The Sitting Bee

Short Story Reviews

The Journey by Barrie Hough

In The Journey by Barrie Hough we have the theme of friendship, fear, connection, helplessness, control, equality and perseverance.  Narrated in the third person by an unnamed narrator it becomes clear to the reader after reading the story that Hough may be exploring theme of friendship. Thembi and Johan have a very special connection with one another despite the fact that Johan can at times be difficult to understand because of his stutter. Despite this Thembi remains by Johan’s side as a friend would do and challenges Johan to better himself. This may be important as by challenging himself Johan manages to reach his goal of speaking without stuttering. Though at first he is annoyed with Thembi later on in the story it becomes clear that all Thembi’s challenges have been worth it. Johan also feels connected to Thembi because like him she is an outsider and may not necessarily be accepted by the other students in the school. Though Thembi does appear to be able to stand up for herself and has the skills to verbally defend herself. She is after all a member of the school debating society.

By not going into too much detail about the other students in the school Hough also manages to keep the reader focused on the fledgling relationship between Thembi and Johan and the pressure that Johan feels he is under in order to please Thembi. At one stage in the story Thembi gets angry with Johan and considers his demands to be unreasonable. When the reality is Thembi is only trying to help Johan who unfortunately feels helpless when it comes to his speech. However it is noticeable that Johan does not give up. Instead he perseveres and shows resilience. Beating the challenge that has been put before him by Thembi. This too could be significant as Hough may be suggesting that others who may feel stifled by life can succeed if they only try that little bit harder and persevere. Like Johan they too can overcome the obstacles that life puts in front of them regardless of how difficult they might feel the task at hand is. In reality everybody should have hope in their life for it is hope for something better that helps at times to pull a person into a new and brighter day.

What is also interesting about Johan’s fears is the fact that he knows that should he not talk to Thembi without stuttering. He will not have the opportunity to kiss her. It being clear to the reader that Johan likes Thembi as one would like a girlfriend. In many ways the story could be seen as a story of a young teenage boy overcoming adversity and getting the girl he loves. Something which is not necessarily a reality for most people. Thembi has everything that Johan needs and he knows this. He just needs to be patient and to be able to control his speech. Without losing his temper because he finds the task at hand so difficult. Though Johan may not know it. Thembi only has Johan’s best interests at heart. She wants him to succeed as she too knows what it is like to be on the outside of society. By challenging Johan Thembi is also making sure that Johan advances in life and that one obstacle at least has been cleared. Having a speech impediment can leave a person feeling insecure within themselves because of society’s cruelties. Whether society means to be cruel is not important. What is important is that someone like Johan can lose all confidence if they are ridiculed by their peers.

The end of the story is also interesting as the reader senses how happy both Thembi and Johan are. Thembi’s faith in Johan has been rewarded and Johan has manged to control his speech. Hough possibly suggesting that things in the future will be good for both Thembi and Johan. Johan will get to kiss Thembi for the first time. Something which will further connect both Thembi and Johan. If anything Johan, thanks to Thembi, can hold his head high and be full of confidence. No longer will he be ostracized by his peers and if he is he has the confidence to now stand up for himself should the need arise. By challenging Johan. Thembi has managed to give him back control over his life. It is as though Johan is starting life all over again but this time he is everybody’s equal. He does not have to isolate himself in fear of being ridiculed by his peers. Just as there is a new South Africa. There is a new Johan. Johan gets the girl, gets control back of his life and gets to see the dawning of a new and equal South Africa.

  • The Apprentice by Odun Balogun
  • Next Door by Tobias Wolff
  • The Little Match Girl by Hans Christian Andersen
  • First Confession by Frank O’Connor

22 comments

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Thembi’ home language

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What is the setting of the story

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School and Johan’s home

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Mid 1990’s on May during mandelas inauguration

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At school after the first democratic elecrions

They are at school

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How did johan and thembi become friends

Ok so Johan made Thembi feel welcome when everyone was discriminating her

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Thanks Freddy.

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Can l please have the the elements of the story

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What are the genres and types of a short story is this

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What does thembi mean when he says life’s not a musical?

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What illustrate that barry hough is using a third person limited narrator to tell the story

A third person narrator uses he/she when referring to characters. A limited narrator does not know more than the reader nor do they know everything.

What ‘quiet language’ that Johan can read

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Directions from Thembi’s house to Johan’s house

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Okay what is the plot main event of the story please get back to me sap

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I think you made a mistake or maybe can you please explain this line for me

“At one stage in the story Thembi gets angry with Thembi and considers her demands to be unreasonable”

Thanks Kholofelo. You’re right.

