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Totnes (Devon)

Totnes claims to be one of the oldest boroughs in Devon. According to legend, Brutus of Troy sailed to these islands in 1200BC, founding the settlement at Totnes and also the kingdom of the Britons. The Brutus Stone, set in the pavement of the town's High Street, commemorates this event. However, it is more likely that these islands were named much later, possibly after a Roman Consul call Brutus, although there is no solid evidence for either theory.

The restored East Gate visible at the top of Fore Street

The ancient East Gate at the top of Fore St © TAB

The earliest recorded settlement began in the 10th-C and during the Middle Ages Totnes became a Borough town with a Merchant Guild, Norman Castle and a defensive wall sporting four gateways. Two of the town gates are still standing today. The North Gate near the castle and the East Gate, which has flight of steps leading up to Rampart Walk, which follows the line of the original medieval wall.

The town's attractive narrow main street has many interesting old buildings, among them the half-timber framed Merchant's House currently housing the town museum and the Guildhall , a charming ancient stone building.

The town centre boasts some of the nicest antique shops, silversmiths and boutiques in Devon. The narrow High Street is lined with 16-17th-C wealthy merchant's houses and old shops built of timber, brick and stone with colourful facades. At the top of the street is the arcaded Butterwalk, where its porticoed frontages provide a charming covered walkway. Mid way along the High Street is the parish church of St Mary, one of Devon's finest. It is mainly 15th-C with a tall west tower, arcades and an impressive roof. Its most outstanding feature is a superb stone screen (circa 1460), rivaled only by Exeter Cathedral.

Content by Steve B

Places of interest to visit in Totnes

Totnes castle.

Totnes castle mound

Opening times: Apr~Jun & Sep: daily 10-5; Jul~Aug: daily 10-6; Oct: daily 10-4 Admission Charge* Location: Castle, St, Totnes, Devon, TQ9 5NU - Tel: 01803 864406 - Website Facilities: Parking (70m charged), gift shop

Totnes Guildhall

Part of the original 11th-c Benedictine Priory of Totnes. It became the town's Guildhall in 1624 and is still in use today as a council chamber.

Opening times: Apr~Sep, Mon-Wed, 10am to 3pm Small Admission Charge Location: Ramparts Walk, Totnes, Devon, TQ9 5QH - Tel: 01803 862147 - Website Facilities: parking (50 metres)

Totnes Museum

Housed in a restored 16th-c Elizabethan merchant's house, the museum's exhibits cover social history and local archaeological. Includes an exhibition on Charles Babbage, the inventor of the first computer, who attended the King Edward VI Grammar School in Totnes for a time.

Opening times: Mar-Oct, Mon-Fri 10.30am to 5pm Admission Charge Location: 70 Fore St, Totnes, Devon, TQ9 5RU - Tel: 01803 863821 Website Facilities: shop

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Totnes Tourist Information Centre

Totnes Tourist Information Centre Picture 1

Opening Times

Contact details.

The Town Mill Coronation Road Totnes TQ9 5DF

Telephone: 01803 863168 Email: [email protected] Web: http://www.totnesinformation.co.uk/

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An insider’s guide to totnes.

Located halfway between Dartmoor and the sea is Totnes, a real gem in South Devon’s crown. Totnes is a thriving and quirky town with a unique feel and a friendly atmosphere, if you’re new to the region, here is your guide to all the things to see and do while in the town.

Firstly, let’s get you here!

Totnes is just a 40 minute drive from Plymouth and 50 minutes from Exeter and as it is a town that has sustainability at heart, has lots of public transport options. Getting here by train is just a 30 minute journey from Exeter, Plymouth and Torquay and the Gold Bus also runs on the half hour, taking just under an hour to and from Torquay and an hour exactly to Plymouth.

If you like the idea of taking the train but you want to arrive in style, the Dartmouth Steam and River Company operates boat trips to Totnes, departing from Dartmouth or hop aboard a steam train from Buckfastleigh – just visit the team at South Devon Railway.

Now you’re in Totnes, let’s take a look at  what to do and where to go.

Totnes is well known throughout Devon for being a Bohemian hub of culture and history. From the weekly markets to a host of adventure activities, there is something for everyone here. Why not start your day by meandering along the streets discovering the town’s historic buildings in the shadow of the town’s  motte and bailey castle,  which has overlooked Totnes since the Norman times. If history if your thing, a visit to the medieval  Dartington Hall and Gardens  is a must, it is just a short and pleasant walk from the town centre – ideal for a stroll on a sunny day.

