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fco travel advice niger

Foreign travel advice

Get advice about travelling abroad, including the latest information on coronavirus, safety and security, entry requirements and travel warnings.

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fco travel advice niger

Niger: Travel Advisory Raised to Level 4 – Do Not Travel

Office of the Spokesperson

August 2, 2023

Last Update: Reissued on August 2, 2023 to reflect the ordered departure of non-emergency U.S. government personnel and eligible family members.

U.S. citizens have previously been advised to reconsider travel to Niger due to crime, terrorism, and kidnapping.  On July 26, President Mohamed Bazoum was placed under house arrest amidst efforts to overthrow the democratically elected government of Niger.  Subsequent events have severely limited flight options.  Given this development, on August 2, 2023, the Department ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and eligible family members from Embassy Niamey.  The U.S. Embassy in Niamey has temporarily reduced its personnel, suspended routine services, and is only able to provide emergency assistance to U.S. citizens in Niger.

Country Summary:    With the ongoing efforts to overturn constitutional order, there may be increased demonstrations that can lead to civil unrest and government instability.  Violent crime, such as armed robbery, is common.

Terrorist groups continue plotting kidnappings and possible attacks in Niger.  Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreign and local government facilities and areas frequented by Westerners.  Terrorists operate in the areas bordering Mali, Libya, Burkina Faso, and throughout northern Niger.  Avoid travel to Niger’s border regions, particularly the Malian border area, Diffa region, and the Lake Chad region.  Mali-based extremist groups have crossed the border and conducted multiple lethal attacks on Nigerien security forces.

The U.S. Embassy has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Niger due to the temporary reduction in embassy staff.

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Niger.

If you decide to travel to Niger:

  • Exercise extreme care in all parts of the country.
  • Visitors are urged to stay in hotels with armed Nigerien security presence.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Make contingency plans to leave the country.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Niger.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest  Travel Health Information related to your travel.

U.S. Department of State

The lessons of 1989: freedom and our future.

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Niger Traveler View

Travel health notices, vaccines and medicines, non-vaccine-preventable diseases, stay healthy and safe.

  • Packing List

After Your Trip

Map - Niger

Be aware of current health issues in Niger. Learn how to protect yourself.

Level 2 Practice Enhanced Precautions

  • Global Polio January 05, 2024 Some international destinations have circulating poliovirus. Before any international travel, make sure you are up to date on your polio vaccines. Destination List: Afghanistan, Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Guinea, Indonesia, Israel, including the West Bank and Gaza, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Republic of the Congo, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, including Zanzibar, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
  • Diphtheria in Niger December 21, 2023 There is an outbreak of diphtheria in Niger. If you are traveling to an affected area, you should be up to date with your diphtheria vaccines.

Level 1 Practice Usual Precautions

  • Global Measles November 20, 2023 Many international destinations are reporting increased numbers of cases of measles. Destination List: Afghanistan, Angola, Armenia, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Qatar, Republic of South Sudan, Republic of the Congo, Romania, Senegal, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Togo, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

⇧ Top

Check the vaccines and medicines list and visit your doctor at least a month before your trip to get vaccines or medicines you may need. If you or your doctor need help finding a location that provides certain vaccines or medicines, visit the Find a Clinic page.

Routine vaccines

Recommendations.

Make sure you are up-to-date on all routine vaccines before every trip. Some of these vaccines include

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Flu (influenza)
  • Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)

Immunization schedules

All eligible travelers should be up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines. Please see  Your COVID-19 Vaccination  for more information. 

COVID-19 vaccine

Hepatitis A

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers one year old or older going to Niger.

Infants 6 to 11 months old should also be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. The dose does not count toward the routine 2-dose series.

Travelers allergic to a vaccine component or who are younger than 6 months should receive a single dose of immune globulin, which provides effective protection for up to 2 months depending on dosage given.

Unvaccinated travelers who are over 40 years old, immunocompromised, or have chronic medical conditions planning to depart to a risk area in less than 2 weeks should get the initial dose of vaccine and at the same appointment receive immune globulin.

Hepatitis A - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep A

Hepatitis B

Recommended for unvaccinated travelers of all ages traveling to Niger.

Hepatitis B - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Hep B

CDC recommends that travelers going to Niger take prescription medicine to prevent malaria. Depending on the medicine you take, you will need to start taking this medicine multiple days before your trip, as well as during and after your trip. Talk to your doctor about which malaria medication you should take.

Find  country-specific information  about malaria.

Malaria - CDC Yellow Book

Considerations when choosing a drug for malaria prophylaxis (CDC Yellow Book)

Malaria information for Niger.

Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series.

Measles (Rubeola) - CDC Yellow Book

Meningitis (Meningococcal disease)

Recommended for travelers 2 months old or older traveling to  areas of Niger  that are part of the meningitis belt during the dry season.

Meningococcal disease - CDC Yellow Book

Meningitis Belt Map

In Niger poliovirus has been identified in the past year.

Travelers to Niger are at increased risk of exposure to poliovirus.

Vaccine recommendations : Adults traveling to Niger who received a complete polio vaccination series as children may receive a single lifetime booster dose of inactivated polio vaccine; travelers who are unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated should receive a complete polio vaccination series before travel. Children who are not fully vaccinated will be considered for an  accelerated vaccination schedule .

Polio - CDC Yellow Book

Polio: For Travelers

Rabid dogs are commonly found in Niger. If you are bitten or scratched by a dog or other mammal while in Niger, there may be limited or no rabies treatment available. 

Consider rabies vaccination before your trip if your activities mean you will be around dogs or wildlife.

Travelers more likely to encounter rabid animals include

  • Campers, adventure travelers, or cave explorers (spelunkers)
  • Veterinarians, animal handlers, field biologists, or laboratory workers handling animal specimens
  • Visitors to rural areas

Since children are more likely to be bitten or scratched by a dog or other animals, consider rabies vaccination for children traveling to Niger. 

Rabies - CDC Yellow Book

Recommended for most travelers, especially those staying with friends or relatives or visiting smaller cities or rural areas.

Typhoid - CDC Yellow Book

Dosing info - Typhoid

Yellow Fever

Required for all arriving travelers ≥9 months old.

Recommended for travelers ≥9 months old going to areas south of the Sahara Desert. Not recommended for travel limited to areas in the Sahara Desert.

Yellow Fever - CDC Yellow Book

  • Avoid contaminated water

Leptospirosis

How most people get sick (most common modes of transmission)

  • Touching urine or other body fluids from an animal infected with leptospirosis
  • Swimming or wading in urine-contaminated fresh water, or contact with urine-contaminated mud
  • Drinking water or eating food contaminated with animal urine
  • Avoid contaminated water and soil

Clinical Guidance

Schistosomiasis

  • Wading, swimming, bathing, or washing in contaminated freshwater streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, or untreated pools.

Avoid bug bites

African tick-bite fever.

  • Avoid Bug Bites

African Tick-bite fever

Chikungunya

  • Mosquito bite
  • Mosquito bite

Leishmaniasis

  • Sand fly bite
  • An infected pregnant woman can spread it to her unborn baby

Airborne & droplet

  • Breathing in air or accidentally eating food contaminated with the urine, droppings, or saliva of infected rodents
  • Bite from an infected rodent
  • Less commonly, being around someone sick with hantavirus (only occurs with Andes virus)
  • Avoid rodents and areas where they live
  • Avoid sick people

Tuberculosis (TB)

  • Breathe in TB bacteria that is in the air from an infected and contagious person coughing, speaking, or singing.

Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Niger, so your behaviors are important.

Eat and drink safely

Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination. Standards may also differ within a country and risk may change depending on activity type (e.g., hiking versus business trip). You can learn more about safe food and drink choices when traveling by accessing the resources below.

  • Choose Safe Food and Drinks When Traveling
  • Water Treatment Options When Hiking, Camping or Traveling
  • Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene | Healthy Water
  • Avoid Contaminated Water During Travel

You can also visit the Department of State Country Information Pages for additional information about food and water safety.

Prevent bug bites

Bugs (like mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas) can spread a number of diseases in Niger. Many of these diseases cannot be prevented with a vaccine or medicine. You can reduce your risk by taking steps to prevent bug bites.

What can I do to prevent bug bites?

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
  • Use an appropriate insect repellent (see below).
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
  • Stay and sleep in air-conditioned or screened rooms.
  • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

What type of insect repellent should I use?

  • FOR PROTECTION AGAINST TICKS AND MOSQUITOES: Use a repellent that contains 20% or more DEET for protection that lasts up to several hours.
  • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin)
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or para-menthane-diol (PMD)
  • 2-undecanone
  • Always use insect repellent as directed.

What should I do if I am bitten by bugs?

