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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Vaccine

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  • Immunization Record  for proof of vaccination

The COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective. 

It can reduce your risk of:

  • COVID-19 symptoms
  • Severe illness and hospitalization
  • Long-term health effects, such as Long COVID

The best way to protect yourself and others is to stay up to date with the COVID-19 vaccinations.

Everyone 6 years and older should get the new, updated COVID-19 vaccine, even if they’ve received any original COVID-19 vaccines. Young children, seniors, and people at high-risk may need extra doses.

If you have questions or concerns, talk to your medical provider.

Learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Vaccine Recommendations

Everyone 6 months and older should get the new, updated COVID-19 vaccine. This new vaccine protects against both the original virus that causes COVID-19 and current variants.

The new, updated Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are the only brands of the updated COVID-19 vaccine currently available in the US. It doesn’t matter which brand you choose. Older Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are no longer available.

You should get the updated vaccine, even if you’ve already received:

  • Any original COVID-19 vaccines
  • The older bivalent booster that targeted earlier Omicron subvariants

The number of doses you need depends on your age and if you’re at risk of severe COVID-19 illness.

If you recently had COVID-19, talk to your health care provider about when you should get your next vaccine.

People 5 Years or Older

Everyone 5 years and older should get one dose of the new, updated COVID-19 vaccine. You can get the new vaccine two months after your last dose.

If you are 65 or older, you may get a second dose of the updated vaccine 4 or more months after your first dose. Talk to your health care provider if you have questions about the number of doses you need.

Children Younger Than 5

Children 6 months to 4 years old need multiple doses of COVID-19 vaccines. Young children get the same vaccine as for adults, but at a lower dose.

The number of doses needed for this age group depends on the child’s vaccination history.

  • Schedule: Second dose given at least 21 days after the first, and the third dose given at least 56 days after the second.
  • Doses: 2 (if immunocompromised, the child should get three doses)
  • Schedule: Second dose given at least 28 days after the first
  • If the child has already received one or more doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, talk to your child’s health care provider. The child should get at least one dose of the new, updated Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, but the total number of doses they need depends on the vaccine and how many doses they’ve previously received.

People with a Weakened Immune System

If you have a weakened immune system, you should get more than one dose of the new, updated COVID-19 vaccine. You can get additional doses as long as they are given at least two months apart.

If you have never received a COVID-19 vaccine, you should get three vaccine doses as part of your initial series. Then, you can also get additional doses at least 2 months after the last one.

Talk with your health care provider if you have questions about how many vaccine doses you should get. 

Vaccine Sites

All people aged 6 months and older, regardless of residency or immigration status, are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in NYC. 

You can get the vaccine for free at some sites. Other sites may charge a copay or other fee. Check with the site or provider before you go.

Vaccine Finder  can help you find vaccination sites, mobile buses, and pop-ups near you that:

  • Accept walk-ups
  • Offer or require appointments
  • Are accessible for people with disabilities (check to confirm site-specific availability)
  • Provide a specific vaccine type

Visit nyc.gov/VaccineFinder.

Before You Go

Before you can get a vaccine, you must:

1) Bring a document showing proof of age, such as a:

  • Driver’s license or non-driver ID
  • Birth certificate issued by a state or local government
  • Current U.S passport or valid foreign passport
  • Permanent resident card
  • Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship
  • Life insurance policy with birthdate
  • Marriage certificate with birthdate

2) Provide written or verbal consent if your child is getting the vaccine:

  • A parent or guardian must provide consent for their child to be vaccinated in person, by phone or in writing, depending on the vaccination site. They will not need to provide proof they are the child's parent or guardian.
  • Children ages 15 and younger should be accompanied to the vaccination site by a parent or guardian, or another adult caregiver designated by the parent or guardian.

After You Get the Vaccine

After you get vaccinated at a City or State site, you'll be given a card with the following:

  • Your name, date of birth, and medical record number (if you have one)
  • Name of the vaccine you were given
  • Date and place you got the shot

Cancel or Reschedule an Appointment

If you need to reschedule or cancel a vaccine appointment, contact the site where you scheduled your appointment. Phone numbers are listed on nyc.gov/VaccineFinder.

If you have an appointment with an NYC Health + Hospitals site, you can cancel or reschedule by phone.

  • Agency: NYC Health + Hospitals
  • Phone Number: (844) 692-4692
  • Business Hours: 24 hours, 7 days a week

Accessibility

Disability and Language Access

Each City-run vaccination site has:

  • An accessible entrance and exit, restroom, and pathway to the vaccination area
  • Video translation services for more than 240 languages, including American Sign Language
  • A Disability Access and Functional Needs (DAFN) Coordinator to help you during your visit

Most sites will not require you to complete any paper documentation during your visit. If it is required, the DAFN Coordinator can help you complete it.

You may bring a companion, personal care attendant, personal care aide, family member, or other person to help you during your appointment. This can include someone who can interpret for you.

You may also bring a service animal or mobility device such as a wheelchair or walker.

If you need to request a reasonable accommodation, visit the  Disability Access  page.

The City no longer offers in-home vaccination for COVID-19. Talk to your doctor if you are homebound and need a COVID-19 vaccine.

Transportation for Seniors

You can schedule transportation to your vaccine appointment if you are 65 or older and:

  • Cannot use public transportation,
  • Cannot use private transportation, and
  • Cannot rely on friends or family members for transport.

You must already have a vaccine appointment before scheduling transportation. However, you do not need an appointment for City-run vaccination sites.

If you are between the ages of 60 and 64, visit the Transportation for Seniors  page instead for other transportation options.

Access-a-Ride

If you already use Access-a-Ride, you can schedule transportation to your appointment as you normally would.

  • Agency: Metropolitan Transportation Authority
  • Division: Access-A-Ride
  • Phone Number: (718) 393-4999
  • Business Hours: Daily: 7 AM - 5 PM
  • Staff is available through the automated phone system during business hours. Automated assistance is also available in Spanish. If you get a busy signal, call (877) 337-2017.