While you’re having a wander around town, you’ll no doubt notice the wide range of independent shops dotted around. If you like to indulge in some retail therapy, then you will love the treasures that are on offer here. There’s a strong emphasis on local and handmade goods, with everything from fashion to fudge just waiting for you. On Fridays and Saturdays, the market square is a buzz with stalls where you’ll find an eclectic mix of items, including vintage collectibles and locally produced food and drink.

people shopping

Image: Visit Totnes

Speaking of food, foodies will love spending time in Totnes. The town is surrounded by some of the best of Devon’s countryside providing a bountiful harvest that supplies Totnes’ cafés and restaurants. Wherever you choose to stop for refreshments, you can be sure of local, seasonal produce, with everything from home made gelato to delicious vegan lunches and sweet treats.

It isn’t all leisurely activities on offer either, while a walk along the river and stopping for a quick bite is nice, there is plenty of adventure to be had here too. Why not hire a kayak or stand-up paddle board and experience a whole new side of Totnes? Or you could always join a guided canoe tour and see if you can spot the otters, seals and dolphins which make their way along the River Dart in the summer months. If you’ve not quite got your sea legs and fancy a nice wine as a reward, there are a host of riverside walks along to Dartington and Sharpham.

paddleboarding

For more inspiration on what to do, what’s on or to book activities, visit  www.visittotnes.co.uk  or follow them on Instagram and Facebook.

Visit Totnes

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18 top things to do in Totnes, South Devon (2024 guide)

If you’re looking for things to do in Totnes, this blog post is here to help!

I’m a Devon local, and historical Totnes is one of my favourite towns in the county. In fact, if it had a beach, I would have seriously thought about moving here!

Its history is palpable, but what makes the town shine today is its vibrant modern cultural scene. 

This south Devon town is inland, but it is still one of the most popular places in Devon. However, many tourists only see the castle and miss some of its other gems!

That’s why I’ve put this Totnes attractions list together – to help you see it all and make sure you don’t miss out on anything.

I guarantee that you’ll love Totnes!

Table of Contents

Things to do in Totnes

There’s so much to do in this historic market town, from exploring the historic castle to browsing its independent boutiques to taking in nature on the outskirts. Here are the best things to do in Totnes!

1. Totnes Castle

Totnes Castle, a norman castle against a cloudy sky

A traditional Norman motte and bailey castle, Totnes Castle is one of the most impressive Devon attractions .

I’d recommend making it your first point of call as soon as you get to the town!

Built shortly after the Norman conquest by Juhel, who was in William the Conquerer’s army, Totnes Castle is surrounded by a 13th-century shell keep. 

It passed into the ownership of Henry, son of the Earl of Cornwall then the de la Zouche family and later to Sir Richard Edgecombe of Cotehele.

Italian prisoners of war were held here in World War Two, and you can still see graffiti by them on the trees.

Other points of interest are the tranquil grounds with the historic moat and of course, the historic castle itself with amazing views over the town.

Click here to buy tickets for Totnes Castle or join English heritage here.

2. Totnes Museum

Elizabethan house museum

Want to get to know Totnes’s history a little better? 

Head to Totnes Museum .

Formerly known as Totnes Elizabethan House Museum because it is located in a Tudor house, this museum is a treasure trove of information about the historic town – and there’s plenty to learn.

It was once one of the richest towns in England, and legend has it that the founder of Britain first touched land here!

As well as exhibitions about the town and work from local artists, enjoy some historical features of the Totnes Elizabethan House Museum, including its kitchen, a nursery and corridors.

There are also areas that replicate a Victorian pharmacy and shop.

Finally, visit the Babbage Room to learn about Charles Babbage, an inventor who is thought to be the father of computing, who studied in Totnes.

3. Totnes Fashion & Textile Museum

The Totnes Fashion & Textile Museum is another place to visit in Totnes on a rainy day – or anytime!

With exhibitions ranging from period costumes to fashion in the 21st century, it’s a must-visit place for any stylish tourists – or people who are interested in how fashion has changed through the centuries.

Totnes Fashion Museum is open from Tuesday to Friday in the summer, from 11:00am to 5:00pm. If you want to visit the museum at another time, you can make an appointment.

4. Totnes Guildhall 

The exterior of Totnes Guildhall

See history come alive at Totnes Guildhall.  

This site began life as an 11th-century Benedictine priory, then turned into a medieval hall.

The guildhall has been at the heart of life in the town for centuries and is well worth visiting while you’re here!

It was originally built in 1088, but most of it was destroyed under the dissolution of the monasteries.

However, the guildhall was built onto the remains in 1553, and it has since been used for multiple purposes.

Over the centuries, it has been Totnes’ goal, a school, a magistrates court and is now the Council Chambers for Totnes Town Council.

Oliver Cromwell even plotted some of the Civil War here!