  • Avoid scratching bug bites, and apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to reduce the itching.
  • Check your entire body for ticks after outdoor activity. Be sure to remove ticks properly.

What can I do to avoid bed bugs?

Although bed bugs do not carry disease, they are an annoyance. See our information page about avoiding bug bites for some easy tips to avoid them. For more information on bed bugs, see Bed Bugs .

For more detailed information on avoiding bug bites, see Avoid Bug Bites .

Stay safe outdoors

If your travel plans in Niger include outdoor activities, take these steps to stay safe and healthy during your trip.

  • Stay alert to changing weather conditions and adjust your plans if conditions become unsafe.
  • Prepare for activities by wearing the right clothes and packing protective items, such as bug spray, sunscreen, and a basic first aid kit.
  • Consider learning basic first aid and CPR before travel. Bring a travel health kit with items appropriate for your activities.
  • If you are outside for many hours in heat, eat salty snacks and drink water to stay hydrated and replace salt lost through sweating.
  • Protect yourself from UV radiation : use sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15, wear protective clothing, and seek shade during the hottest time of day (10 a.m.–4 p.m.).
  • Be especially careful during summer months and at high elevation. Because sunlight reflects off snow, sand, and water, sun exposure may be increased during activities like skiing, swimming, and sailing.
  • Very cold temperatures can be dangerous. Dress in layers and cover heads, hands, and feet properly if you are visiting a cold location.

Stay safe around water

  • Swim only in designated swimming areas. Obey lifeguards and warning flags on beaches.
  • Practice safe boating—follow all boating safety laws, do not drink alcohol if driving a boat, and always wear a life jacket.
  • Do not dive into shallow water.
  • Do not swim in freshwater in developing areas or where sanitation is poor.
  • Avoid swallowing water when swimming. Untreated water can carry germs that make you sick.
  • To prevent infections, wear shoes on beaches where there may be animal waste.

Schistosomiasis, a parasitic infection that can be spread in fresh water, is found in Niger. Avoid swimming in fresh, unchlorinated water, such as lakes, ponds, or rivers.

Keep away from animals

Most animals avoid people, but they may attack if they feel threatened, are protecting their young or territory, or if they are injured or ill. Animal bites and scratches can lead to serious diseases such as rabies.

Follow these tips to protect yourself:

  • Do not touch or feed any animals you do not know.
  • Do not allow animals to lick open wounds, and do not get animal saliva in your eyes or mouth.
  • Avoid rodents and their urine and feces.
  • Traveling pets should be supervised closely and not allowed to come in contact with local animals.
  • If you wake in a room with a bat, seek medical care immediately. Bat bites may be hard to see.

All animals can pose a threat, but be extra careful around dogs, bats, monkeys, sea animals such as jellyfish, and snakes. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, immediately:

  • Wash the wound with soap and clean water.
  • Go to a doctor right away.
  • Tell your doctor about your injury when you get back to the United States.

Consider buying medical evacuation insurance. Rabies is a deadly disease that must be treated quickly, and treatment may not be available in some countries.

Reduce your exposure to germs

Follow these tips to avoid getting sick or spreading illness to others while traveling:

  • Wash your hands often, especially before eating.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home or in your hotel room, unless you need medical care.

Avoid sharing body fluids

Diseases can be spread through body fluids, such as saliva, blood, vomit, and semen.

Protect yourself:

  • Use latex condoms correctly.
  • Do not inject drugs.
  • Limit alcohol consumption. People take more risks when intoxicated.
  • Do not share needles or any devices that can break the skin. That includes needles for tattoos, piercings, and acupuncture.
  • If you receive medical or dental care, make sure the equipment is disinfected or sanitized.

Know how to get medical care while traveling

Plan for how you will get health care during your trip, should the need arise:

  • Carry a list of local doctors and hospitals at your destination.
  • Review your health insurance plan to determine what medical services it would cover during your trip. Consider purchasing travel health and medical evacuation insurance.
  • Carry a card that identifies, in the local language, your blood type, chronic conditions or serious allergies, and the generic names of any medications you take.
  • Some prescription drugs may be illegal in other countries. Call Niger’s embassy to verify that all of your prescription(s) are legal to bring with you.
  • Bring all the medicines (including over-the-counter medicines) you think you might need during your trip, including extra in case of travel delays. Ask your doctor to help you get prescriptions filled early if you need to.

Many foreign hospitals and clinics are accredited by the Joint Commission International. A list of accredited facilities is available at their website ( www.jointcommissioninternational.org ).

In some countries, medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) may be substandard or counterfeit. Bring the medicines you will need from the United States to avoid having to buy them at your destination.

Malaria is a risk in Niger. Fill your malaria prescription before you leave and take enough with you for the entire length of your trip. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking the pills; some need to be started before you leave.

Select safe transportation

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.

Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Niger may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Niger, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver's license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy's international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.

Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

Maintain personal security

Use the same common sense traveling overseas that you would at home, and always stay alert and aware of your surroundings.

Before you leave

  • Research your destination(s), including local laws, customs, and culture.
  • Monitor travel advisories and alerts and read travel tips from the US Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) .
  • Leave a copy of your itinerary, contact information, credit cards, and passport with someone at home.
  • Pack as light as possible, and leave at home any item you could not replace.

While at your destination(s)

  • Carry contact information for the nearest US embassy or consulate .
  • Carry a photocopy of your passport and entry stamp; leave the actual passport securely in your hotel.
  • Follow all local laws and social customs.
  • Do not wear expensive clothing or jewelry.
  • Always keep hotel doors locked, and store valuables in secure areas.
  • If possible, choose hotel rooms between the 2nd and 6th floors.

Healthy Travel Packing List

Use the Healthy Travel Packing List for Niger for a list of health-related items to consider packing for your trip. Talk to your doctor about which items are most important for you.

Why does CDC recommend packing these health-related items?

It’s best to be prepared to prevent and treat common illnesses and injuries. Some supplies and medicines may be difficult to find at your destination, may have different names, or may have different ingredients than what you normally use.

If you are not feeling well after your trip, you may need to see a doctor. If you need help finding a travel medicine specialist, see Find a Clinic . Be sure to tell your doctor about your travel, including where you went and what you did on your trip. Also tell your doctor if you were bitten or scratched by an animal while traveling.

If your doctor prescribed antimalarial medicine for your trip, keep taking the rest of your pills after you return home. If you stop taking your medicine too soon, you could still get sick.

Malaria is always a serious disease and may be a deadly illness. If you become ill with a fever either while traveling in a malaria-risk area or after you return home (for up to 1 year), you should seek immediate medical attention and should tell the doctor about your travel history.

For more information on what to do if you are sick after your trip, see Getting Sick after Travel .

Map Disclaimer - The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on maps do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement are generally marked.

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Niger (Africa)

Advice for all destinations.

Read the information on the COVID-19: Health Considerations for Travel page for advice on travelling during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vaccinations and malaria risk

Review both the Vaccination and Malaria sections on this page to find out if you may need vaccines and/or a malaria risk assessment before you travel to this country.

If you think you require vaccines and/or malaria risk assessment, you should make an appointment with a travel health professional:

  • How to make an appointment with a travel health professional

A travel health risk assessment is also advisable for some people, even when vaccines or malaria tablets are not required.

  • Do I need a travel health risk assessment?

Risk prevention advice 

Many of the health risks experienced by travellers cannot be prevented by vaccines and other measures need to be taken.

Always make sure you understand the wider risks at your destination and take precautions, including:

  • food and water safety
  • accident prevention
  • avoiding insect bites
  • preventing and treating animal bites
  • respiratory hygiene
  • hand hygiene

Our advice section gives detailed information on minimising specific health risks abroad:

  • Travel Health Advice A-Z

Other health considerations

Make sure you have travel insurance before travel to cover healthcare abroad.

Find out if there are any restrictions you need to consider if you are travelling with medicines .

Know how to access healthcare at your destination: see the GOV.UK English speaking doctors and medical facilities: worldwide list

If you feel unwell on your return home from travelling abroad, always seek advice from a healthcare professional and let them know your travel history.

Vaccinations

  • Confirm primary courses and boosters are up to date as recommended for life in Britain - including for example, seasonal flu vaccine (if indicated), MMR , vaccines required for occupational risk of exposure, lifestyle risks and underlying medical conditions.
  • Courses or boosters usually advised: Diphtheria; Hepatitis A; Poliomyelitis; Tetanus; Yellow Fever.
  • Other vaccines to consider: Hepatitis B; Meningococcal Meningitis; Rabies; Typhoid.
  • Selectively advised vaccines - only for those individuals at highest risk: Cholera.

Yellow fever vaccination certificate required for all travellers aged 9 months or over. 