If you have Medicaid-provided transportation, you can use your usual contact number to schedule transport. You can also call Medicaid Transportation Management.

  • Agency: Medicaid Transportation Management
  • Phone Number: (844) 666-6270

Vaccine Mandates

COVID-19 vaccination is optional.

The City doesn't require you to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination to enter or work at businesses, workplaces, schools, child care, government offices, and other facilities in NYC. However, businesses and workplaces can still require staff and customers to be vaccinated if they choose.

Side Effects

Call your health care provider if: 

  • You have side effects that concern you
  • Redness or soreness where you got the shot increases after 24 hours
  • Side effects don’t go away after a few days

You can also report side effects to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS is managed by the CDC and Food and Drug Administration. 

You can make a report online or by phone. Your information will be kept confidential.

Report side effects to VAERS.

  • Agency: Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System
  • Phone Number: (800) 822-7967
  • Business Hours: Monday - Friday: 9 AM - 5 PM

Disclaimer:

The City intends to use the data collected from this survey to generally add and improve City services. Survey participation is voluntary. Participants in this survey will not receive further communication from the City with regards to this survey.

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Updated 12/13/2023

WHILE IN NEW YORK

Call ahead and check websites and social media to make sure attractions and amenities are open and available.

If you test positive for COVID-19 while you’re in New York, please isolate and wear a well-fitting mask per the CDC guidelines and call the following numbers for information on treatments and other assistance: 1-888-364-3065 (All of New York State) 1-212-COVID19 (212-268-4319) (New York City only)

MASK & VACCINATION GUIDANCE

Wearing a well-fitting face mask or respirator (i.e. KN95, KF94 or N95 or higher rated mask)  completely covering your nose and mouth  and staying current on COVID-19 vaccines and boosters can help keep you and the communities you are visiting safe. 

Masks and proof of COVID-19 vaccination continue to be required in all cities, localities, and private businesses that choose to require them despite the removal of statewide mandates. Businesses and venues may require COVID-19 safety measures for some or all events they host.

Please be respectful of the request to show proof of vaccine status or put on a mask properly covering both nose and mouth at an attraction or in a place of business.

Visitors to NYC who are interested in finding mask-required venues and events can find relevant information on the NYC Mask Guide site  (note: clicking this link will take you to a separate website created by local residents, these listings are not curated by I LOVE NY).

INTERNATIONAL VISITORS

As of May 12, 2023, international visitors are no longer required to show proof of vaccination to enter the United States.

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  • coronavirus new york city

NYC vaccine mandate: What you need to visit restaurants, gyms, venues

CDC-issued vaccine cards, the NYS Excelsior Pass and the NYC COVID Safe app are valid forms of proof.

WABC logo

NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- New York City's first-in-the-nation vaccine mandate took effect Tuesday, meaning everyone who enters restaurants, gyms, entertainment venues, and other businesses will need to be vaccinated.

They will also have to show proof in the form of a CDC-issued vaccine card, the New York State Excelsior Pass or the NYC COVID Safe app.

Even photograph of a vaccination card is acceptable.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has told businesses this will be no different than checking customers' IDs before serving alcohol.

"Just buy into this because it's going to work for all of us, is going to make us all safer," de Blasio said Monday.

RELATED | NY launches Excelsior Pass Plus to expand proof of COVID-19 vaccination program

The city is giving businesses nearly a month before it starts enforcing the rule, on September 13, but that doesn't mean there isn't concern about the mandate's impact.

The rules apply to everyone -- customers, employees, New York City residents, commuters and visitors alike -- in settings ranging from arenas to coffee shops to yoga studios. Even strip clubs are included.

There are exceptions for children under 12, who are not yet eligible for vaccination, and athletes, contractors and some performers who don't live in the city.

The policy also excludes church potlucks, community centers, office buildings, house parties - even if they're catered - and people ducking in somewhere to pick up food or use the bathroom, among other exemptions.

The mayor has laid out a fine structure for businesses caught not ensuring indoor customers are vaccinated.

It ranges from $1000 for the first offense, $2000 for the second, and $5000 for the third.

RELATED | CVS, Walgreens offering 3rd dose of COVID-19 vaccine for immunocompromised Americans

can you visit nyc without vaccine

City officials have promised training for businesses on how to handle possible confrontations between patrons and staffers, who will be on the frontlines of checking vaccination status.

Business owners have offered differing predictions on how their customers will react to the mandate.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, one of the city's most visited venues, said it was working on how to implement the new rule but supports it.

So does the NYC Hospitality Alliance, a restaurant and bar owners' group, though executive director Andrew Rigie said the vaccine checks add another challenge for establishments struggling to recover from pandemic shutdowns and a labor shortage.

But restaurateurs hope the requirement will help keep the outbreak from worsening and spurring more onerous restrictions.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

can you visit nyc without vaccine

MORE CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 COVERAGE

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NYC Lifts Vaccine Mandate for Restaurants, Bars — What to Know

"We are open for business and New York City has its groove back," New York City Mayor Eric Adams said.

can you visit nyc without vaccine

New York City lifted its vaccine mandate for bars, restaurants, and other indoor spaces on Monday, according to the city's mayor, but the jab will still be required for certain tourist attractions.

Under the new rules, businesses like restaurants and entertainment venues will no longer be required to check guests for proof of vaccination to enter, but individual businesses will be allowed to implement their own vaccination or masking rules. The city first put its vaccine requirement for indoor venues into effect in September 2021, calling the initiative "A Key to NYC."

"Two years ago, New York City was the epicenter of the pandemic, but thanks to New Yorkers getting vaccinated and getting boosted we have made tremendous progress," the city's Mayor Eric Adams said in a statement . "I've said time and time again that the numbers and science will guide us as we continue to recover and rebuild, and now New York City is back, and vaccinations are why we're back… The fight may not be over, but we're clearly winning the war. We are open for business and New York City has its groove back."

While vaccine mandates for guests were lifted on Monday, other pandemic-related rules, including the requirement that employees be vaccinated, would still remain, according to Adams' office.