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the journey grade 11 short story

Patricia Grace

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Gr 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Lesson Plan Short Stories.pdf

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In this unit, students will explore great works of American literature and consider how writers reflect the time period in which they write. They will write two literary analysis papers and also work in groups to research and develop anthologies of excellent American stories.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Students read and analyze stories from several 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century American authors. After researching a time period, they select stories from that period to create an anthology. The readings enhance their understanding of the short story, increase their exposure to well-known American authors, and allow them to examine the influence of social, cultural, and political context.
  • Students examine elements of short stories and have an opportunity for close reading of several American short stories. During these close readings, they examine the ways that short story writers attempt to explore the greater truths of the American experience through their literature.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

  • If you were to write a short story about this decade, what issues might you focus on?
  • What defines a short story? Just length?
  • To what extent do these stories reflect the era or decade in which they were written?
  • To what extent are the themes they address universal?

CLASSROOM FILMS

History.com has short videos on the Vietnam War (“Vietnam” and “A Soldier's Story”).

  • American Literature
  • Grade 11 ELA

The American Short Story

  • Resource Library

Education Standards

Wyoming standards for english language arts.

Learning Domain: Language

Standard: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Standard: Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.

Standard: Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage, Garner’s Modern American English) as needed.

Standard: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Standard: Observe hyphenation conventions.

Standard: Spell correctly.

Standard: Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

Standard: Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte’s Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.

Standard: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Standard: Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

Standard: Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).

Standard: Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

Standard: Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

Standard: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Standard: Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.

Standard: Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

Standard: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Learning Domain: Reading for Informational Text

Standard: Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Standard: Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.

Standard: Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

Learning Domain: Reading for Literature

Standard: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Standard: Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

Standard: Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

Standard: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Standard: Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

Standard: Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

Standard: Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

Learning Domain: Speaking and Listening

Standard: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Standard: Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

Standard: Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.

Standard: Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

Standard: Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

Standard: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

Standard: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

Standard: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks.

Standard: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Standard: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grades 11-12 Language standards 1 and 3 on page 54 for specific expectations.)

Learning Domain: Writing

Standard: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Standard: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Standard: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Standard: Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

Standard: Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

Standard: Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

Standard: Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.

Standard: Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

Standard: Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

Standard: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

Standard: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 11-12 on page 55.)

Standard: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Standard: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

Standard: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

Standard: Draw evidence form literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Maryland College and Career Ready English Language Arts Standards

Standard: Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, Garner's Modern American English) as needed.

Standard: Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte's Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.

Standard: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11-12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Standard: Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

Standard: Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

Learning Domain: Reading Literature

Standard: Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

Standard: Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

Standard: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11���12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others�۪ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Standard: Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

Standard: Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience�۪s knowledge of the topic.

Standard: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1���3 above.)

Standard: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1���3 up to and including grades 11-12 on page 55.)

Common Core State Standards English Language Arts

Cluster: Key Ideas and Details.

Cluster: Craft and Structure.

Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas.

Cluster: Text Types and Purposes.

Cluster: Range of Writing.

Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing.

Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge.

Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration.

Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas.

Cluster: Conventions of Standard English.

Cluster: Knowledge of Language.

Cluster: Vocabulary Acquisition and Use.

Vocabulary  

File size 500.3 KB

“The Swimmer” Organizer  

File size 45.8 KB

“The Search for Knowledge” Notes  

File size 543.1 KB

Independent Reading Journal  

Dialectical Journal  

File size 46.2 KB

“The Things They Carried” Paragraph Annotation  

File size 915.1 KB

Unit Accomplishments  

File size 78.4 KB

  • Introduction to the Short Story

Quick Write: The American Short Story

  • Class, Race, and Identity

Dialogue and Speech

  • Symbol and Motif

Images and Slogans of the American Dream

  • "The Things They Carried"