Notes on the diseases mentioned above

Risk is higher during floods and after natural disasters, in areas with very poor sanitation and lack of clean drinking water.

  • Diphtheria :  spread person to person through respiratory droplets. Risk is higher if mixing with locals in poor, overcrowded living conditions.

Risk is higher where personal hygiene and sanitation is poor.

Risk is higher for long stays, frequent travel and for children (exposed through cuts and scratches), those who may require medical treatment during travel.

  • Meningococcal Meningitis :  spread by droplet infection through close person to person contact. Meningococcal disease is found worldwide but epidemics may occur within this country, particularly during the dry season. Risk is higher for those mixing with locals for extended periods.
  • Tetanus :  spread through contamination of cuts, burns and wounds with tetanus spores. Spores are found in soil worldwide. A total of 5 doses of tetanus vaccine are recommended for life in the UK. Boosters are usually recommended in a country or situation where the correct treatment of an injury may not be readily available.
  • Typhoid :  spread mainly through consumption of contaminated food and drink. Risk is higher where access to adequate sanitation and safe water is limited.
  • Yellow Fever :  spread by the bite of an infected, day-biting mosquito. The disease is mainly found in rural areas of affected countries but outbreaks in urban areas do occur. Vaccination is usually recommended for all those who travel into risk areas. (View yellow fever risk areas here), and areas where there is an outbreak ongoing (check the 'news' section for outbreaks). In addition, certain countries may want to see proof of vaccination on an official yellow fever vaccination certificate - check above under Immunisations .

Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease transmitted by mosquitoes.You cannot be vaccinated against malaria.

Malaria precautions

  • Malaria risk is high throughout the year in all areas,.
  • Malaria precautions are essential. Avoid mosquito bites by covering up with clothing such as long sleeves and long trousers especially after sunset, using insect repellents on exposed skin and, when necessary, sleeping under a mosquito net.
  • Check with your doctor or nurse about suitable antimalarial tablets.
  • See malaria map – additional information can be found by clicking on the Regional Information icon below the map.
  • High risk areas: atovaquone/proguanil OR doxycycline OR mefloquine is usually advised.
  • If you have been travelling in a malarious area and develop a fever seek medical attention promptly. Remember malaria can develop even up to one year after exposure.
  • If travelling to an area remote from medical facilities, carrying standby emergency treatment for malaria may be considered.

Other Health Risks

Schistosomiasis.

There is a risk of exposure to coronavirus (COVID-19) in this country.

Please be aware that the risk of COVID-19 in this country may change at short notice and also consider your risk of exposure in any transit countries and from travelling itself. 

  • The 'News' section on this page will advise if significant case increases or outbreaks have occurred in this country.

Prior to travel, you should:

  • Check the latest government guidance on the FCDO Foreign travel advice and country specific pages for travel to this country and the rules for entering the UK on return.
  • Ensure you are up to date with UK recommendations on COVID-19 vaccination.
  • You can check this in the FAQ's.
  • If you are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 you should carefully  consider your travel plans  and consider seeking medical advice prior to making any decisions.

For further information, see  Coronavirus disease (COVID-19)  and  COVID-19: Health Considerations for Travel  pages.

Polio Vaccination Exit Recommendations

If you are visiting this country for longer than 4 weeks, you may be advised to have a booster dose of a polio-containing vaccine if you have not had one in the past 12 months. You should carry proof of having had this vaccination. Please speak to a travel health professional to discuss.

  • 08 Jan 2024 - Dengue in Africa
  • 59 additional items in the news archive for this country

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Niger - Pirogue on the Niger river, Niger, Africa

Introducing Niger

About niger.

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  • History, language & culture
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Plan your trip

  • Travel to Niger
  • Where to stay

While you’re there

  • Things to see & do
  • Shopping & nightlife
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Before you go

  • Passport & visa
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Book your flights

Niger travel guide

One of the world’s poorest nations, Niger might be a challenging destination to travel around, but rewards abound for those willing to persevere. And with political stability returning to this West African nation, it is slowly opening up to tourists.

A country shaped by Saharan trade routes, visitors came and went through this land for centuries, leaving behind them a wonderful fusion of Arab and African traditions.

Agadez and Zinder sprung up along these now defunct routes and today these cities retain their ancient mercantile charm. Comprised of beautiful adobe dwellings, their labyrinthine streets are home to bustling markets, which sell pottery, leather and other decorative pieces. Zinder is also renowned for its extravagant Ramadan festival, during which horsemen can be seen riding through the streets in the most flamboyant fashion.

Unlike Agadez and Zinder, Niger’s capital, Niamey, was never a site of trans-Saharan trade, and remained relatively unimportant until the 20th century. It continues to be possibly the least-hurried and most relaxed capital in the region. Situated on the lush banks of the Niger River, from which the country takes its name, Niamey is the commercial centre and a great place to delve into local life.

Niger’s biggest cultural event, however, occurs out in the desert town of Ingall. At the end of the rainy season the town’s population of 500 swells to several thousand as Tuareg and Wodaabe nomads attend the annual Cure Salée festival. The centrepiece is the Wodaabe gerewol, during which unmarried men adopt extravagant makeup and sing rhythmic chants in the hope of impressing a future bride.

Naturalists are also well catered for in Niger, which is home to a number of national parks, most famously W Regional Park, a haven for lions, leopards, elephants, baboons and much more. Ultimately, though, it’s Niger’s ancient cities, time-honoured festivals and nomadic culture that make this friendly country so beguiling.

1,267,000 sq km (489,191 sq miles).

20,715,285 (UN estimate 2016).

14.2 per sq km.

President Mohamed Bazoum since 2021 was removed in a military coup in July 2023. General Abdourahmane Tchiani is head of the new National Council for Safeguarding the Fatherland, since July 2023.

Prime Minister Ali Lamine Zène since 2023.

Travel Advice

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office ( FCDO ) provides advice about risks of travel to help British nationals make informed decisions. Find out more about FCDO travel advice .

FCDO advises against all travel to Niger

Your travel insurance could be invalidated if you travel against FCDO advice.

FCDO advises against all travel to Niger, including the capital city of Niamey, for security reasons.

Security situation in Niger

There has been a military takeover in Niger, which has led to protests and unrest.

These protests may be violent and the security situation could change quickly without warning.

Travel within or out of Niger is at your own risk. The  FCDO  cannot offer advice on the safety of travelling to any departure point within Niger. 

Nigerien airspace has reopened, however there could be disruptions to commercial flights from Niamey’s Diori International Airport at short notice.

Find out more about why FCDO advises against travel .  

British Embassy in Niger

The British Embassy in Niamey does not offer consular assistance. Consular support is provided from the British Embassy in Lagos, Nigeria. They cannot provide in-person assistance.

Help and support  

If you are a British national in Niger and need assistance, contact  FCDO ’s 24-7 services in Lagos by telephone on +234 (1) 277 0782 and select option 2 for consular services for British nationals.

If you are in the UK and worried about a British person in Niger, you can call  FCDO  in London 24-7 on 020 7008 5000.

Before you travel

No travel can be guaranteed safe. Read all the advice in this guide and any specific travel advice that applies to you:

  • women travellers
  • disabled travellers

LGBT+ travellers

Follow and contact FCDO travel on Twitter , Facebook and Instagram . You can also sign up to get email notifications when this advice is updated.

Travel insurance

If you choose to travel, research your destinations and get appropriate travel insurance . Insurance should cover your itinerary, planned activities and expenses in an emergency.

This advice reflects the UK government’s understanding of current rules for people travelling on a full ‘British citizen’ passport from the UK, for the most common types of travel.

The authorities in Niger set and enforce entry rules. If you’re not sure how these requirements apply to you, contact the Niger Consulate in the UK .

COVID-19 rules

There are no COVID-19 testing or vaccination requirements for travellers entering Niger. 

Passport validity requirements

Your passport should be valid for the proposed duration of your stay. No additional period of validity is needed.

Check with your travel provider that your passport and other travel documents meet requirements. Renew your passport if you need to.

You will be denied entry if you do not have a valid travel document or try to use a passport that has been reported lost or stolen.

Visa requirements

You will need a visa to enter Niger. You can apply for a visa from the Nigerien Consulate in Milton Keynes.

Visit the  consulate’s website  for application forms, payment, and more information on requirements.

Vaccination requirements

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the vaccinations and certificates you need in TravelHealthPro’s Niger guide .

All arrivals in Niger require a yellow fever vaccination certificate.

Customs rules

There are strict rules about goods you can take into or out of Niger. You must declare anything that may be prohibited or subject to tax or duty.

Niger is a cash-based society. Credit cards are rarely accepted even in hotels and restaurants visited by international clients. There are few ATMs. Banks accept travellers cheques. You will have to produce your passport and the receipt for the cheques from the issuing bank.