Additionally, not all popular tourist venues would be lifting their vaccine mandates. Broadway, for example, will still require both proof of full vaccination and masks for all performances through at least April 30, according to The Broadway League .

And The Metropolitan Opera requires all performers, employees, and audience members to show proof of a COVID-19 booster shot.

Masks will also be required on city subways and buses, in line with the federal transportation mask mandate that has been extended until at least March 18.

New York City's decision to lift its vaccine mandate comes as other cities have made similar moves to ease pandemic-era protocols, including the Hawaiian islands of Maui and Honolulu , which each dropped their vaccine or test requirements for restaurants and bars, as well as Los Angeles , which stopped requiring proof of vaccination or a negative test to enter places like bars and wineries.

However, San Francisco , which first implemented its mandate in August 2021 , still requires proof of vaccination or a negative test to enter bars, restaurants, clubs, and more, according to the city .

Alison Fox is a contributing writer for Travel + Leisure. When she's not in New York City, she likes to spend her time at the beach or exploring new destinations and hopes to visit every country in the world. Follow her adventures on Instagram .

NBC New York

NYC to Require Proof of Vaccination for Indoor Dining, Theatres, Gyms

New york city will require proof of vaccination for a wide variety of indoor activities. the new requirement will be phased in over several weeks in august and september, published august 3, 2021 • updated on august 4, 2021 at 3:40 am, what to know.

  • New York City will soon require proof of COVID-19 vaccinations for anyone who wants to dine indoors at a restaurant, see a performance or go to the gym, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Tuesday
  • It is the first big city in the U.S. to impose such restrictions. The new requirement will be phased in over several weeks in August and September
  • It s the most aggressive step the city has taken yet to curb a surge in cases caused by the delta variant. Data shows that about 66% of adults in New York City are fully vaccinated

New York City will now require proof of vaccination for a wide range of indoor activities like dining, fitness and entertainment, part of an increasing crackdown on those who remain unvaccinated.

The new requirement, which will be phased in over several weeks in August and September, is the most aggressive step the city has taken yet to curb a surge in cases caused by the delta variant. Enforcement of what is being called the "Key to NYC Pass" is set to begin Sept. 13, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Tuesday. It will be its own digital platform, separate from the state's Excelsior Pass, though the latter will also be valid, as will paper vaccination cards.

"Climbing this ladder is giving us more and more ability to fight back (against) the delta variant," the mayor said Tuesday.

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It remains unclear, though, what the policy will be for those who can't be vaccinated -- either for medical or religious reasons, or for those under age 12 who are not yet eligible. De Blasio said some of those details are still under consideration.

Met Gala, Broadway and Everywhere Mandating COVID Vaccine for Workers, Customers

But the mayor has made no secret in recent days of his intention to ramp up restrictions on the unvaccinated.

"If people still hesitate, we're going to be climbing that ladder faster and more. I think you're going to see in short order more and more activities be only for vaccinated folks," De Blasio said last week.

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The move comes as the highly transmissible delta variant continues its surge in New York City unabated, now accounting 72% of all positive samples -- roughly triple where it was three weeks ago.

At the same time, virtually every important infection metric in the city is getting worse too, with daily confirmed and probable cases as of last Friday some 24 percent higher than they were a week earlier.

De Blasio said Monday he was making “a strong recommendation” that  everyone wear a mask in public indoor settings  but stressed that the city’s “overwhelming strategic thrust” remained getting more people vaccinated.

Asked Tuesday about a mask mandate, de Blasio said all options were on the table but reiterated the city's policy is “vaccine-centric.”

“Right now what we want to nail is people getting vaccinated, and, very bluntly, showing that life is much better when you’re vaccinated," he added. “You have more freedom when you’re vaccinated, and you have a lot less, you have fewer choices, fewer opportunities if you're not vaccinated.”

The mayor announced last week  that city employees would be required to get vaccinated  by mid-September or face weekly testing, and he has offered a $100 incentive for city residents who get inoculated.

De Blasio said Tuesday that he did not think checking vaccination status should be too difficult for businesses, which already have to take tickets or show diners to a table.

Some disagreed.

Seongmin Jun, the manager of Dear Han Cafe in Queens, wondered how he would check vaccination cards while handling the periodic rush of patrons and serving as the cafe’s only barista.

“Will customers get offended for checking if they got COVID vaccinations? I mean I don’t know how to do that, or even if I will have time to do that,” Jun said.

The coffee shop opened just months before the pandemic spread early last year.

“They’re making it too hard for businesspeople,” Jun said, but acknowledged something has to be done to get the virus under control. “I get what they are trying to say, but there must be another way to reduce the cases of COVID.”

Sean Ogs, manager of the nearby Woodside Cafe, said he was “floored” when he heard the news about the new vaccination mandate.

“We’ve already been in a struggle. I don’t know how I’m going to deal with it,” Ogs said. “It’s going to be extra work. It’ll make things impossible.”

Woodside Cafe customer Debbie McCarthy, who is unvaccinated, said she was turned away over the weekend from several establishments that had already begun requiring proof of vaccinations from patrons.

“I’m a little shocked they would do that,” said McCarthy, who said she recovered from COVID-19 a few months ago and believes her natural antibodies will protect from future infections. “Why are they so afraid of people who haven’t been vaccinated? I think we should have a choice."

Scientists recommend vaccination for people who have had the virus, saying  it's unclear how long immunity without vaccination for those who have recovered  would last.

Andrew Rigie, executive director of the NYC Hospitality Alliance restaurant group, said he supports the new policy to ensure “that New York City does not revert to restrictions and shut down orders that would again absolutely devastate small businesses that have not yet recovered from the pandemic.”

The Five-Borough Chamber Alliance agreed that the mandate was a “complicated decisions,” but said it was “worthy of support for protecting public health and keeping the city on the path to full economic recovery.”

Fitness studio owner Bill Zanker said he supports the policy as well, even though it comes as another hurdle after a long coronavirus shutdown.