Vietnam

  • Culminating Project and Paper

Essay Planning

Poetry & Short Story Competitions

  • Short Story

The Journey

  • Caitlin Selge, Grade 11

Stepping off the train, the old woman slowly walked out onto the platform. The cool breeze tingling over her skin, as she breathed in the familiar scent of the town, she grew up in. Hugging her brown, leather briefcase to her chest, she went down the steps one at a time, finding herself on a small street surrounded by jacaranda trees in full bloom. Walking down this street, her youth jumped out as she kicked a pile of purple flowers, smiling as they floated back down to the ground. Wandering the streets, she saw one that looked familiar. Was it her street? Of course, it was. Heading down this street, she noted that it looked just as it did before. The new Aldi that had been built on top of the houses was gone, as were the fancy apartment blocks. She waved to her best friend Jane, riding her bike down the street. Across the road, she saw John, the old man who always baked her cookies as a child. Finally, at the end of the street, she saw her house. With its beautiful yellow bricks, and small, white picket fence, she knew she was home. Her parents were waiting by the front door, standing on their white deck, smiling as she approached, before turning and disappearing into the house. Following them, she placed her briefcase down and took off her pink fur coat, putting her hand out to touch the almost smooth wall. The scratch she made with a makeshift wand was still there, as was the creaky floorboard just below it. The family photos were hanging on the wall where they always had, and from the kitchen came a waft of her favourite meal, her mum’s casserole. Walking up the stairs, with a newfound bounce in her step, she walked to her old, although somehow present bedroom. Inside everything was how she had it, her dolls on the windowsill, pictures on the wall, her favourite books in the bookshelf, and rainbow bed covers. From downstairs she heard “Dinner’s ready Lu-Lu.” “Coming mum!” Running down the stairs, she sprinted to the kitchen to get her food. Her mother and father laughed as she gobbled it up, watching, as their daughter pulled funny faces before they all went to clean up together. Death is a funny thing. Many people on Earth fear it, and many have tried to find out what it is and what it means. I have seen it. I was there when the Romans conquered most the world, I was there when the atomic bomb hit, I was there in Vietnam, and in Afghanistan. I was there when your friend was raped and murdered and when a kid opened fire at their school. I was there. I know death. Yet even though it happens all the time, people still seem to hate me, and scream at me, and pray I never touch them again. Please know…even death has a heart.

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Or check our popular categories..., the love potion short story grade 11 questions and answers.

Love, the enigmatic force that has captivated hearts and inspired countless tales throughout history, remains a subject of endless fascination. It is a universal experience that transcends time, culture, and boundaries, driving individuals to extraordinary lengths in their pursuit of affection. In the short story “Love Potion,” the renowned author (author’s name) weaves a captivating narrative that explores the complexities of love, courtship, and the intriguing interplay between deception and desire.

Set against the backdrop of Groot Marico, a charming town nestled in the old Western Transvaal during the 1940s, “Love Potion” unfolds with a blend of humor, irony, and unexpected revelations. The story follows the adventures of Gideon van der Merwe, a seemingly earnest young man, who embarks on a quest to win the heart of Lettie, the girl of his dreams. Guided by the mischievous narrator, Oom Schalk Lourens, readers are taken on a journey that challenges conventional notions of love and showcases the intricate dance between truth and pretense.

In this analysis article, we delve deeper into the themes, structure, and narrative elements of “Love Potion” to unravel its underlying messages and explore the author’s portrayal of love and its complexities. We will examine the richly developed characters, the story’s plot structure, and the stylistic devices employed by the author, shedding light on the satirical tones, ironic twists, and humorous moments that make this tale a delight to experience.

Through our exploration, we aim to gain a deeper understanding of the human condition in matters of the heart. We will delve into the themes of love and courtship, analyzing the cultural customs that shape romantic relationships and the sometimes comical, sometimes poignant lengths people go to express their affections. Additionally, we will examine the themes of deception and hypocrisy, unraveling the intricate web of lies and hidden intentions that characters weave in their pursuit of love.

Join us as we embark on this captivating journey into the heart of “Love Potion,” deciphering its narrative intricacies, and uncovering the profound insights it offers into the human experience of love. Through our analysis, we hope to shed light on the profound and often paradoxical nature of love, leaving readers with a deeper appreciation for the complexities that underpin our most cherished emotions.

Table of Contents

The Love Potion Short Story Grade 11 Analysis

In the quaint town of Groot Marico, amidst the enchanting beauty of the bush and the intriguing customs of the 1940s, a story of love and deception unfolds. Our narrator, Oom Schalk Lourens, takes us on a journey filled with humor, irony, and unexpected twists. The tale revolves around Gideon van der Merwe, a seemingly earnest young man, who sets out on a quest to win the heart of Lettie, the girl of his dreams. Little does he know that his pursuit will lead him down a path of deception and unexpected revelations.

The story takes place in Groot Marico, nestled in the old Western Transvaal during the 1940s. The lush bush, adorned with a kopje, provides a picturesque backdrop for the events that transpire. The action unfolds both in the natural wilderness and within the cozy voorkamer (front/sitting room) of Krisjan Cordier’s farm.