You should also read FCDO ’s overall travel advice and safety advice for regions of Niger .

There is a high threat of terrorist attacks globally affecting UK interests and British nationals, including from groups and individuals who view the UK and British nationals as targets. Stay aware of your surroundings at all times.    

UK Counter Terrorism Policing has information and advice on staying safe abroad and what to do in the event of a terrorist attack. Find out how to reduce your risk from terrorism while abroad .

Terrorism in Niger

Terrorists are very likely to try and carry out attacks in Niger.

There is a heightened risk of attack in Niamey. Attacks could be indiscriminate and occur without warning, including in places visited by foreigners. You should be especially vigilant and where possible avoid places frequented by foreigners, such as: 

  • diplomatic premises
  • conference centres
  • locations popular with tourists and foreigners
  • sporting and cultural events
  • shopping centres
  • transport hubs
  • religious sites and places of worship, particularly churches
  • national parks and nature reserves; including the Parc du W
  • foreign, national or local government buildings
  • large crowds

There may be a heightened risk of attack during election periods and religious festivals including the month of Ramadan.

You should be vigilant, monitor announcements and local media, and follow the advice of local authorities.

There have been multiple recent attacks in Niger, particularly in the Diffa and Tillabéri regions. Notable recent attacks include:

  • on 2 October 2023, terrorists killed around 30 soldiers in Takanamat, Tahoua
  • on 30 September 2023, terrorists killed 33 soldiers in Imbalagan, Tillaberi
  • on 16 August 2023, terrorists killed 30 civilians in the Kandadji region, Tillaberi
  • on 1 February 2023, terrorists killed 18 people in an attack on a refugee camp in Tillia, Tahoua
  • in 2022, an IED explosion took place in Bougoum (approximately 5km from Niamey city limits) killing 2 civilians
  • in 2022, a Gendarme Post in Bougoum was attacked by armed individuals on motorbikes

Terrorist kidnap

British nationals are seen as legitimate targets, including tourists, humanitarian aid workers, journalists and business travellers. If you are kidnapped, the reason for your presence is unlikely to protect you or secure your safe release. 

The long-standing policy of the British government is not to make substantive concessions to hostage takers. The British government considers that paying ransoms and releasing prisoners builds the capability of terrorist groups and finances their activities. This can, in turn, increase the risk of further hostage-taking. The Terrorism Act (2000) makes payments to terrorists illegal. 

There’s a very high threat of kidnapping by AQ-affiliated and other regional Islamist groups. These include Jamaat Nusrat al-Islam wal Muslimeen (JNIM) and Islamic State Greater Sahara (ISGS), who operate throughout Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso; and Islamic State West Africa (ISWA) and Boko Haram who operate in the Lake Chad Basin. Criminal groups also carry out kidnaps.

Westerners have been kidnapped in Niger and the wider Sahel region, including in Niamey and the north and west of Niger. In October 2020 an American was kidnapped (and rescued shortly after) in Massalata near the border with Nigeria. In September 2018, a Catholic priest was kidnapped in Makolondi, 125km south-west of Niamey. An aid worker was kidnapped in the Tillabéri region of Niger in April 2018.

If you’re working or travelling in Niger, you should be aware of the risk of terrorist kidnapping. You should maintain a high level of vigilance at all times, including when travelling. You should be particularly vigilant when walking (in Niamey, you should not cross the bridges over the River Niger on foot at any time), in crowded public places, including camps for displaced people, religious gatherings and insecure spaces like places of worship, markets, shopping malls, hotels, bars, night clubs, restaurants, nature reserves and national parks, and transport hubs. You should make sure you have carefully considered the threat and have reasonable, proportionate mitigation measures in place.

Political situation

On 26 July, the Conseil National pour la Sauvegarde de la Patrie (CNSP) launched a military coup which has led to protests and unrest.

The President of Niger, His Excellency Mohamed Bazoum of the PNDS political party, has been detained since 26 July.

Protests, marches and demonstrations can occur with little prior notice and can be violent. If you become aware of any protests, marches or demonstrations, you should move away from the area immediately, as the atmosphere can change quickly and without warning.

Levels of crime, especially in the capital Niamey, are high. Thefts, robberies and residential break-ins can occur at any time. Take sensible precautions to keep important items like money, passports, jewellery and mobile phones safe.

The areas around the Gaweye Hotel, National Museum and Petit Marché in Niamey are particularly prone to muggings. Avoid walking alone there, and do not cross the bridges over the River Niger on foot at any time. Be vigilant when walking anywhere in the city. Walking at night is more dangerous as there’s a lack of street lighting.

There have been attacks on people, including westerners, as they are leaving banks and ATMs. Be careful when using ATMs on the street, never do this at night-time, and if possible use the ATMs available in most large hotels. 

Car thieves often target 4-wheel-drive vehicles. Make sure car doors are locked at all times.

Banditry, smuggling and other criminal activity is common in border areas (particularly Maradi, Tillabéri and Diffa). You should take special care and avoid crossing borders after dark.

There have also been hold-ups and robberies on public buses between Tahoua and Agadez and between Agadez and Arlit. In some cases people have been killed.

British nationals are increasingly being targeted by internet and other scams. The scams come in many forms – romance and friendship, business ventures, or work and employment opportunities. Victims are at great financial risk.

Laws and cultural differences

Niger is a Muslim country. Respect local traditions, customs, laws and religions at all times. Be aware of your actions and dress in case they offend, especially during the month of Ramadan or if you visit religious areas.

If you commit a crime you will be subject to local law. Local prison conditions are harsh.

Personal ID

You should carry identification at all times. This would normally be your passport or residence permit. If you drive outside the main towns, authorities are very likely to ask you to produce identification.

Ramadan is a holy month for Muslims. The dates vary by year and country. In 2024 Ramadan in Niger is expected to be from 11 March to 9 April. During this time, do not:

  • eat, drink, smoke or chew gum in public in the daytime
  • play loud music or dance
  • swear in public

Get more advice when you arrive from your tour guide, hotel or business contacts.    

Using cameras in secure areas

Do not photograph military or government installations.

There is no law criminalising same-sex sexual activity in Niger. However, there are laws under the Penal Code of 1993 covering ‘public outrage against modesty’ and ‘immodest or unnatural acts’. An ‘unnatural act’ with a person of the same sex who is under the age of 21 can be punishable by a fine of up to 100,000 francs and up to 3 years imprisonment. Although we are not aware of any prosecutions under this legislation, attitudes within society towards LGBT+ people can be discriminatory.

There are no laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and no legal recognition of same-sex couples.

Read more advice for LGBT+ travellers .

Transport risks

FCDO continues to advise against all travel to Niger. Travel within or out of Niger is at your own risk. The  FCDO  cannot offer advice on the safety of travelling to any departure point within Niger.

Road travel

If you are planning to drive in Niger, see information on driving abroad .

You can drive in Niger using a  1968 International Driving Permit ( IDP )  for up to 3 months. If you’re staying longer than 3 months, you will need to get a Nigerien licence.

You cannot buy an IDP outside the UK, so get one before you travel. You can buy an IDP in person from some UK post offices – find your nearest post office branch that offers this service.

Carry your UK driving licence and car registration documents with you at all times.

Road safety

The main roads between Niamey and other large towns are generally satisfactory by African standards, but some roads are pot-holed, conditions are often worse during and just after rainy season. Driving standards are poor. Vehicles often drive without lights at night and there is little street lighting.

Travel around Niger can be difficult, and conditions are poor for overland travel. Avoid travelling between towns at night.

Aim to use local travel agents and guides when travelling outside main towns and in desert areas. An approved local travel agent can arrange all the necessary permits for your journey and give details of your itinerary to the local authorities. Travel in convoy and carry an independent satellite phone. Make sure you have a supply of drinking water and food.

There have been reports of landmines being used in Burkina Faso on the road between Ouagadougou and Niamey. Seek local advice before making this journey.

In the case of an accident, you should go immediately to the nearest police station to file a report. Crowds can gather quickly and you may be vulnerable if you remain at the scene. Medical help in the event of an accident is likely to be limited.

Public transport

Avoid using buses or taxis where possible.

Buses operate on routes between Niamey and other large towns, but distances are long and buses are prone to mechanical failure. There have also been hold-ups and robberies on public buses. See ‘Crime’.

Taxis are available, but are often in poor mechanical condition. Driving standards are poor.

Air space has now re-opened, although flight options may be more limited and could change at short notice. Check with your travel company or airline for the latest information. 

Flights within Niger remain limited.

Extreme weather and natural disasters

Find out what you can do to prepare for and respond to extreme weather and natural hazards . 

Floods and landslides

The rainy season in Niger is from June to October. Torrential rains can cause floods and landslides. Monitor local weather reports and expect difficulties when travelling to affected areas.