“We’ve got to encourage people to get vaccinated. ... We’re happy to enforce that,” said Zanker, the CEO of GRIT BXNG, a Manhattan studio that offers boxing-related workouts and a full bar. “Unfortunately, it will affect the business again.”

Not sure how the process works? Check out our handy tri-state vaccine site finder and FAQs here

New York City and New Jersey Vaccine Providers

Click on each provider to find more information on scheduling appointments for the COVID-19 Vaccine.

Data: City of New York, State of New Jersey • Nina Lin / NBC

The studio had been open for just seven months before the pandemic shutdown began in March 2020. Since reopening this past May, GRIT has checked patrons’ vaccination status, offering some inoculated-only classes where people could go without masks while unvaccinated people had to take other classes and cover their faces, he said. About 25% of the patrons are unvaccinated, he said.

Major performance venues including Broadway theaters and the Metropolitan Opera have already announced that vaccinations will be required for patrons.

About 66% of adults in New York City are fully vaccinated, according to official data.

On Monday, the U.S. reached the president's goal of  getting at least one COVID-19 shot into 70% of American adults  — a month late and amid a surge by the delta variant that is overwhelming hospitals and prompting renewed pandemic regulations around the country.

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Domestic travel for unvaccinated travelers

International travel for unvaccinated travelers, final thoughts on traveling without a covid vaccine.

Between constantly changing entry requirements, mandated quarantines, testing rules and vaccine provisions, traveling during the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t easy. If you’re not vaccinated, it's even harder. Some countries flat-out don’t admit unvaccinated travelers, while others require a mandatory quarantine and extra tests.

If you plan on traveling and aren't vaccinated, here’s what you need to know.

As recently as Jan. 12, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend delaying travel until you’re fully vaccinated.

Requirements are up to each city and state. For example, while Illinois doesn’t have statewide restrictions, its recommendations differ based on the daily COVID-19 case rates of the state the traveler is arriving from. Unvaccinated travelers arriving from states with higher case rates are encouraged to secure a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of travel to Illinois. At the city level, unvaccinated travelers going to Chicago are asked to get tested for COVID-19 before and after arrival and to quarantine upon arrival.

Meanwhile, all travelers 16 and older who enter California via Los Angeles International Airport, Van Nuys Airport or Los Angeles Union Station are required to fill out a City of Los Angeles Traveler Form, agreeing to follow CDC travel guidance — or face up to a $500 fine.

Other states may be more flexible and have no recommendations or requirements related to vaccination, quarantine, forms or testing for visitors.

Tips for traveling domestically without a vaccine

If the required time frame for getting a COVID-19 test ahead of travel is less than 24 hours, check if an urgent care center near you offers a rapid results option. In addition, check if a PCR and/or antigen test will be accepted. Generally, results from an antigen test can be provided faster. If you have insurance, the test may be covered.

Before heading to your intended destination, check the city and state requirements and recommendations, because they may differ (like Chicago and Illinois). Find out if your destination has any special requirements based on the state you’re arriving from.

Some businesses require proof of vaccination for entry. Be prepared to be turned away from restaurants, bars, stores and other establishments if this is the case.

Check if there are any ongoing testing requirements. For example, unvaccinated travelers staying in Puerto Rico longer than a week must submit weekly COVID-19 test results.

» Learn more: The majority of Americans plan to travel this year, according to recent NerdWallet study

Traveling internationally may present a greater number of obstacles, especially due to different systems and a potential language barrier. Some countries don't allow unvaccinated travelers to enter, period . For example, travel to the majority of European countries is possible only to those who are vaccinated. If you’re not vaccinated, make sure the country you want to visit will allow you entry.

In addition, before returning to the U.S., you’re required to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within one day of the flight's departure. While abroad, you’ll need to go to a COVID-19 testing center. Unlike getting tested in the U.S., COVID-19 tests abroad aren't covered by insurance, so you'll need to budget for the out-of-pocket cost .

Furthermore, you should book your accommodations wisely. Does the hotel you want to stay at allow unvaccinated guests? Will you be able to dine at the hotel restaurant? Can you use the spa or gym facilities? These are important questions you’ll need to consider before booking an international hotel stay.

Scrutinize your access to activities and other places you’d like to visit during your trip, too, like restaurants and museums. On my recent trip to Germany, I had to show my proof of vaccination and identification in every bar, restaurant, shop and hotel I entered.

If you’re unvaccinated, you may be refused entry to all these places, which can ruin your trip.

Tips for traveling internationally without a vaccine

Get travel insurance with Cancel For Any Reason coverage since entry requirements are changing constantly. What happens if you book a nonrefundable flight and hotel, and a week before your departure, your destination stops allowing in unvaccinated travelers? If you have travel insurance with CFAR, you’ll be able to cancel your trip and get your nonrefundable deposits back so long as changes aren’t made at the last minute. For example, with CFAR coverage from Berkshire Hathaway Travel Protection, "you may only be eligible if you purchase CFAR at the time of your base policy purchase, insure your full trip cost, and cancel more than 48 hours prior to departure," according to the company's website.

Confirm entry eligibility for your must-have experiences, like restaurants, museums, shopping malls or bars and clubs. Double-check that your hotel will allow you entry as well.

Research COVID-19 testing sites in the area before departure. Will you need to travel far to get your test? Consider travel time when making a test appointment.

Check if there's an app that your destination country uses that will accept your pre-departure negative COVID-19 test result. This step could make it easier to visit any bars, hotels, shops, restaurants and museums you’d like to check out.

Traveling domestically and internationally may pose a new set of challenges for those who are unvaccinated. Be sure to keep up to date with the latest requirements to make sure that your trip goes smoothly. International travel may result in many more difficulties, so if you’re not prepared to deal with all the uncertainties of being abroad, consider travel to a location within the U.S.