It’s usually open Monday to Friday in the summer months (check out up-to-date opening times here) .

5. See Brutus Stone

Brutus Stone, allegedly where the founder of Britain first touched the shore.

The whole of Britain was allegedly founded in Totnes!

Brutus of Troy apparently left Troy when it fell and travelled to the UK, becoming the first official Briton.

Brutus Stone allegedly marks where he took his first step onto British soil – he’s quoted to say “Here I stand and here I rest. And this town shall be called Totnes”. 

Not many people believe this story, largely because Totnes’ locatio n is not by the sea and the stone is up a steep hill, much further than river levels have ever risen – but it’s a quirky attraction to check out!

You’ll find it on Fore Street, next to The Wild Fig Cafe (which is an excellent spot for lunch). 

6. Walk under East Gate

East Gate in Totnes, the old entrance to the Medieval City.

Arching over Fore Street, East Gate used to be the entrance to the Medieval town of Totnes. 

Unfortunatley, a large fire in 1990 damaged it, so not all that much of its Medieval exterior remains, but it has been well-restored since.

7. Shop at the many independent stores

Popular Devon store Roly's Fudge in Totnes

Whether you’re Christmas shopping or looking for home decorations, Totnes is a hive of independent shops and boutiques. 

Many of the stores in Fore Street and beyond are independent or smaller brands.

My favourites include: 

  • Roly’s Fudge Pantry : An establishment in Devon, Roly’s Fudge offers traditional West Country fudge – if you want an edible souvenir, this is your place!
  • China Blue : A popular pottery shop (it’s a hit with kids!) where you can decorate your own china. 
  • Out of the Blue Gift Shop : A family-run store where you’ll find all sorts of one of a kind presents and mementoes. 
  • Revival : A fantastic store for fashionistas selling new and second-hand clothing. 
  • Castle Books : In the shadow of Totnes Castle sits Castle Books, a lovely second hand bookstore.

8. Take a ride on the South Devon Railway

The South Devon Railway (not to be confused with the Dartmouth Steam Railway) connects Buckfastleigh to Totnes Riverside, traversing through some of the most beautiful scenery in Devon.

This traditional Great Western Railway steam train feels like a step back in time.

Take in vistas of Dartmoor and the lush River Dart as you chug along. 

In Buckfastleigh, browse their museum, display of steam and diesel locomotives, and the gift and model shop.

You can also visit Dartmoor Otters and Buckfast Butterflies , which is near Buckfastleigh station, or walk the mile to Buckfast Abbey , a fascinating working abbey that’s famous for being where Buckfast Wine is created.

The train also stops at Staverton, a country town that looks like a time capsule from a century ago.

Here, there are some beautiful riverside walks and a 15th-century bridge. 

Check out more information on the South Devon Railway website.

9. Take a boat trip to Dartmouth

Beautiful views of the river with the bright green trees on the side of the bank

The River Dart connects Dartmouth and Totnes, and you can explore it with the Dartmoor River Boat Company.

This cruise covers nine miles and takes 90 minutes each way.

On it, pass by Agatha Christie’s Greenway Estate and the Sharpham Estate and vineyards.

With an interesting commentary learn funny stories from villages like Dittisham (where Kate Winslet has a house) and Stoke Gabriel. 

In Dartmouth, see the castle and harbour, returning to Totnes either via the cruise or by taking a bus.

You could also purchase a Round Robin Ticket from the Dartmouth Steam Railway and River Boat Company which includes the boat between Totnes and Dartmouth, a ferry from Dartmouth to Kingswear, the Kingswear to Paignton Steam Train (click here for my full guide) and a bus transfer from Paignton to Totnes.

10. Explore St Mary’s Church

The inside of St Mary's church, a grand place of worship in Totnes

Tucked away to the side of Fore Street, you’ll find St Mary’s Church.

The present building dates back 500 years, but a monastery and an even earlier church occupied this site 1,000 years ago.

In 1088, St. Mary’s began its life as a local cell for French Benedictine monks, and it was redeveloped in the 13th and 15th centuries. The rood screen, which is still present in the church today, was made from Beer Stone.

The dissolution of the monasteries in the 1500s meant the destruction of many of the churches decorations, but it was then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries.

It remains one of the most fascinating historic buildings in Totnes and is home to the elaborate Heritage Map of Totnes on the floor of the North Aisle, a vintage-looking map that depicts various locations that are important to the town’s history.

11. Follow the Totnes Town Trail

Dart town trail

Learn about Totnes’s history and heritage by taking the Totnes Town Trail. 

This is a free self-guided walking tour run by Visit Totnes with stops at some of the town’s most interesting places. 