This section has safety advice for regions of Niger. It only covers regions where FCDO has specific advice.

You should also read FCDO ’s overall travel advice and safety and security advice .

Northern and eastern Niger

Local authorities are extremely sensitive about foreigners travelling out of Tahoua to other parts of Niger in the east and the north.

These roads in northern Niger are permanently closed to tourists, except with special authorisation:

  • Chirfa (Djado) / Djanet (Algeria)
  • Achouloma (north Djado) / Salvador Pass (Libya)
  • Adrar Bous (north Aïr) / Djanet (Algeria)
  • Adrar Bous (north Aïr) / In Azawa (Algeria)
  • Agadez / Arlit / Iferouane
  • Agadez / Tahoua

The MNJ armed group has launched attacks in the north including the use of landmines, and Islamist terrorist groups have previously launched attacks in Agadez, Arlit and against a prison in Niamey. Attacks against tourists are known to take place at El Meki between Agadez and Timia. The Aïr and Ténéré regions are particularly prone to attacks.

An official curfew has been implemented by the authorities in the whole of the Diffa region since 2014. Since 2019 this has prohibited the movement of motorised vehicles from 8pm to 6am. There is also a general curfew from 10pm to 6am.

Western Niger

A state of emergency has been in place in the urban municipality of Tillabéri since 2019. The movement of motorbikes and cars is banned from 7pm to 6am, and the movement of pedestrians is banned from 10pm to 6am. Public meetings are banned, unless expressly permitted by the authorities. Defence and security forces are authorised to carry out searches, and to check IDs, both day and night.

Following an attack in 2020 which killed 6 French nationals and 2 Nigeriens in Kouré, Tillabéri, a state of emergency is in place for the whole of Tillabéri apart from Niamey.

A state of emergency has also been in place in Ouallam, Ayorou, Bankilare, Abala and Banibongou (Tillabéri region) and Tassara and Tillia (Tahoua region) since 2017.

Southern Niger

A state of emergency is in place in the states of Borno and Yobe in Nigeria, which border Niger. The border areas of the Maradi region are increasingly prone to banditry. Kidnap for ransom and robberies are commonplace.

In 2020 an American was kidnapped (and later rescued in a US military operation in Nigeria) in Massalata near the border with Nigeria.

Before you travel check that:

  • your destination can provide the healthcare you may need
  • you have appropriate travel insurance for local treatment or unexpected medical evacuation

This is particularly important if you have a health condition or are pregnant.

Emergency medical number

Call 15 and ask for an ambulance.

Public emergency services can be slow to respond. Some private medical clinics also have ambulance services.

Contact your insurance company promptly if you’re referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Vaccinations and health risks

At least 8 weeks before your trip check:

  • the latest information on vaccination recommendations and health risks in TravelHealthPro’s Niger guide
  • where to get vaccines and whether you have to pay on the NHS travel vaccinations page

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or bought in the UK can be different in other countries.

Read best practice when travelling with medicines on TravelHealthPro .

The NHS has information on whether you can take your medicine abroad .

Healthcare facilities in Niger

Medical facilities are poor, even in Niamey. Serious medical treatment would require evacuation to Europe. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation.

Private hospitals and clinics include:

  • Polyclinic Magori (+227 2074 1291, or +227 2074 3347 in an emergency)
  • Clinique Gamkalley (+227 9696 4886, or +227 2073 4639 in an emergency)

Travel and mental health

Read FCDO guidance on travel and mental health . There is also mental health guidance on TravelHealthPro .

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office ( FCDO ) cannot provide tailored advice for individual trips. Read this travel advice and carry out your own research before deciding whether to travel.

Emergency services in Niger

Ambulance: 15

Police: 17  

Contact your travel provider and insurer

Contact your travel provider and your insurer if you are involved in a serious incident or emergency abroad. They will tell you if they can help and what you need to do.

Refunds and changes to travel

For refunds or changes to travel, contact your travel provider. You may also be able to make a claim through insurance. However, insurers usually require you to talk to your travel provider first.

Find out more about changing or cancelling travel plans , including:

  • where to get advice if you are in a dispute with a provider
  • how to access previous versions of travel advice to support a claim

Support from FCDO

FCDO has guidance on staying safe and what to do if you need help or support abroad, including:

  • finding English-speaking  lawyers
  • dealing with a  death abroad
  • getting help if you’re a  victim of crime
  • what to do if you’re  in hospital
  • if you’re affected by a crisis , such as a terrorist attack

Contacting FCDO

Follow and contact FCDO travel on Twitter , Facebook and Instagram . You can also sign up to get email notifications when this travel advice is updated.

You can also contact FCDO online .

Help abroad in an emergency

If you’re in Niger and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the British Consulate in Lagos who provide consular assistance for Niger.

FCDO in London

You can call FCDO in London if you need urgent help because something has happened to a friend or relative abroad.

Telephone: 020 7008 5000 (24 hours)

Find out about call charges

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Travel safely to Niger with Passport Health's travel vaccinations and advice.

Travel Vaccines and Advice for Niger

Passport Health offers a variety of options for travellers throughout the world.

Niger is small West African country, and one of the poorest countries in the world.

Niamey, the capital of Niger, is located along the Niger river. It is known for its markets and museums, including the National Museum of Niger, that boasts an impressive collection of dinosaur fossils and historic artifacts.

The city is also home to thousands of fruit bats, a sight that draws tourists to the Place de la République every evening to watch them fly by.

While it is possible to travel to Niger, because of the operation of several terrorist organisations such as the Islamic State within the country, precautions should be taken to ensure the safety of all visitors.

Do I Need Vaccines for Niger?

Yes, some vaccines are recommended or required for Niger. The National Travel Health Network and Centre and WHO recommend the following vaccinations for Niger: COVID-19 , hepatitis A , hepatitis B , typhoid , cholera , yellow fever , rabies , meningitis , polio and tetanus .

See the bullets below to learn more about some of these key immunisations:

  • COVID-19 – Airborne – Recommended for all travellers
  • Hepatitis A – Food & Water – Recommended for most travellers to the region, especially if unvaccinated.
  • Hepatitis B – Blood & Body Fluids – Recommended for travellers to most regions.
  • Tetanus – Wounds or Breaks in Skin – Recommended for travelers to most regions, especially if not previously vaccinated.
  • Typhoid – Food & Water – Jab lasts 3 years. Oral vaccine lasts 5 years, must be able to swallow pills. Oral doses must be kept in refrigerator.
  • Cholera – Food & Water – Recommended for travel to most regions.
  • Yellow Fever – Mosquito – Required for arriving travellers from ALL countries. Recommended for all travellers over 9 months of age travelling south of the Sahara.
  • Rabies – Saliva of Infected Animals – High risk country. Vaccine recommended for long-stay travellers and those who may come in contact with animals.
  • Meningitis – Airborne & Direct Contact – Located in the meningitis belt, vaccination is recommended during the dry season (Dec. – June)
  • Polio – Food & Water – Recommended for some travellers to this region. Single adult booster recommended.

See the tables below for more information:

Proof of yellow fever vaccination is required to enter Niger. If you have not received the vaccine before arrival, you may be given it at your port of entry and put in quarantine.

To find out more about these vaccines, see our vaccinations page . Ready to travel safely? Book your appointment either ring or start booking online now .

Do I Need a Visa or Passport for Niger?

Visas are required for all trips to Niger. Passports must be valid for the duration of your stay, at a minimum. Proof of yellow fever vaccination is required to enter the country. If you do not have proof of vaccination, you may be vaccinated on site, quarantined or returned to your previous location.

Sources: Embassy of Niger and GOV.UK

What Is the Climate Like in Niger?

The best time to visit Niger is between October and May, during the dry season. The country can be extremely hot during the summer, coupled with heavy rains in June and August.

Is Niger Safe?

The government of the UK warns about travelling to Niger because of risk of kidnapping, armed robbery, terrorism and other crimes.

Travellers should to be vigilant, especially at the border with Mali, the Diffa region and in the Lake Chad Basin area.

Extremist groups like the Islamic State and Al Qa’eda are active within Niger. Take extra precautions whilst travelling including avoiding travel at night.

The government of the UK may be limited in the help it can provide to travellers who find themselves in need of assistance in rural areas of Niger.

Even within Niamey, travellers should to avoid restaurants and night clubs where Westerners usually congregate. These could be targets for crime or terrorism.

Water in Niger should is often contaminated and should not avoided. A traveller’s diarrhoea kit as well as cholera, typhoid and hepatitis A vaccinations are highly recommended.

What Should I Take To Niger?

Niger has a tropical climate. Airy modest clothing made will help keep you cool and comfortable. It can also get cool during the evenings, so bring a jacket and some warmer layers as well.