How to maximize your rewards

You want a travel credit card that prioritizes what’s important to you. Here are our picks for the best travel credit cards of 2023 , including those best for:

Flexibility, point transfers and a large bonus: Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

No annual fee:   Bank of America® Travel Rewards credit card

Flat-rate travel rewards:  Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card  

Bonus travel rewards and high-end perks: Chase Sapphire Reserve®

Luxury perks: The Platinum Card® from American Express

Business travelers: Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card

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1.5%-6.5% Enjoy 6.5% cash back on travel purchased through Chase Ultimate Rewards®; 4.5% cash back on drugstore purchases and dining at restaurants, including takeout and eligible delivery service, and 3% on all other purchases (on up to $20,000 spent in the first year). After your first year or $20,000 spent, enjoy 5% cash back on Chase travel purchased through Ultimate Rewards®, 3% cash back on drugstore purchases and dining at restaurants, including takeout and eligible delivery service, and unlimited 1.5% cash back on all other purchases.

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can you visit nyc without vaccine

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can you visit nyc without vaccine

Also, for the Statue of Liberty, there is an option to buy a child ticket for ages 12 and under, do they ask for proof of children's ages for these tickets? The 12 year old could easily pass for 14, and my 13 year old could pass for 16, so I don't want to have a problem with buying the ticket for the 12 year old.

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Unless you and your daughters are vaccinated, there is very little you can do indoors & it has been very cold in the northeast this year.

https://www.nycgo.com/coronavirus-information-and-resources-for-travelers

can you visit nyc without vaccine

You can find more info here:

https://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/covid/covid-19-vaccines-keytonyc.page

Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island are USGov’t sores so the rules there are different.

You will not be able to visit museums of dine indoors without proof of vax.

Things to do without vax —- be sure to click on link in the responses too.

https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g60763-i5-k13804214-Do_you_have_to_be_vaccinated_to_do_anything_in_nyc-New_York_City_New_York.html

Two of the three hotels we have stayed in since the rules went in to place asked us for vax proof. If your hotel provides food, like breakfast, they might require vax proof at checkin so they don’t have to check everyone at breakfast each day.

can you visit nyc without vaccine

-You need to contact the hotel that you plan to book to confirm.

-I have not been in any store that has asked me for vax proof. I do wear my mask inside.

-There are many things that you can do outside, if you are prepared to deal with the potential cold weather.

-Restaurants? You can eat outside or get takeout from many places. You can't eat inside.

If you are all ok with being outside in cold weather for 8 to 10 hours a day with a few stops into stores and eating outside then sure, it is doable. Fun? Only you know your family.

***-You need to contact the hotel that you plan to book to confirm.

-Restaurants? You can eat outside or get takeout from many places. You can't eat inside.***

The above information is spot on.

Come and enjoy yourself. Stay in the city, hotels in NJ can work, but add another layer for commuting. Call hotels to verify, but you'll find one.

This topic has been closed to new posts due to inactivity.

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can you visit nyc without vaccine

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Update on Change to U.S. Travel Policy Requiring COVID-19 Vaccination for nonimmigrant travel

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The Administration will end the COVID-19 vaccine requirements for international air travelers at the end of the day on May 11, the same day that the COVID-19 public health emergency ends. This means starting May 12, noncitizen nonimmigrant air passengers will no longer need to show proof of being fully vaccinated with an accepted COVID-19 vaccine to board a flight to the United States. CDC’s Amended Order Implementing Presidential Proclamation on Safe Resumption of Global Travel During the COVID-19 Pandemic will no longer be in effect when the Presidential Proclamation Advancing the Safe Resumption of Global Travel During the COVID-19 Pandemic is revoked .

Please see: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2023/05/01/the-biden-administration-will-end-covid-19-vaccination-requirements-for-federal-employees-contractors-international-travelers-head-start-educators-and-cms-certified-facilities/

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can you visit nyc without vaccine

  • COVID-19 Resources for all New Yorkers

Get your COVID-19 Vaccine Today

Updated monovalent covid-19 vaccines recommended for everyone 6 months and older.

At NYC Health + Hospitals, we continue to be here for all your COVID-19 needs. Updated Monovalent COVID-19 vaccines are now available at all hospitals and Gotham Health clinics. These vaccines have been updated for the 2023-2024 season and are designed to protect against newer COVID-19 variants.

Everyone ages 6 months and older should get an updated COVID-19 vaccine.

While healthy people can also become very sick from COVID-19, the vaccine is more likely to be lifesaving for people who:

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Vaccination can help reduce the duration and severity of COVID-19 symptoms if you become infected and it reduces the risk of long COVID. You can also get your annual flu shot on the same day as your updated COVID vaccine.

To make an appointment, call 1-844-NYC-4NYC (1-844-692-4692)

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You can show the CDC card you received when you got vaccinated or sign up for these online vaccination passes:

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Call  1-877-VAX-4NYC  or  1-877-829-4692

*If your child is 6 months to 4 years old and a NYC Health + Hospitals patient, please call your child’s pediatrician to schedule.  If your child is not a NYC Health + Hospitals patient, use the  City’s Vaccine Finder  or call 877-VAX-4NYC (877-829-4692) to schedule an appointment at certain sites, as well as to get other vaccination assistance.

Before Your Appointment

You must reside in the United States to receive the vaccine.

You will need to complete the  New York State COVID-19 Vaccine Form  in order to get vaccinated. The State requires the provider administering the vaccine to check that you completed the form.

Before you visit us for your vaccination, also keep in mind these tips:

  • Bring proof of age  – A parent or guardian must provide consent for a child to be vaccinated.
  • Reschedule if you are sick  – You will be unable to receive the vaccine if you have active COVID-19 or a COVID-19 test result pending. You should also reschedule if you are not feeling well on the day of your appointment.
  • Bring your health insurance card  – COVID-19 vaccines are free with no out of pocket costs to all New Yorkers regardless of insurance status. But if you have health insurance, we will bill your insurance.

For more information, visit:

New York State Department of Health NYC Department of Health Center for Disease Control

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Vinay K. Aggarwal

Vinay K. Aggarwal

Osteoarthritis is more common than you think: how to treat and prevent it from worsening.