The trail covers significant points, including:

  • Totnes Castle, the main landmark of Totnes town.
  • St Mary’s Church which was part of the Benedictine priory of Totnes, but was rebuilt in the 15th century.
  • The guildhall which has a fascinating 1000 years of history.
  • Brutus Stone, where Totnes was allegedly founded!
  • Seven Stars Hotel dates back to the 17th century but was built on the site of a medieval inn.
  • Wills Obelisk, which is commemorated to William Wills, who explored Australia and was born in Totnes town.
  • Leechwell, which is a natural spring with healing properties.

Here’s the Visit Totnes website with the route instructions and information .

12. Hike on the Dart Valley Trail

One of Totnes’s main draws is its proximity to the Dart Valley Trail.

This is a walking route from Totnes to Dartmouth, passing through beautiful riverside scenery as it winds down the banks. 

The entire walk is 9 miles or 14.5 kilometres and is classed as ‘hard’.

If you don’t want to do the full distance, you can do a circular walk around Totnes – here are some directions for such a walk.

Cycling is also permitted in some sections.

If you do the full hike, you can easily return to Totnes by bus.

13. Dine at one of the waterfront cafes

Waterfront Totnes

One of the best ways to soak Totnes’s glorious waterfront in is to dine at cafes and restaurants along the river.

Waterside Bistro is a lovely little tapas and seafood restaurant.

It has a wonderful courtyard overlooking the river and inside seating for when the weather isn’t so good.

You can pop into Waterside Bistro for a light bite, a drink or a full meal.

For more details and reservations, click here.

14. Totnes Good Food Market

Another way to enjoy Totnes’ fantastic food scene is by going to the Totnes Good Food Market !

As the name suggests, this is a chance to enjoy some delicious local food.

It runs every third Sunday of the month and has 60+ stalls from Devon and the West Country, serving delicious cheese, chutney, cider, jam… and plenty more!

If you are in Totnes when it is on, it is not to be missed!

15. Sharpham Vineyard

As well as lots of delicious food, there is local wine near Totnes!

If you want to try some English wines, I recommend visiting Sharpham Vineyard , which is a 13-minute drive from Totnes centre (for public transport, you’ll need to take the Gold Bus towards Paignton to Parkers Arms Walk and then the 125 towards Stoke Gabriel to Sandridge Barton – this will take around an hour). 

Sharpham wine was one of the first English wines to be produced in this area – the vineyard dates back to 1981!

You may think that England doesn’t have much to offer when it comes to wine – but the cooler climate of South Devon has a longer growing season and can produce some excellent wine varieties!

Sharpham has won countless awards for its sparkling, red, rose and white wines. They also make delicious cheese.

Simply take a walk through their vineyard, enjoying the scenery, or do a self-guided wine-tasting flight, a guided tasting or a tour and tasting. 

All experiences apart from the independent walk need to be booked in advance .

16. Berry Pomeroy Castle

The gatehouse at Berry Pomeroy castle

The nearby Berry Pomeroy Castle is another English Heritage property that is just a five-minute drive from Totnes town centre.

Parts of Berry Pomeroy date back to the 15th century when it belonged to the Pomeroy family, but the castle you see today mainly dates back to the 16th century when it belonged to the Seymour family.

After the death of Henry VIII and the succession of Edward VI, the Seymours were perhaps the most influential family in the country.

Jane Seymour was Edward VI’s late mother, and her brothers used this connection to influence the young king, who was only nine when he began his reign.

Although this castle was reconstructed in 1560 after Edward VI died and during the reign of Catholic Mary I, the castle still exudes a lot of the wealth you’d expect from such an influential family. In fact, the Seymours planned to make it the most magnificent manor house in Devon.

Its ambitions were never properly met, and it was all but abandoned by the 18th century.

This resulted in it becoming a breeding ground for ghost stories – which you’ll be able to hear about on the audio tour!

It is set in stunning gardens and is well worth the trip from Totnes.

Click here to buy tickets for Berry Pomeroy Castle.

Like Totnes Castle, Berry Pomeroy is also managed by the English Heritage. If you visit more than five castles in a year, I would highly recommend getting an English Heritage membership.

You can click here for more information.

17. Dartington Estate

Dartington Estate is a country estate close to Totnes with lush grounds to explore.

These gardens are Grade II* listed and have an impressive history spanning back over 1000 years.

Encompassing 26 acres, here you’ll find sculptures, ancient trees and rare plants.

It’s a lovely place to go for a walk near Totnes!

It’s a 7-minute drive from Totnes, or the gold bus goes most of the way.

18. Go on a day trip

The back of Golden Hind Museum Ship against the blue water, in Brixham.

As well as these attractions in and around Totnes, there are a few other excellent day trip destinations a little further afield!