Niger experiences heavy rains during the summer. During July and August bring a rain jacket and an umbrella.

Embassy of the United Kingdom in Niger

If you are in Niger and have an emergency (for example, been attacked, arrested or someone has died) contact the nearest consular services. Contact the embassy before arrival if you have additional questions on entry requirements, safety concerns or are in need of assistance.

While there is no consulate or embassy in Niger, it is served by the British embassy in Ghana:

British Embassy Ghana Julius Nyerere Link, off Gamel Abdul Nasser Accra Ghana Telephone: (00223) 44 97 69 13 Emergency Phone: +223 44 97 69 13 Fax: (00223) 44 97 69 11 Email: [email protected]

Ready to start your next journey? Ring us up at or book online now !

On This Page: Do I Need Vaccines for Niger? Do I Need a Visa or Passport for Niger? What Is the Climate Like in Niger? Is Niger Safe? What Should I Take To Niger? Embassy of the United Kingdom in Niger

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Nigeria Travel Advisory

Travel advisory september 20, 2023, nigeria - level 3: reconsider travel.

Updated with return to full operational status, removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links, and updates to Do Not Travel Areas.

Reconsider travel to Nigeria due to  crime ,  terrorism ,  civil unrest ,  kidnapping , and  armed gangs .   Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to :

  • Borno, Yobe, Kogi, and northern Adamawa states due to  terrorism  and  kidnapping
  • Bauchi, Gombe, Kaduna, Kano, Katsina, Sokoto, and Zamfara states due to  kidnapping
  • Abia, Anambra, Bayelsa, Delta, Enugu, Imo, and Rivers states (with the exception of Port Harcourt) due to  crime ,  kidnapping , and  armed gangs.

Country Summary :  Violent crime – such as armed robbery, assault, carjacking, kidnapping, hostage taking, roadside banditry, and rape – is common throughout the country. Kidnappings for ransom occur frequently, often targeting dual national citizens who have returned to Nigeria for a visit, as well as U.S. citizens with perceived wealth. Kidnapping gangs have also stopped victims on interstate roads.

Terrorists continue plotting and carrying out attacks in Nigeria. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting shopping centers, malls, markets, hotels, places of worship, restaurants, bars, schools, government installations, transportation hubs, and other places where crowds gather. Terrorists are known to work with local gangs to expand their reach.

There is civil unrest and armed gangs in parts of Southern Nigeria, especially in the Niger Delta and Southeast regions. Armed criminality and gangs, including kidnapping and assaults on Nigerian security services is also pervasive in this region.

Violence can flare up between communities of farmers and herders in rural areas.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Nigeria due to security conditions.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to Nigeria.

  If you decide to travel to Nigeria:

  • Carry proper identification, including a U.S. passport with a current Nigerian visa, if needed.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Review travel routes and times to vary your predictability.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Avoid demonstrations and large political gatherings.
  • Review your personal security plans.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Establish a “proof of life” protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax).
  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Nigeria.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest  Travel Health Information  related to your travel.

Borno, Yobe, Kogi, and Northern Adamawa states – Level 4: Do Not Travel

The security situation in these states is fluid and unpredictable due to widespread terrorist activity, inter-communal violence, and kidnapping. Security operations to counter these threats may occur without warning.

Terrorist groups based in the Northeast routinely target humanitarian camps, security forces, churches, schools, mosques, government installations, educational institutions, entertainment venues, and road travelers.

Approximately two million Nigerians have been displaced as a result of the violence in Northeast Nigeria.

Visit our website for  Travel to High-Risk Areas .

Bauchi, Gombe, Kaduna, Kano, Katsina, Sokoto and Zamfara states – Level 4: Do Not Travel

The security situation in these states is fluid and unpredictable due to widespread inter-communal violence and armed criminality, especially kidnapping and roadside banditry. Security operations to counter these threats may occur without warning.

Abia, Anambra, Bayelsa, Delta, Enugu, Imo, and Rivers states (with the exception of Port Harcourt) – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Crime is rampant throughout Southern Nigeria, and there is a heightened risk of kidnapping , violent civil unrest , and armed gangs .

Travel Advisory Levels

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Men Sitting in Zinder, Niger

Niger/Burkina Faso

In the middle of West Africa are the region's least visited countries, Burkina Faso and Niger. Largely untouched by modernising forces, these two countries are a time capsule containing diverse tribes and wildlife which call this land home. Our tour will take you to both countries' historical, natural, and cultural highlights. In Niger, you will travel East to the ancient Sultanate of Zinder, a city that has barely changed in centuries. As well as visit some of West Africa's last remaining giraffes at Koure Reserve. During the second half of our tour, you will head to Burkina Faso. From the modernising city of Ouagadougou to the village of Tiebele with its unique painted houses, this area has plenty of places and people to explore and meet. You'll later head to Burkina's music capital of Bobo Dioulasso, home to the Sahel-styled Old Mud Mosque. With fewer tourists in one year than Paris gets in one week, these two countries are perfect for any traveller needing an escape from modern tourism. We run our Niger and Burkina Faso tour every November. Scroll below to get more details. We can't wait for you to join us!

Upcoming Tours

Our current upcoming group tours can be seen below. They are all guaranteed departures.

fco travel advice niger

We run this tour once a year, starting in Niamey, Niger and ending in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Visas are required for both countries. We will provide the visa invitation letters.

Please note that this itinerary is subject to change due to the security situations in both countries.

Our tours are priced at £1,795 per person. Rooms are on a twin basis.

Single supplement is priced £320 or we can allocate someone for you to share with (subject to availability).

Deposit required to confirm your booking is £500.

Other Tours In West Africa

  • Sierra Leone and Liberia
  • Guinea and Guinea-Bissau

error_outline Security Advice

Please note that although we only run tours to areas we feel we can keep our clients safe, the British FCO advises against all but essential travel to all the areas we will visit on this tour.

We research the security of our destinations highly and safety is a priority for us, however, we advise you to do your own research as well to ensure you are comfortable with your trip.

Please note these travel warnings may also affect travel insurance for these regions, please contact us for advice on this. For the latest travel advice from the Foreign & Commonwealth Office including security and local laws, plus passport and visa information, click here

This tour is currently full.

To be added to the waiting list, please fill out the form below.

Please agreed to the T&Cs.

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All passengers booking with Lupine Travel are provided with 100% Financial Protection for all their payments made to us.

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Travel Advice for Indonesia

From 14 February, the Bali Provincial Government will apply a new tourist levy of IDR 150,000 per person to foreign tourists entering Bali. The tourist levy is separate from the e-Visa on Arrival or the Visa on Arrival. Cashless payments can be made online prior to travel or on arrival at designated payment counters at Bali's airport and seaport.

Consular assistance

The Consular Services Charter outlines the consular services and assistance provided by the Australian Government to travellers overseas. Read the Charter to understand how we can and can't help. 

Consular Services Charter (PDF 195.79 KB)

Notarial services

Do you need a document legalised, or a Certificate of No Impediment for your upcoming marriage? The Australian Government can provide some notarial services.

Travel insurance

 If you're going overseas, travel insurance is as important as a passport. If you can't afford travel insurance, you can't afford to travel. Read our advice, and download the CHOICE travel insurance guide before you go.

CHOICE travel insurance buying guide 2023 (PDF 3.52 MB)

News and updates

Travelling during lunar new year.

Lunar New Year is one of the most significant celebrations for East and Southeast Asian cultures. If you're travelling to or through a destination that celebrates the festival, do your research and know what to expect.

Prescription drugs and travel

Every year, Australians travelling overseas need consular help due to carrying or using prescription drugs illegally.

New survey shows concerning travel insurance trends

A new survey has revealed a concerning trend of uninsured travel among Australians. Many people are putting themselves at risk by travelling overseas without protection. 

Stay safe this festive season

With the festive season approaching, many Australians are heading overseas for a well-earned break or to visit family and friends. Although it's not festive to think about, some risks are greater during the holiday season.

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Travel advice explained

Learn what our advice levels mean and how we decide what level to apply to each destination. 

Passport services

With passport demand on the rise, don't leave your application to the last minute.

Allow a minimum of six weeks to get a new passport or renew one.

Coming back to Australia

Know what to do and what expect when you're heading home from your trip overseas. 

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Nigeria travel advice

Explore our complete guide to Nigeria with the latest travel advice for travellers and holidaymakers including official updates and local travel tips for Nigeria.

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Nigeria travel guide - essential info

Below is a beginner's guide to Nigeria with essential travel facts such as dominant language spoken, typical flight time from the UK and the local currency. You can also check whether visas are required and what plug adapter you need to pack.

Nigeria tourist information

✝ = requirements for UK travellers.