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Osteoarthritis affects everyone on the planet, particularly as we get older. The condition is caused by wear and tear on the protective layer of cartilage on the ends of our bones — not unlike wearing down the tread on a tire. The cartilage helps our joints glide smoothly without pain, popping or stiffness. 

We sat down with Dr. Vinay K. Aggarwal , a hip and knee reconstruction specialist in NYU Langone’s Department of Orthopedic Surgery , who said there are very effective ways to prevent progression with a balanced lifestyle.

I’m 50 years old and have developed osteoarthritis. What I can do to prevent it from worsening?

One of the first things patients say when they see me is that they’ve developed joint pain that affects them daily. “I know I have arthritis everywhere,” they say, and this is often an accurate description of what’s going in their body. 

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition, and the amount you have is key to how symptomatic you may be. Osteoarthritis is most common in the hip joints , causing pain in the groin and sides of the hips, and the knee joints , leading to pain in the front, sides or the back of the knees.

Osteoarthritis is caused by wear and tear on the protective layer of cartilage on the ends of our bones — not unlike wearing down the tread on a tire.

Some of the factors that accelerate osteoarthritis and wear out our cartilage are beyond our control, like age and genetic predisposition. There are, thankfully, several factors we can control, like obesity, smoking, diet and exercise. 

Studies have shown that smoking significantly hastens the drying out of articular cartilage, leading to a more brittle joint and quicker development of osteoarthritis. Watching what you eat is also important. Several studies show that every one pound of body weight can increase the pressure on knee joints, creating seven times the force on those joints. Staying active lubricates your joints — and a healthy diet and lifestyle are also important.

What can be done to treat osteoarthritis?

If preventative steps aren’t helping enough, there are still nonoperative measures that can treat the pain and stiffness that can impact your quality of life. These include medications like acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen and naproxen.

While these can treat the symptoms, there are no medications yet to treat the progression of osteoarthritis, although some are being studied. Physical therapy can help with muscle strengthening and joint stretching. Injection therapy with corticosteroids or lubricants (gel) might also be recommended for some.

Dr. Vinay K. Aggarwal is a hip and knee reconstruction specialist in NYU Langone’s Department of Orthopedic Surgery.

The final option for severe osteoarthritis is surgery , which could be arthroscopic (minimally invasive) or take the form of a joint replacement , depending on the exact nature of your disease and the joint that is affected.  

While it’s a last resort for many, surgery can be incredibly effective and improve your quality of life. In fact, millions of Americans undergo hip and knee joint replacement yearly with fantastic success and high satisfaction. 

Before considering surgery, it’s important to choose a hospital and surgeon that you are comfortable with and have a reputation for success. The surgeon should be an expert in the body part where you need help — someone with the proper education and training who has all of the resources for a successful outcome.

This includes the full spectrum of your care: the anesthesiologist, rehabilitation services, nursing, social work and most of all, the track record of that team. In all of these areas, NYU Langone’s Orthopedic Surgery team offers the best option to help get you back to doing the things you love.

NYU Langone can help you  find an orthopedic specialist close to home, and the NYU Langone Orthopedic Second Opinion Service is available via an easy-to-complete online form. A second opinion can confirm your diagnosis and treatment plan, or provide a different recommendation that you can review and discuss with your doctor.

Vinay K. Aggarwal, MD , is assistant professor in the Division of Adult Reconstructive Surgery at NYU Langone’s Department of Orthopedic Surgery. He was drawn to orthopedics because it brought together his passion for medicine with his love of athletics and helping people enjoy a better quality of life. He specializes in hip and knee conditions and leads with a conservative approach to treatment before pursuing other options.

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can you visit nyc without vaccine

CDC plans to drop five-day covid isolation guidelines

can you visit nyc without vaccine

Americans who test positive for the coronavirus no longer need to routinely stay home from work and school for five days under new guidance planned by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency is loosening its covid isolation recommendations for the first time since 2021 to align it with guidance on how to avoid transmitting flu and RSV, according to four agency officials and an expert familiar with the discussions.

CDC officials acknowledged in internal discussions and in a briefing last week with state health officials how much the covid-19 landscape has changed since the virus emerged four years ago, killing nearly 1.2 million people in the United States and shuttering businesses and schools. The new reality — with most people having developed a level of immunity to the virus because of prior infection or vaccination — warrants a shift to a more practical approach, experts and health officials say.

“Public health has to be realistic,” said Michael T. Osterholm, an infectious-disease expert at the University of Minnesota. “In making recommendations to the public today, we have to try to get the most out of what people are willing to do. … You can be absolutely right in the science and yet accomplish nothing because no one will listen to you.”

The CDC plans to recommend that people who test positive for the coronavirus use clinical symptoms to determine when to end isolation. Under the new approach, people would no longer need to stay home if they have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without the aid of medication and their symptoms are mild and improving, according to three agency officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to share internal discussions.

Here is the current CDC guidance on isolation and precautions for people with covid-19

The federal recommendations follow similar moves by Oregon and California . The White House has yet to sign off on the guidance that the agency is expected to release in April for public feedback, officials said. One agency official said the timing could “move around a bit” until the guidance is finalized.

Work on revising isolation guidance has been underway since last August but was paused in the fall as covid cases rose. CDC director Mandy Cohen sent staff a memo in January that listed “Pan-resp guidance-April” as a bullet point for the agency’s 2024 priorities.

Officials said they recognized the need to give the public more practical guidelines for covid-19, acknowledging that few people are following isolation guidance that hasn’t been updated since December 2021. Back then, health officials cut the recommended isolation period for people with asymptomatic coronavirus from 10 days to five because they worried essential services would be hobbled as the highly transmissible omicron variant sent infections surging. The decision was hailed by business groups and slammed by some union leaders and health experts.

Covid is here to stay. How will we know when it stops being special?

The plan to further loosen isolation guidance when the science around infectiousness has not changed is likely to prompt strong negative reaction from vulnerable groups, including people older than 65, those with weak immune systems and long-covid patients, CDC officials and experts said.