These include:

  • Plymouth (40 minute drive/ 30 minute train ride): Learn about the Mayflower, enjoy the coastal scenery or take a boat up the River Tamar, which separates Devon and Cornwall. Check out my full guide.
  • Exeter (45 minute drive/ 30 minute train ride): Visit for the majestic cathedral, the beautiful quay and excellent food scene. Here’s my full guide.
  • Dartmoor National Park (20+ minute drive/ 20 minute bus ride to Buckfastleigh): Hike on wild moorland to magnificent tors, look out for ponies or drive through charming villages like Widecombe in the Moor. Here’s my full list of things to do on the moor.
  • Dartmouth (30 minute drive/ 40 minute bus ride/ 45 minutes on the sightseeing cruise): One of Devon’s most scenic harbour towns, visit Dartmouth Castle, enjoy the lush coastline and learn about its Royal connections! Here’s my full guide.
  • Torbay (20 minute drive/ 25 minute bus ride): Visit Paignton and Torquay for attractions like Kent’s Cavern Caves, Torre Abbey and Bygones – in my opinion it’s the best place in Devon for family-friendly attractions. 
  • Brixham (30 minute drive): A picturesque harbour town with plenty of naval history and the striking Berry Head Nature Reserve. Check out my full guide.

Now you know the best places to visit in Totnes!

Hopefully, this list of things to do in Totnes has helped you plan your trip to this historic English town! 

Totnes is a wonderful blend of independent shopping, a compelling history and has plenty of family-friendly activities. 

It’s definitely worth a day trip if you’re staying elsewhere in South Devon, or you could base here and spend some time exploring the town and neighbouring region more intimately. 

Whatever you choose, I guarantee you’ll love Totnes! 

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Totnes, Devon

The town of Totnes is located at the highest navigable point of the River Dart, well inland from the sea. It has been a port since at least the medieval period.

Totnes Castle

Totnes Castle sits high on a hill above the town, commanding the approaches from three valleys. One of the best surviving examples of a Norman motte and bailey castle, Totnes was first erected in the 11th century as a wooden palisade on a high mound.

Extensive remodelling in the 13th and 14th centuries created a circular stone keep atop the mound, surrounded by a curtain wall. The keep has survived in excellent condition, though the outer defences have been left to crumble.

Just outside the castle is a stone arch over the roadway. This is all that remains of the medieval North Gate to the town.

Totnes Castle

St Mary's Church

Set back from Fore Street is the attractive 15th-century church of St Mary , made of red sandstone. It is probably the third church on this site. St Mary's boasts a richly carved Tudor doorway and a magnificent stone rood screen and pulpit.

By the north edge of the churchyard is the house of Nicholas Bell, a wealthy Tudor merchant. Bell's widow married Thomas Bodley in 1586, and Bodley used her money to found the Bodleian Library in Oxford .

North of the church is the Butterwalk, a covered arcade dating to the 16th century and built to provide shelter for dairy stalls. The Totnes Fashion and Textiles Museum occupies Bogan House, the finest Tudor merchant's house in Totnes.

The Guildhall

Behind St Mary's church is the Tudor guildhall, open to the public and still used for town council meetings. The Guildhall was built in 1553 from the ruins of an 11th-century priory founded by Judhael, the Norman knight who built Totnes Castle. The Guildhall has served as a meeting place for civic events, a gaol, and a courthouse.

15th-century screen in St Mary's Church

Perhaps the most distinctive historical building in Totnes is this attractive archway spanning Fore Street. This was the eastern gateway to the medieval town of Totnes. It was badly damaged by fire in 1990 but was carefully restored to its original design.

The Brutus Stone

Set into the pavement at 51/53 Fore Street is a small granite boulder known as the Brutus Stone. The stone is said to mark the spot where Brutus of Troy, the mythical founder of Britain, first stepped ashore. According to legend Brutus escaped the fall of Troy and sailed off to the British Isles where he became the first Briton.

While legends of Trojan warriors seem farfetched to historians, it seems likely that the Brutus Stone did mark a traditional meeting place for the Saxon witan, the governing council of Totnes. During the Saxon and medieval periods the street level was much lower than it is now, so the stone was probably a local landmark and gathering place. It is still the focus for civic ceremonies.

The Brutus Stone

Elizabethan House

On the south side of Fore Street is the Totnes Museum, housed in a picturesque timber-framed building. The museum tells the rich history of Totnes and the surrounding region. The building was erected in 1575 for a cloth merchant named Walter Kellond and is an excellent example of a traditional timber-framed Elizabethan house. Behind the house is a freestanding kitchen and buttery linked to the house by a gallery.