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Nigeria weather

The Nigeria weather guide shows long term monthly averages for Abuja .

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Destination Any destination Australia Cyprus France Germany Greece Ireland Italy Portugal South Africa Spain UK USA Africa North Africa Egypt Morocco South Africa Zimbabwe Asia Far East South East Asia Southern Asia India Indonesia Israel Japan Sri Lanka Taiwan Thailand UAE New South Wales Queensland South Australia Victoria Western Australia Austrian Alps Ibiza Majorca Menorca Alberta British Columbia Quebec Fuerteventura Gran Canaria La Gomera Lanzarote Tenerife Caribbean Antigua Barbados Cuba Jamaica Central America Costa Rica Red Sea Bedfordshire Berkshire Buckinghamshire Cambridgeshire Cheshire City of Bristol City of London Cornwall Cotswolds County Durham Cumbria Derbyshire Devon Dorset East Sussex East Yorkshire Essex Gloucestershire Greater London Greater Manchester Hampshire Herefordshire Hertfordshire Isle of Wight Kent Lake District Lancashire Leicestershire Lincolnshire Merseyside Norfolk North Yorkshire Northamptonshire Northumberland Nottinghamshire Oxfordshire Rutland Shropshire Somerset South Yorkshire Staffordshire Suffolk Surrey Tyne and Wear Warwickshire West Midlands West Sussex West Yorkshire Wiltshire Worcestershire Europe Austria Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany Gibraltar Greece Guernsey Hungary Iceland Ireland Isle of Man Italy Jersey Malta Montenegro Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey UK Alps Orlando Corsica Brittany Dordogne French Alps Loire Valley Normandy Provence South of France Corfu Crete Halkidiki Kefalonia Kos Mykonos Peloponnese Rhodes Samos Santorini Skiathos Zante Indian Ocean Mauritius Bali Campania Italian Lakes Italian Riviera Sardinia Sicily Tuscany Venetian Riviera Italian Alps Puglia Mediterranean Caribbean Coast Middle East North America Canada Mexico USA Oceania Australia New Zealand Algarve Madeira Scandinavia Balearic Islands Canary Islands Costa Almeria Costa Blanca Costa Brava Costa de la Luz Costa del Sol Costa Dorada Swiss Alps Antalya Coast Bodrum and Izmir Coast Dubai England Northern Ireland Scotland Wales California D.C. Florida

Check the latest travel advice on visiting Nigeria from official government sources (in english) from around the world including entry requirements and travel restrictions.

  • UK traveller advice for Nigeria - UK FCDO
  • Irish traveller advice for Nigeria - Department of Foreign Affairs, Ireland
  • Canadian travel advice for Nigeria - Government of Canada
  • US travel advisories for Nigeria - US Department of State
  • Safe travel advisories for Nigeria - Ministry of Foreign Affairs, New Zealand
  • Smarter traveller advice for Nigeria - Department of Foreign Affairs, Australia

Learn more about the current safety and security risks from terrorism, natural disasters and more. Read about the local laws and customs to consider when travelling around Nigeria.

Note : UK FCDO - UK Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office

FCDO travel advice

Destination Any destination France Germany Greece India Italy Portugal Spain Turkey USA Algeria Angola Benin Botswana Burkina Faso Burundi Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Congo-Brazzaville Congo-Kinshasa Djibouti Egypt Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Eswatini Ethiopia Gabon Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau Ivory Coast Kenya Lesotho Liberia Libya Malawi Mali Mauritania Morocco Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Rwanda Sao Tome and Principe Senegal Sierra Leone Somalia South Africa South Sudan St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Sudan Tanzania Togo Tunisia Uganda Western Sahara Zambia Zimbabwe Falkland Islands South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands Afghanistan Armenia Azerbaijan Bahrain Bangladesh Bhutan Brunei Cambodia China East Timor Gaza Strip Georgia Hong Kong India Indonesia Iran Iraq Israel Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Lebanon Macau Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Myanmar Nepal North Korea Oman Pakistan Philippines Qatar Russia (Central Asia) Russia (Far East) Saudi Arabia Singapore South Korea Sri Lanka Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Thailand Turkmenistan UAE Uzbekistan Vietnam West Bank Yemen Anguilla Antigua Aruba Bahamas Barbados Bonaire British Virgin Islands Cayman Islands Cuba Curacao Dominica Dominican Republic Grenada Guadeloupe Haiti Jamaica Martinique Montserrat Saba Sint Eustatius Sint Maarten St Barthelemy St Kitts and Nevis St Lucia St Martin St Vincent and the Grenadines Trinidad and Tobago Turks and Caicos Islands Belize Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras Nicaragua Panama Albania Andorra Austria Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Faroe Islands Finland France Germany Gibraltar Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy Jan Mayen Kosovo Latvia Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macedonia Malta Moldova Monaco Montenegro Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Russia San Marino Serbia Slovakia Slovenia Spain Svalbard Sweden Switzerland Turkey Ukraine British Indian Ocean Territory Comoros Madagascar Mauritius Mayotte Reunion Seychelles Bermuda Canada Greenland Mexico St Pierre and Miquelon USA Australia Federated States of Micronesia Fiji French Polynesia Kiribati Marshall Islands Nauru New Caledonia New Zealand Palau Papua New Guinea Pitcairn Island Samoa Solomon Islands Tonga Tuvalu Vanuatu Wallis and Futuna Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Ecuador French Guiana Guyana Paraguay Peru Suriname Uruguay Venezuela

Nigeria travel health

Find out more about staying safe when travelling to Nigeria with the latest guidance on required vaccinations and recommended medication to take with you.

  • Vaccines & medicines for Nigeria - CDC
  • Health & vaccinations for Nigeria - TravelHealthPro, NaTHNac
  • How to stay safe & healthy in Nigeria - Fit for Travel, Public Health Scotland

Check out the general travel tips for staying safe and healthy in Nigeria, risks of preventable diseases and what to pack.

Note : CDC - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Nigeria covid live updates

Check the latest live updates on Covid-19 in Nigeria with the vaccination requirements, current available statistics and up-to-date travel advice from government agencies.

  • Travellers' health for Nigeria - Nigeria Centre for Disease Control
  • Coronavirus timeline in Nigeria - Our World in Data

Nigeria travel features

Do you want to learn more about Nigeria? Read our latest features covering travel tips and insider destination guides on where to go and what to do in Nigeria.

We don't currently have any travel features on Nigeria. Discover more about holiday destinations around the world with this selection of general travel articles.

Top 10 sunny holiday destinations year round

Nigeria FAQs

Read our frequently asked questions about travelling to Nigeria including the current entry restrictions, covid rules, driving side, electrical plugs used and much more.

Are there entry restrictions to Nigeria due to Covid-19?

Nigeria is open for tourism from the UK. There are no special entry requirements for Nigeria. Check out Nigeria Centre for Disease Control for more information.

Do I need to quarantine in the UK if I travel from Nigeria?

You do not need to quarantine on arrival in the UK from Nigeria. The UK no longer requires a passenger locator form, Covid-19 test or proof of vaccination.

What is the time difference between Nigeria and the UK?

The time difference between Nigeria and the UK is UK time+1 hour .

What is the main language spoken in Nigeria?

The main languages spoken in Nigeria are English , Hausa and Yoruba . Learn a language for Nigeria with Rosetta Stone * , Lingoda * and Busuu * .

What is the currency in Nigeria?

The currency in Nigeria is the Nigerian Naira ( NGN ). Send money to Nigeria with Wise.com * and World Remit * .

Which plugs are used in Nigeria?

Nigeria uses electrical plug type D + G (230 Volts) .

Which side of the road do they drive on in Nigeria?

They drive on the right side of the road in Nigeria.

Transport options for Nigeria

Airport transfers to Nigeria

Do you need a visa for Nigeria?

Yes, UK passport holders do need a visa to enter Nigeria. Check Nigeria visa requirements for all passport holders with VisaHQ * and iVisa.com * .