Doing so “sweeps this serious illness under the rug,” said Lara Jirmanus, a clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School and a member of the People’s CDC, a coalition of health-care workers, scientists and advocates focused on reducing the harmful effects of covid-19.

Public health officials should treat covid differently from other respiratory viruses, she said, because it’s deadlier than the flu and increases the risk of developing long-term complications . As many as 7 percent of Americans report having suffered from a slew of lingering covid symptoms, including fatigue, difficulty breathing, brain fog, joint pain and ongoing loss of taste and smell, according to the CDC.

The new isolation recommendations would not apply to hospitals and other health-care settings with more vulnerable populations, CDC officials said.

While the coronavirus continues to cause serious illness, especially among the most vulnerable people, vaccines and effective treatments such as Paxlovid are available. The latest versions of coronavirus vaccines were 54 percent effective at preventing symptomatic infection in adults, according to data released Feb. 1, the first U.S. study to assess how well the shots work against the most recent coronavirus variant. But CDC data shows only 22 percent of adults and 12 percent of children had received the updated vaccine as of Feb. 9, despite data showing the vaccines provide robust protection against serious illness .

Coronavirus levels in wastewater i ndicate that symptomatic and asymptomatic infections remain high. About 20,000 people are still hospitalized — and about 2,300 are dying — every week, CDC data show. But the numbers are falling and are much lower than when deaths peaked in January 2021 when almost 26,000 people died of covid each week and about 115,000 were hospitalized.

The lower rates of hospitalizations were among the reasons California shortened its five-day isolation recommendation last month , urging people to stay home until they are fever-free for 24 hours and their symptoms are mild and improving. Oregon made a similar move last May.

California’s state epidemiologist Erica Pan said the societal disruptions that resulted from strict isolation guidelines also helped spur the change. Workers without sick leave and those who can’t work from home if they or their children test positive and are required to isolate bore a disproportionate burden. Strict isolation requirements can act as a disincentive to test when testing should be encouraged so people at risk for serious illness can get treatment, she said.

Giving people symptom-based guidance, similar to what is already recommended for flu, is a better way to prioritize those most at risk and balance the potential for disruptive impacts on schools and workplaces, Pan said. After Oregon made its change, the state has not experienced any disproportionate increases in community transmission or severity, according to data shared last month with the national association representing state health officials.

California still recommends people with covid wear masks indoors when they are around others for 10 days after testing positive — even if they have no symptoms — or becoming sick. “You may remove your mask sooner than 10 days if you have two sequential negative tests at least one day apart,” the California guidance states.

It’s not clear whether the updated CDC guidance will continue to recommend masking for 10 days.

Health officials from other states told the CDC last week that they are already moving toward isolation guidelines that would treat the coronavirus the same as flu and RSV, with additional precautions for people at high risk, said Anne Zink, an emergency room physician and Alaska’s chief medical officer.

Many other countries, including the United Kingdom, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Australia, made changes to isolation recommendations in 2022. Of 16 countries whose policies California officials reviewed, only Germany and Ireland still recommend isolation for five days, according to a presentation the California public health department gave health officials from other states in January. The Singapore ministry of health, in updated guidance late last year, said residents could “return to normal activities” once coronavirus symptoms resolve.

Even before the Biden administration ended the public health emergency last May, much of the public had moved on from covid-19, with many people having long given up testing and masking, much less isolating when they come down with covid symptoms.

Doctors say the best way for sick people to protect their communities is to mask or avoid unnecessary trips outside the home.

“You see a lot of people with symptoms — you don’t know if they have covid or influenza or RSV — but in all three of those cases, they probably shouldn’t be at Target, coughing, and looking sick,” said Eli Perencevich, an internal medicine professor at the University of Iowa.

Coronavirus: What you need to know

New covid variant: The United States is in the throes of another covid-19 uptick and coronavirus samples detected in wastewater suggests infections could be as rampant as they were last winter. JN.1, the new dominant variant , appears to be especially adept at infecting those who have been vaccinated or previously infected. Here’s how this covid surge compares with earlier spikes .

Covid ER visits rise: Covid-19, flu and RSV are rebounding in the United States ahead of the end-of-year holidays, with emergency room visits for the three respiratory viruses collectively reaching their highest levels since February.

New coronavirus booster: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that anyone 6 months or older get an updated coronavirus shot , but the vaccine rollout has seen some hiccups , especially for children . Here’s what you need to know about the new coronavirus vaccines , including when you should get it.

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Russia’s Advances on Space-Based Nuclear Weapon Draw U.S. Concerns

A congressman’s cryptic statement about new intelligence set Washington abuzz and infuriated White House officials.

President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia standing at a lectern wearing a dark suit.

By Julian E. Barnes ,  Karoun Demirjian ,  Eric Schmitt and David E. Sanger

Julian E. Barnes, Karoun Demirjian and Eric Schmitt reported from Washington, and David E. Sanger from Berlin.

The United States has informed Congress and its allies in Europe about Russian advances on a new, space-based nuclear weapon designed to threaten America’s extensive satellite network, according to current and former officials briefed on the matter.

Such a satellite-killing weapon, if deployed, could destroy civilian communications, surveillance from space and military command-and control operations by the United States and its allies. At the moment, the United States does not have the ability to counter such a weapon and defend its satellites, a former official said.

Officials said that the new intelligence, which they did not describe in detail, raised serious questions about whether Russia was preparing to abandon the Outer Space Treaty of 1967, which bans all orbital nuclear weapons. But since Russia does not appear close to deploying the weapon, they said, it is not considered an urgent threat.

The intelligence was made public, in part, in a cryptic announcement on Wednesday by Representative Michael R. Turner, Republican of Ohio and the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. He called on the Biden administration to declassify the information without saying specifically what it was.

ABC News reported earlier that the intelligence had to do with Russian space-based antisatellite nuclear weaponry. Current and former officials said that the launch of the antisatellite did not appear imminent, but that there was a limited window of time, which they did not define, to prevent its deployment.