Royal Seven Stars Hotel

At the bottom of Fore Street stands the Royal Seven Stars Hotel, a historic 17th-century courtyard inn possibly built by George Rooke, Mayor of Totnes in 1685/86. Author Daniel Defoe stayed at the hotel during his travels in the West Country. The hotel may stand on the site of a medieval inn.

On a traffic island opposite the Seven Stars is an obelisk acting as a memorial to Totnes native William John Wills, erected in 1864. Wills was the first white man to cross Australia in 1861. He died on the return leg of his journey.

The restored East Gate

Across from the Wills memorial is Totnes Bridge, built in 1828 by Charles Fowler to replace an earlier bridge. You can still see the foundations of the earlier bridge at low tide. A few steps north of the bridge is Town Mill, a restored Victorian mill housing a collection of archival photos depicting life in Totnes during the 19th century.

Our family has visited Totnes on several occasions and always enjoy returning. There are so many historic buildings packed within a relatively compact area of the town centre. Parking can be a challenge at times but there is a public car park off Coronation Road near the bridge and a small car park on North Street near the castle.

The Guildhall, c. 1553

Related: Totnes Town Council website

About Totnes Address: Totnes, Devon, England Attraction Type: Town Location map OS: SX799 604 Photo Credit: David Ross and Britain Express

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What to do in Totnes, South Devon's quirkiest corner

​Decamp to the South Devon town for quirky counterculture, organic pubs and outdoor adventures on the edge of Dartmoor.

Historic Totnes may lay claim to being the second-oldest borough in England — with a Norman castle, Tudor-era covered walkway and Grade I-listed church to testify — but its feet stand firmly in the New Age. Pioneers in community-minded living, Totnes’s residents have created a town that prizes mindfulness before modernity — and the happy byproduct is a high street packed with fair-priced, plant-based restaurants, quirky bookshops, thriving community centres and art galleries showcasing local talent. Wellness retreats are something of a local pastime here, with the respected institutions of the Sharpham Trust and Dartington Trust satiating demand with a year-round calendar of restful, creative activities.

Totnes has plenty to offer beyond its cultural clout, too. Situated midway up the River Dart, the town is just a short hop east from the wilds of Dartmoor National Park, and west from the English Riviera at Paignton. So, whether you’d like to spot seals on a canoeing adventure or cycle through forested valleys, there’s a natural playground within easy reach.

Totnes has been shaped by two charitable estates that have, over the past 100 years, helped to instil the bohemian reputation that the town enjoys today. They are the Dartington and Sharpham trusts, connected to each other by a serene, five-mile walk along wildflower-speckled banks of the River Dart.

At Dartington, explore the Grade I-listed halls — built by John Holland (the half-brother of Richard II) in the 14th century — before making your way to the gardens, a feat of landscaping design credited mostly to Dorothy Elmhirst, the site’s philanthropic former co-owner. The estate has been a driving force in public education in Totnes since the Elmhirsts bought the crumbling estate in 1925, and remains a campus of learning in the arts, ecology and social justice today.  

Maurice and Ruth Ash, late owners of The Sharpham Trust, had a vision for stately Sharpham House as an experiential centre of spiritual awakening — the couple are credited as having introduced Buddhism and Indian philosophy to this corner of the UK. Today, a string of events, retreats and courses on the estate reflect this legacy, covering everything from meditation and forest bathing to yoga and birdwatching.

If you’re after some retail therapy, head to Fore Street, the beating heart of Totnes. The street climbs gently uphill from the river, passing the slate-hung facades of numerous independent shops, and at its peak is the Totnes Castle keep. You could lose an entire day browsing for goodies along this handsome high street, from local Ticklemore cheese at Ben’s Farm Shop to tomes on pagan folklore at Arcturus Books . Don’t leave without a taste of the organic ice cream at gelateria Delphini’s , made fresh by Johan every day.

A grey harbour seal pokes its nose out of the water.

Where to eat

It’s organic-everything at The Bull Inn . Opened in 2019 by Geetie Singh-Watson — a restaurateur who launched Britain’s first certified organic pub, The Duke of Cambridge in North London — the inn has earned its green stripes with a menu that puts locally sourced, seasonal vegetables first. Think crispy purple-sprouting broccoli doused in whipped tahini and za’atar, or pollock served with romesco, chard and wild garlic. The meat options meet Geetie’s exacting animal-welfare standards, too.  

If your visit coincides with the first Saturday of the month, head to the Totnes United Free Church for a pay-what-you-feel lunch. It’s where a friendly collective of volunteers gather to cook sustainably produced and organic food donated by locals. Money raised is donated to charities in the area.