Characters:

  • The witty and observant narrator.
  • Possesses a hint of vanity, often twisting tales to his advantage.
  • Displays a friendly disposition and gets along well with others.
  • Initially portrayed as earnest, shy, and somewhat gullible.
  • Secretly in love with Lettie but struggles to express his feelings.
  • Viewed as a likeable, yet seemingly useless individual by Oom Schalk.
  • Reveals unexpected astuteness as the story progresses.
  • Krisjan Cordier’s daughter, the object of Gideon’s affection.
  • Shy but exhibits moments of openness when it comes to her emotions.
  • Discloses her love for Gideon to Oom Schalk in confidence.
  • Gains confidence in expressing her feelings throughout the narrative.
  • Pretends to be affected by the juice of the juba-plant to reveal her love for Gideon.
  • Lettie’s father, a garrulous and vivacious character.
  • Known for recounting his life story in sequential order.
  • Firmly believes that sharing incidents from his life can offer guidance to others.

Plot Structure:

Exposition: Oom Schalk introduces us to the juba-plant berry, believed to possess a love-inducing effect. Squeezing the berry into someone’s coffee is said to make them fall in love with the person who offered the brew.

Rising Action:

While engaging in illegal hunting one night, Oom Schalk encounters a policeman’s hat. Fleeing from the scene, he inadvertently falls off a cliff. Gideon van der Merwe, the same policeman, finds him. Gideon confides in Oom Schalk, revealing his intention to find the juba-plant for Lettie. Oom Schalk seizes the opportunity to inquire if the berry is intended for Lettie Cordier.

Oom Schalk visits Krisjan Cordier the following day, engaging in conversation about Gideon. Lettie blushes and her eyes light up at the mention of Gideon. In a private conversation, Lettie discloses her love for Gideon to Oom Schalk.

Falling Action:

Oom Schalk advises Lettie on a plan to use the juba-plant juice to reveal her love. Lettie is to place her coffee cup within Gideon’s reach, allowing him to add the berry juice. She then returns to the room, pretending to have fallen in love with him.

Resolution:

When Oom Schalk encounters Gideon again, he inquires if the love potion worked. To Oom Schalk’s surprise, Gideon reveals that he knew all along about Oom Schalk’s visit to Krisjan that morning. Gideon cunningly orchestrated the situation, fully aware that Oom Schalk had informed Lettie about his feelings for her. The tables turn, showcasing the irony of the story, as Gideon proves to be the one fooling Oom Schalk, rather than the other way around.

Style and Structure:

Narrative Voice: The story unfolds through Oom Schalk Lourens’ first-person narration, immersing readers in his witty and observant perspective. His engaging storytelling style keeps readers entertained as he unravels the tale.

Humor is interwoven throughout the narrative, with Oom Schalk poking fun at people and situations. His ability to find amusement in the quirks and foibles of those around him adds a lighthearted touch to the story.

The story employs irony to surprise readers. Gideon’s seemingly gullible nature and reliance on the juba-plant juice to win Lettie’s love creates an expectation of him being deceived. However, the climax reveals his astute planning, turning the initial perception on its head.

The tone varies throughout the story. Satirical undertones are used to mock the appearances of the men in Marico, while ironic tones arise when contrasting the expectations of a moonlit night for hunting with the reality of being caught breaking the law.

Love and Courtship: The story delves into the complexities of love and courtship, exploring the challenges and customs surrounding romantic relationships. It highlights the lengths individuals may go to in pursuit of love, even resorting to deceptive measures.

Deception and Hypocrisy:

The characters in the story engage in various forms of deception. They portray themselves as honest and virtuous, yet when driven by their desires, they discard their moral values. The narrative exposes the hypocrisy that can arise when individuals are willing to compromise their integrity to achieve their goals.

“Love Potion: A Delightfully Deceptive Tale” takes readers on a journey through the enchanting town of Groot Marico, filled with humor, irony, and unexpected twists. It explores the themes of love, courtship, deception, and hypocrisy, showcasing the intricacies of human relationships. As Oom Schalk Lourens spins his engaging narrative, readers are left amused, surprised, and contemplating the unpredictable nature of love and the lengths people will go to find it.

the journey grade 11 short story

Refer to line 1. (‘I rode over…remind him about.’)

  • (a) Why do you think did the narrator need the sheep-dip? (1) It was near the time for his sheep to be vaccinated/dipped.
  • (b) Explain in your OWN words why the narrator did not get the sheepdip from Krisjan. (1) Krisjan spoke most of the time, avoiding the subject of sheep-dip, telling him rather of events that took place when he was nine.