Travel advice by country

Country name All countries - summary Algarve Balearic Islands Barbados Canary Islands Croatia Cyprus Egypt Faroe Islands France Germany Greece Ireland Italy Jamaica Madeira Maldives Malta Portugal Spain Turkey UAE UK USA Algeria Angola Benin Botswana Burkina Faso Burundi Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Congo-Brazzaville Congo-Kinshasa Djibouti Egypt Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Ethiopia Gabon Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau Ivory Coast Kenya Lesotho Liberia Libya Malawi Mali Mauritania Morocco Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Rwanda Sao Tome and Principe Senegal Sierra Leone Somalia South Africa South Sudan Sudan Swaziland Tanzania Togo Tunisia Uganda Western Sahara Zambia Zimbabwe Antarctica French Southern and Antarctic Lands South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands Afghanistan Armenia Azerbaijan Bahrain Bangladesh Bhutan Brunei Cambodia China East Timor Georgia Hong Kong India Indonesia Iran Iraq Israel Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Lebanon Macau Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Myanmar Nepal North Korea Oman Pakistan Philippines Qatar Russia (Central Asia) Russia (Far East) Saudi Arabia Singapore South Korea Sri Lanka Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Thailand Turkmenistan UAE Uzbekistan Vietnam Yemen Anguilla Antigua Aruba Bahamas Barbados Bonaire British Virgin Islands Cayman Islands Cuba Curacao Dominica Dominican Republic Grenada Guadeloupe Haiti Jamaica Martinique Montserrat Puerto Rico Saba Sint Eustatius Sint Maarten St Barthelemy St Kitts and Nevis St Lucia St Martin St Vincent and the Grenadines Trinidad and Tobago Turks and Caicos Virgin Islands Belize Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras Nicaragua Panama Albania Andorra Austria Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Faroe Islands Finland France Germany Gibraltar Greece Guernsey Hungary Iceland Ireland Isle of Man Italy Jan Mayen Jersey Kosovo Latvia Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Moldova Monaco Montenegro Netherlands North Macedonia Norway Poland Portugal Romania Russia San Marino Serbia Slovakia Slovenia Spain Svalbard Sweden Switzerland Turkey UK Ukraine British Indian Ocean Territory Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Comoros Madagascar Mauritius Mayotte Reunion Seychelles Bermuda Canada Greenland Mexico St Pierre and Miquelon USA American Samoa Australia Cook Islands Federated States of Micronesia Fiji French Polynesia Guam Kiribati Marshall Islands Midway Island Nauru New Caledonia New Zealand Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Palau Papua New Guinea Pitcairn Island Samoa Solomon Islands Tokelau Tonga Tuvalu Vanuatu Wake Island Wallis and Futuna Algarve Azores Madeira Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Ecuador Falkland Islands French Guiana Guyana Paraguay Peru Suriname Uruguay Venezuela Balearic Islands Canary Islands England Northern Ireland Scotland Wales Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut D.C. Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

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IMAGES

  1. Niger travel advice

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  2. FCO Travel Advice

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  3. Long-awaited Guide Plan.Pack.Explore from FCO

    fco travel advice niger

  4. Foreign Office travel advice: FCO rule

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  5. FCO Travel Advice

    fco travel advice niger

  6. FCO Travel Advice: Oyster Worldwide and the Know Before You Go Campaign

    fco travel advice niger

COMMENTS

  1. Niger travel advice

    2 November 2023 Latest update: This travel advice has been rewritten to make it easier to read and understand. UK staff have returned to Niger after they were temporarily withdrawn in August....

  2. Niger Travel Advisory

    January 8, 2024 Niger - Level 3: Reconsider Travel K U T C Last updated on January 8, 2023, to remove the Ordered Departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and eligible family members, and lower the overall risk level from Level 4 to Level 3. Reconsider travel to Niger due to risk of crime, civil unrest, terrorism, and kidnapping.

  3. Foreign travel advice

    Get advice about travelling abroad, including the latest information on coronavirus, safety and security, entry requirements and travel warnings. Countries or territories 226 A Afghanistan...

  4. Niger: Travel Advisory Raised to Level 4

    Last Update: Reissued on August 2, 2023 to reflect the ordered departure of non-emergency U.S. government personnel and eligible family members. U.S. citizens have previously been advised to reconsider travel to Niger due to crime, terrorism, and kidnapping. On July 26, President Mohamed Bazoum was placed under house arrest amidst efforts to overthrow the democratically elected government […]

  5. Niger

    Stay Healthy and Safe Learn actions you can take to stay healthy and safe on your trip. Vaccines cannot protect you from many diseases in Niger, so your behaviors are important. Eat and drink safely Food and water standards around the world vary based on the destination.

  6. Niger International Travel Information

    January 8, 2024 Niger - Level 3: Reconsider Travel K U T C Reconsider travel to Niger due to risk of crime, civil unrest, terrorism, and kidnapping. ... [READ MORE] Embassy Messages Alerts View Alerts and Messages Archive Quick Facts PASSPORT VALIDITY: Must be valid at time of entry BLANK PASSPORT PAGES: Two pages are required for entry stamp

  7. Niger

    Niger (Africa) Advice for All Destinations Vaccinations Malaria Malaria Map Other Health Risks Alerts News Advice for All Destinations COVID-19 Read the information on the COVID-19: Health Considerations for Travel page for advice on travelling during the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccinations and malaria risk

  8. Niger travel guide

    The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) cannot provide tailored advice for individual trips. Read this travel advice and carry out your own research before deciding whether to travel. Emergency services in Niger. Ambulance: 15. Fire: 18. Police: 17 Contact your travel provider and insurer

  9. Travel Vaccines and Advice for Niger

    Travel Vaccines and Advice for Niger Nationwide Travel Health Services Yellow Fever Vaccination Available Niger Specific Advice Travellers' Diarrhea Kits Available Niger is small West African country, and one of the poorest countries in the world. Niamey, the capital of Niger, is located along the Niger river.

  10. Niger

    General Travel Advice. The Department of Foreign Affairs strongly advises against all travel to Niger at this time due to political unrest. Irish citizens require a visa to enter Niger. A valid passport is required for travel to Niger. Irish passports should have a minimum validity of six months. Passport cards cannot be used.

  11. Travel Advice By Destination

    Travel Advice By Destination | Department of Foreign Affairs | Ireland - this is Ireland. China - Hong Kong / Macao. Congo, Democratic Republic of (DRC) Côte d'Ivoire. Israel and the Occupied Territories. Korea, Democratic Republic of (North Korea) Korea, Republic of (South Korea) Kyrgyz Republic (Kyrgyzstan) North Macedonia, Republic of.

  12. Nigeria Travel Advisory

    September 20, 2023 Nigeria - Level 3: Reconsider Travel O K U T C Updated with return to full operational status, removal of obsolete COVID-19 page links, and updates to Do Not Travel Areas. Reconsider travel to Nigeria due to crime , terrorism , civil unrest , kidnapping, and armed gangs. Some areas have increased risk.

  13. Niger

    NigerEmbassies and consulates. Niger has 30 embassies abroad, as well as 38 consulates and three other representations. Niamey, the capital of Niger, hosts 26 embassies, and in addition there are a total of 12 consulates and another two representations located in Niger. 26.

  14. Niger travel restrictions, quarantine and entry requirements in 2024

    The travel advice is Do not travel to Niger. Niger is Unknown restrictions for travel. Get travel ban, restrictions alerts and advice before travelling to Niger. Niger is part of Africa with main city at Niamey. Its Least Developed country with a population of 21M people. The main currency is West African CFA franc. The languages spoken are French.

  15. Mali-Niger border

    The Mali-Niger border is 828 km (520 m) in length and runs from the tripoint with Burkina Faso in the west to the tripoint with Algeria in the east. ... Travel to the border region is discouraged by third party governments owing to the high incidence of kidnap and criminality, and the ongoing instability resulting from the Tuareg rebellions ...

  16. PDF Nigeria: Travel Advice

    FCO 312 Edition 17 (March 2020) Users should note that this map has been designed for briefing purposes only and it should not be used for determining the precise location of places or features. This map should not be considered an authority on the delimitation of international boundaries or on the spelling of place and feature names.

  17. Lupine Travel

    Upcoming Tours. Our current upcoming group tours can be seen below. They are all guaranteed departures. Full info £ 1,795.00 10 Nights 0 places. Niger and Burkina Faso Highlights Tour Nov 3-13 2024 Itinerary. Book shopping_cart £ 1,895.00 10 Nights 6+ places. Niger and Burkina Faso Highlights Tour Nov 2-12 2025 Itinerary.

  18. Homepage

    Providing international travel advice for Australians overseas. Learn more about Smartraveller. Travel Advice for Indonesia. From 14 February, the Bali Provincial Government will apply a new tourist levy of IDR 150,000 per person to foreign tourists entering Bali. The tourist levy is separate from the e-Visa on Arrival or the Visa on Arrival.

  19. List of diplomatic missions of Niger

    This is a list of diplomatic missions of Niger, excluding honorary consulates.Niger maintains permanent diplomatic missions in 25 [citation needed] nations around the world, both on the ambassadorial and the consular level. The diplomatic staff of the Republic of Niger reports to the Presidency of Niger through the Nigerien Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation.

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    Nigeria travel guide - essential info. Below is a beginner's guide to Nigeria with essential travel facts such as dominant language spoken, typical flight time from the UK and the local currency. You can also check whether visas are required and what plug adapter you need to pack. Nigeria - quick facts. Time difference.