Flowing from Dartmoor National Park to the sea at Dartmouth, passing little else but small villages and sprawling wilderness, the River Dart snakes through Totnes. Looming over its course are valleys thick with ancient sessile oak woods whose appearance changes dramatically through the day, be they shrouded in morning mist or tinged umber in the evening sun. Discover the landscape and its lore on a waterborne adventure with Canoe Adventures , and keep a lookout for seals which can be spotted along the river up to the weir at Totnes.  

Everything from the virtues of nettles to the pitfalls of lords and ladies is explained in colourful detail on a woodland foraging tour at The Sharpham Trust. Led by a qualified botanist, the full-day activity covers an exploration of the estate’s wild grounds, as you learn to correctly identify native plants and get to know their nutrition profile. Cook your frondy finds in the outdoor kitchen, where you can share stories with new friends. From £55 per person.

Where to stay

Bed down in a lovingly renovated, 600-year-old building at The Old Forge , once a blacksmith and carpenter’s workshop. Rooms are quintessentially English in style, with their creamy colour schemes, plush cushions and floral touches. A cheery welcome is guaranteed from owner-manager Julie George, whose enthusiasm for the local area permeates even the hotel’s chunky stone walls. From £140, B & B.  

The Bull Inn is ideally located at the top of the town with easy access to the shops and restaurants. Its rustic, limewashed rooms are tastefully decorated with embroidered lace curtains and unique artwork, with no throwaway, single-use hotel items in sight. From £145, B & B.

Published in the Jul/Aug 2022 issue of National Geographic Traveller (UK)

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Successful Summer for the Tourist Information Centre

The Visit Totnes Tourist Information Centre in the Market Square has now closed for winter after a busy summer season. Open from April to the end of October, the team responded to nearly 2,900 enquiries for information on things to do in Totnes, including places to stay or eat, local walks, boat trips and family activities. Of the total 2,878 enquiries, 2,616 were in-person visits to the information centre. The number of enquiries in person, on the phone and via email was higher than 2021’s figure of 2,431.

Cllr Emily Price, Mayor of Totnes said: “The visitor economy is tremendously important to our town, helping us to buck the downward trend experienced by many high-streets and instead thrive. Following a challenging couple of years thanks to COVID, it’s been great to see overseas visitors returning to our town as well as an influx of staycationers and local day-trippers. The Town Council is committed to supporting our local businesses by promoting tourism. Through a dedicated website, social media, printed leaflets and maps, events, and our tourist information office we are working hard to increase visitor numbers.”

The Information Centre will reopen at the start of April 2023 but essential, up-to-date visitor information is still available online at www.visittotnes.co.uk and at the various information displays around the town.

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What to do in Totnes, South Devon's quirkiest corner

Totnes has been shaped by two charitable estates that have, over the past 100 years, helped to instil the bohemian reputation that the town enjoys today. 

Historic Totnes may lay claim to being the second-oldest borough in England — with a Norman castle, Tudor-era covered walkway and Grade I-listed church to testify — but its feet stand firmly in the New Age. Pioneers in community-minded living, Totnes’s residents have created a town that prizes mindfulness before modernity — and the happy byproduct is a high street packed with fair-priced, plant-based restaurants, quirky bookshops, thriving community centres and art galleries showcasing local talent. Wellness retreats are something of a local pastime here, with the respected institutions of the Sharpham Trust and Dartington Trust satiating demand with a year-round calendar of restful, creative activities.

Totnes has plenty to offer beyond its cultural clout, too. Situated midway up the River Dart, the town is just a short hop east from the wilds of Dartmoor National Park, and west from the English Riviera at Paignton. So, whether you’d like to spot seals on a canoeing adventure or cycle through forested valleys, there’s a natural playground within easy reach.

Totnes has been shaped by two charitable estates that have, over the past 100 years, helped to instil the bohemian reputation that the town enjoys today. They are the Dartington  and Sharpham  trusts, connected to each other by a serene, five-mile walk along wildflower-speckled banks of the River Dart.

At Dartington, explore the Grade I-listed halls — built by John Holland (the half-brother of Richard II) in the 14th century — before making your way to the gardens, a feat of landscaping design credited mostly to Dorothy Elmhirst, the site’s philanthropic former co-owner. The estate has been a driving force in public education in Totnes since the Elmhirsts bought the crumbling estate in 1925, and remains a campus of learning in the arts, ecology and social justice today. 

Maurice and Ruth Ash, late owners of The Sharpham Trust, had a vision for stately Sharpham House as an experiential centre of spiritual awakening — the couple are credited as having introduced Buddhism and Indian philosophy to this corner of the UK. Today, a string of events, retreats and courses on the estate reflect this legacy, covering everything from meditation and forest bathing to yoga and birdwatching.