Explain why the following statement is TRUE. Write down TWO points from the extract to prove your answer. “The narrator paid more attention to Lettie rather than listening to the remarks of Krisjan”. (2) The narrator did not pay much attention to what Krisjan said. He was observing her reaction when he mentioned Gideon’s name. He saw the colour on her cheeks and the light in her eyes.

Refer to lines 19–20. (‘and her full … very pretty picture.’)

(a) Explain the metaphor in lines 19–20. (1) The narrator compares what he observes about Lettie to a pretty picture/ He describes her as beautiful.

(b) Identify and discuss the tone evident in this line. (2)

Admiration/desire. √ The narrator admires Lettie and has a desire to be romantically involved with her. His only obstacle is Gideon. √

Refer to lines 16–17. (‘She didn’t give … I saw enough.’)

(a) What are ‘these things’ that the narrator is referring to? (2) The narrator is referring to reactions √ of women/people who are in love.

(b) In your OWN words write down TWO things that he observes when Gideon’s name is mentioned.

Lettie is blushing. √ Lettie’s eyes sparkle.

Bosman uses the technique of fictional storytelling to narrate the story. Explain what is meant by ‘fictional story-telling.’ (3)

Accept a relevant response which shows an understanding of fictional story-telling. Bosman uses imaginary stories to narrate his story. This contributes to the humour and the absurd tone of the story. The ridiculousness of the story keeps the reader glued and he cannot wait for the conclusion of the story. Bosman successfully involves the reader emotionally in the story. √√√

Refer to the story as a whole. Discuss the relevance of the title, The Love Potion. (4) Open-ended. Accept a relevant response that shows an understanding of how the short story relates to the title, among others: She would forget the flaws of the man who wants her to fall in love with him. She would forget about the reasons why she did not want to marry him. She would fall in love with the first man she sees when she looks over her coffee cup. She would see him as strikingly attractive even if he is not.

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ENGLISH FAL GR. 11 T2 W7 Intro to Short Story (THE LOVE POTION) – Author’s background: Reading and Viewing

Intro to Short Story (THE LOVE POTION) – Author’s background: Reading and Viewing

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the journey grade 11 short story

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  1. Short Story Analysis: The Journey by Barrie Hough

    In The Journey by Barrie Hough we have the theme of friendship, fear, connection, helplessness, control, equality and perseverance. ... September 13, 2021 11:19 am What are the genres and types of a short story is this. Reply. Melody. January 25, 2022 6:12 pm ...

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  3. Gr 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Resource Pack Short Stories.pdf

    Gr 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Resource Pack Short Stories.pdf. Gr 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Resource Pack Short Stories.pdf — 26213 KB.

  4. ENGLISH FAL GR. 11 T3 W2: Part 1: Short Story

    Part 1: Short Story - Reading, analysis and contextual questions of Scared by Anthony Horowitz. Part 2: Long Transactional writing activity Part 3: Language and Editing skills. ... 7 Grade 8 Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 BROADCASTS . Online, Radio & TV MY LEARNER DASHBOARD . GET Learner Dashboard ...

  5. PDF Grade 11 Notes: The Short Story

    II. a. Fiction- based upon the author's imagination; characters, events and action are MADE UP. Escape Literature- written purely for entertainment value; usually NO THEME, or the theme is not essential; aka pulp writing. Interpretive Literature- contains one or more THEME; written to sharpen or broaden our view of life and it should lead to ...

  6. Journey Summary & Analysis

    Analysis. The narrator prepares for his trip into the city to meet officials about his land. He thinks of himself as "an old man going on a journey," though he notes that he is only 71, not really an old man. His family buttons up his coat for him and gives him money, making him feel more like an old man than he wants.

  7. PDF The Journey Quick Questions

    The Journey Answers The brave adventurer fought his way through the tangle of ivy and looked up at the tall, grey tower. Finally, he had made it. Not wanting to waste a moment longer, he began the treacherous journey towards the open window at the very top. Eventually, with scraped hands and bruised shins, he arrived. Immediately, he was greeted

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  9. gr-11-term-1-2019-efal-lesson-plan-short-stories.pdf

    2 Any six stories may be selected from 'Shuters English First Additional Language, Grade 11 Short Story Anthology', by B. Krone and E. Mattson. ... 11 English First Additional Language • Swimming Partners by Timwa Lipenga • The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry • The Journey by Barry Hough • Raymond's Run by Toni Cade Bambara .

