línea ecuatorial y el trópico de Cáncer, aproximadamente entre los 11 ...

  25. Suppliers at Terex

    Supplier Registration. If you have previously registered, thank you. No additional actions are required at this time. Registration does not guarantee a business relationship with Terex. Suppliers will be contacted by Terex Corporation if their profiles meet our needs. Thank you for your interest in establishing a business relationship with ...

  26. International Plans

    If you're a T-Mobile customer on qualifying plan, you can add an International Pass to get more high-speed data and unlimited voice calling in 215+ countries and destinations. 1-Day (512MB) International Pass: 512MB of high-speed data and unlimited calling, to be used up to 24 hours, for $5. 10 day (5GB) International Pass: 5GB of high-speed ...

  27. U.S. Takes Additional Steps to Counter Repression in Nicaragua

    The repression of the Nicaraguan people by the regime of President Daniel Ortega and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo, continues. The U.S. State Department's recently released human rights report on Nicaragua noted, "Individuals linked to the government of President Daniel Ortega Saavedra carried out a campaign of harassment, intimidation, and violence toward perceived enemies of ...

  28. Foreign Interventions in Haiti: A Brief History

    Bettmann, via Getty Images. Yes. More than once. The United States invaded Haiti in 1915, after the assassination of President Jean Vilbrun Guillaume Sam of Haiti that year, and stayed for nearly ...