Concerns about placing nuclear weapons in space go back 50 years. The United States experimented with versions of the technology but never deployed them. Russia has been developing its space-based capabilities for decades.

U.S. military officials have warned that both Russia and China are moving toward greater militarization of space, as all three superpowers work on ways to blind the others.

A report released last year, highlighted Russia’s development of weapons to blind other satellites but noted that Russia had refrained from using the full range of antisatellite capabilities it had developed.

Deploying a nuclear weapon in space would be a significant advancement in Russian technology and a potentially dramatic escalation. The Outer Space Treaty bans nuclear weapons in space, but Russia has been exiting many Cold War arms control treaties, seeing them as a restraint on its most important source of military power.

Mr. Turner’s statement, and his decision to share the information with others in Congress, set Washington abuzz on Wednesday about what the intelligence was.

But the statement infuriated White House officials, who feared the loss of important sources of information on Russia. While Mr. Turner has been an ally to the White House on Ukraine aid, his remarks on Wednesday became the latest flashpoint in strained relations between the Biden administration and congressional Republicans.

The intelligence was developed in recent days, and while it is important, officials said it was not a break-the-glass kind of warning of any imminent threat. But Mr. Turner urged its release.

“I am requesting that President Biden declassify all information relating to this threat so that Congress, the administration and our allies can openly discuss the actions necessary to respond to this threat,” Mr. Turner said.

His committee took the unorthodox move of voting on Monday to make the information available to all members of Congress — a step that alarmed some officials because it is not clear in what context, if any, the intelligence in the panel’s possession was presented. In a note to lawmakers, the House Intelligence Committee said the intelligence was about a “destabilizing foreign military capability.”

Capitol Hill is mired in a bitter political standoff over whether the United States should be mobilizing resources to counter Russian threats to Ukraine, a cause that most Democrats and some Republicans — including Mr. Turner — have maintained is essential to protecting U.S. national security interests. But a majority of Republican members of the House, including Speaker Mike Johnson, reject calls to put the Senate-passed foreign aid package with $60.1 billion for Ukraine to a vote on the House floor.

Former President Donald J. Trump has egged on Republican opposition, saying over the weekend that he would encourage Russia to “do whatever the hell they want” to any NATO country that had not spent enough money on its own defense.

Other officials said Mr. Turner was making more of the new intelligence than would ordinarily have been expected, perhaps to create pressure to prod the House to take up the supplemental funding request for Ukraine that the Senate passed this week.

That measure, providing military aid to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan, faces an uncertain prospect in the House. While many Republicans oppose additional funding, Mr. Turner is an outspoken advocate of more assistance to Ukraine and recently visited Kyiv, the capital.

Shortly after Mr. Turner’s announcement, Jake Sullivan, the national security adviser, entered the White House press room to discuss the importance of continued funding for Ukraine’s military.

But Mr. Sullivan declined to address a reporter’s question about the substance of Mr. Turner’s announcement, saying only that he was set to meet with the chairman on Thursday.

“We scheduled a briefing for the House members of the Gang of Eight tomorrow,” Mr. Sullivan said, referring to a group of congressional leaders from both parties. “That’s been on the books. So I am a bit surprised that Congressman Turner came out publicly today in advance of a meeting on the books for me to go sit with him alongside our intelligence and defense professionals tomorrow.”

Representative Jim Himes, Democrat of Connecticut and the ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, said that the issue was “serious” and that Mr. Turner was right to focus on it. But he added that the threat was “not going to ruin your Thursday.”

Senator Mark Warner, Democrat of Virginia, and Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, said in a joint statement that the Senate Intelligence Committee had been tracking the issue from the start and had been discussing a response with the Biden administration. But the lawmakers said that releasing information about the intelligence could expose the methods of collection.

At the White House, when Mr. Sullivan was asked whether he could tell Americans that there was nothing to worry about, he replied that it was “impossible to answer with a straight ‘yes.’”

“Americans understand that there are a range of threats and challenges in the world that we’re dealing with every single day, and those threats and challenges range from terrorism to state actors,” Mr. Sullivan said. “And we have to contend with them, and we have to contend with them in a way where we ensure the ultimate security of the American people. I am confident that President Biden, in the decisions that he is taking, is going to ensure the security of the American people going forward.”

Mr. Turner declined to respond to questions on Wednesday. Jason Crow, Democrat of Colorado, said the new intelligence was one of several “volatile threats” facing the United States.

“This is something that requires our attention,” Mr. Crow said. “There’s no doubt. It’s not an immediate crisis, but certainly something that we have to be very serious about.”

Mr. Johnson, apparently trying to spread calm after Mr. Turner’s announcement, said there was “no need for public alarm.”

“We are going to work together to address this matter,” he said.

The Outer Space Treaty was one of the first major arms control treaties negotiated between the United States and the Soviet Union, and one of the last remaining in place.

If Russia exited the space treaty, and let the New START treaty limiting strategic nuclear weapons expire in February 2026 — as seems likely — it could touch off a new arms race, of the kind not seen since the depths of the Cold War.

“Ending the Space Treaty could open the floodgates for other countries to put nuclear weapons in space as well,” said Steven Andreasen, a nuclear expert at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs in Minneapolis. “Once you have orbital nuclear weapons, you can use them for more than taking out satellites.”

Erica L. Green , Luke Broadwater and Glenn Thrush contributed reporting from Washington.

Julian E. Barnes covers the U.S. intelligence agencies and international security matters for The Times. He has written about security issues for more than two decades. More about Julian E. Barnes

Karoun Demirjian covers Congress with a focus on defense, foreign policy, intelligence, immigration, and trade and technology. More about Karoun Demirjian

Eric Schmitt is a national security correspondent for The Times, focusing on U.S. military affairs and counterterrorism issues overseas, topics he has reported on for more than three decades. More about Eric Schmitt

David E. Sanger covers the Biden administration and national security. He has been a Times journalist for more than four decades and has written several books on challenges to American national security. More about David E. Sanger

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