  10. PDF Grade 11 ELA Evergreen Curriculum Resources

    The 11 short stories in this collection are written from a young adult point of view ... English Language Arts Grade 11 - Moving Forward-Establishing and Realizing. Fractures: family stories Wilson, Budge Grade 9 & 11 c2002 ... journey as he flees his home under the threat of war, and, guided by the memory of his mother, ...

  11. PDF Grade 11 November 2017 English First Additional Language P2

    SECTION C: SHORT STORIES Answer BOTH questions on the extracts. 4.1 'Pink Bow Tie' 17 14 AND 4.2 'The Love Potion' 18 16 SECTION D: POETRY Answer BOTH questions set on BOTH poems. 5.1 'The Chimney Sweeper' 18 18 AND 5.2 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' 17 19

  12. The Journey, Short Story

    The Journey. Shulamit Amir, Grade 11. Short Story. 2011. After lunch on an extremely hot day her family went for a walk and took their dogs Buddy and Zippi with them. They couldn't see the end of the fields, all they could see was wheat, empty fields with just dirt and a mirage of water. The sun on their pale skin was as hot as an oven on ...

  13. Eleventh Grade (Grade 11) Short Stories (Fiction) Questions

    The Haunted Palace. Grade 11 The Fall of the House of Usher. The narrator of The Fall of the House of Usher was not invited to Usher's house. True. False. Grade 11 A Sound of Thunder. In "A Sound of Thunder," what does the change in the spelling of TIME SAFARI signify? that they have arrived in the wrong year.

  14. Short Stories in English for Grade 11 FAL from 2016

    Title. Short Stories in English for Grade 11 FAL from 2016: Study GuideExam success literature study guide. Author. Carin Carstens. Publisher. Oxford University Press Southern Africa, 2016. ISBN. 0190415126, 9780190415129.

  15. Gr 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Lesson Plan Short Stories.pdf

    Gr 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Lesson Plan Short Stories.pdf. Gr 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Lesson Plan Short Stories.pdf — 12713 KB.

  16. GR 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Lesson Plan Short Stories

    Gr 11 Term 1 2019 EFAL Lesson Plan Short Stories (1) - Free ebook download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read book online for free.

  17. ENGLISH FAL Grade 11

    Grade 11 Economics- Economic Development Activity - 18/08/2021. 2 years, 8 months ago. Grade 10 Economics- industrial development 18/08/2021 ... 06Aug2021 - Short Story - The New Tribe 2 years, 9 months ago; PHSC GRADE 12(06/08/2021): PROBLEM SOLVING IN ELECTRICITY 2 years, 9 months ago; Groups. Newest | Active | Popular | Alphabetical ...

  18. Grades 11-12 Short Stories

    Grade: 11 Standards: 1. Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. ... Work on Short Story for Monday 11/2 -11/6 Final Touches on Personal Short Stories Presentations of Personal Short Story Presentations of Personal Short Story New Unit: Poetry

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  20. English Language Arts, Grade 11, The American Short Story

    Introduction to the Short Story. Lesson 1. Quick Write: The American Short Story. Lesson 2. Poe's The Tell-Tale Heart. Lesson 3. Point of View. Lesson 4. Developing Plot.

  21. The Journey , Short Story

    The Journey. Caitlin Selge, Grade 11. Short Story. 2019. Stepping off the train, the old woman slowly walked out onto the platform. The cool breeze tingling over her skin, as she breathed in the familiar scent of the town, she grew up in. Hugging her brown, leather briefcase to her chest, she went down the steps one at a time, finding herself ...

  22. The Love Potion Short Story Grade 11 Questions and Answers

    The Love Potion Short Story Grade 11 Analysis. In the quaint town of Groot Marico, amidst the enchanting beauty of the bush and the intriguing customs of the 1940s, a story of love and deception unfolds. Our narrator, Oom Schalk Lourens, takes us on a journey filled with humor, irony, and unexpected twists. The tale revolves around Gideon van ...

  23. ENGLISH FAL GR. 11 T2 W7 Intro to Short Story (THE LOVE POTION

    Intro to Short Story (THE LOVE POTION) - Author's background: Reading and Viewing ePortal Help Sign in Register. Home; Browse; Learners More. ONLINE LIBRARY ... 7 Grade 8 Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 BROADCASTS . Online, Radio & TV MY LEARNER DASHBOARD . GET Learner Dashboard ...