If you’re after some retail therapy, head to Fore Street, the beating heart of Totnes. The street climbs gently uphill from the river, passing the slate-hung facades of numerous independent shops, and at its peak is the Totnes Castle keep. You could lose an entire day browsing for goodies along this handsome high street, from local Ticklemore  cheese at Ben’s Farm Shop to tomes on pagan folklore at Arcturus Books . Don’t leave without a taste of the organic ice cream at gelateria Delphini’s , made fresh by Johan every day.

totnes tourist information office

Grey and harbour seals can be spotted along the River Dart.

Where to eat

It’s organic-everything at The Bull Inn . Opened in 2019 by Geetie Singh-Watson — a restaurateur who launched Britain’s first certified organic pub, The Duke of Cambridge in North London — the inn has earned its green stripes with a menu that puts locally sourced, seasonal vegetables first. Think crispy purple-sprouting broccoli doused in whipped tahini and za’atar, or pollock served with romesco, chard and wild garlic. The meat options meet Geetie’s exacting animal-welfare standards, too. 

If your visit coincides with the first Saturday of the month, head to the Totnes United Free Church for a pay-what-you-feel lunch. It’s where a friendly collective of volunteers gather to cook sustainably produced and organic food donated by locals. Money raised is donated to charities in the area.

Flowing from Dartmoor National Park to the sea at Dartmouth, passing little else but small villages and sprawling wilderness, the River Dart snakes through Totnes. Looming over its course are valleys thick with ancient sessile oak woods whose appearance changes dramatically through the day, be they shrouded in morning mist or tinged umber in the evening sun. Discover the landscape and its lore on a waterborne adventure with Canoe Adventures , and keep a lookout for seals which can be spotted along the river up to the weir at Totnes. 

Everything from the virtues of nettles to the pitfalls of lords and ladies is explained in colourful detail on a woodland foraging tour at The Sharpham Trust. Led by a qualified botanist, the full-day activity covers an exploration of the estate’s wild grounds, as you learn to correctly identify native plants and get to know their nutrition profile. Cook your frondy finds in the outdoor kitchen, where you can share stories with new friends. From £55 per person. 

Where to stay

Bed down in a lovingly renovated, 600-year-old building at The Old Forge , once a blacksmith and carpenter’s workshop. Rooms are quintessentially English in style, with their creamy colour schemes, plush cushions and floral touches. A cheery welcome is guaranteed from owner-manager Julie George, whose enthusiasm for the local area permeates even the hotel’s chunky stone walls. From £140, B&B. 

The Bull Inn is ideally located at the top of the town with easy access to the shops and restaurants. Its rustic, limewashed rooms are tastefully decorated with embroidered lace curtains and unique artwork, with no throwaway, single-use hotel items in sight. From £145, B&B.

Published in the Jul/Aug 2022 issue of National Geographic Traveller (UK)

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Things to do in Totnes

10 Best Things to do in Totnes, Devon

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In my opinion, Devon is underrated. While people flock to the big cities like London . Cambridge , or Oxford , or even Cornwall during the summer months, small, gorgeous towns like Totnes often slip under the radar. Since I’ve explored this beautiful part of the UK , I know first-hand that there are so many wonderful things to do in Totnes. 

The Museum at Totnes is one of the best things to do in Totnes

The charming town was one of the most historical places we visited in Devon. But, Totnes seamlessly combines its rich history with contemporary charm. You’ll find architectural gems, quaint cobbled streets, and a hilltop castle overlooking the town. But you’ll also find vibrant restaurants, trendy bars, the cutest shops. and an enticing selection of cafes, perfect for grabbing a cream tea and sitting outside in the sunshine. 

Totnes

Totnes itself doesn’t sit on the coastline, but it’s a stone’s throw from the sandy shores of Torquay and the peaceful Dartmouth Estuary. Furthermore, a short drive north will reveal the enchanting Dartmoor National Park, ideal for outdoor lovers. In essence, a stay in Totnes provides a tantalising glimpse into the array of experiences that South Devon has to offer.

Where to Stay in Totnes

We stayed in Harvest Hut by Unique Hideaways and it was an absolute dream. 

To be completely transparent, this was my first time glamping. I’d been camping in tents a few times when I was growing up. But after too many times getting lost in the dark trying to find a bathroom and the lack of a hot shower in the morning, I decided camping wasn’t for me. 

Harvest Hut in Totnes, Devon

However, my time at Harvest Hut has convinced me that glamping is the best of both worlds: you get the privacy and convenience of a hotel room, with the stunning surroundings and remote location of traditional camping. Plus, the unique and quirky accommodation just added to the overall charm of the whole experience.

About Harvest Hut

Harvest Hut is a shepherd’s hut located on Collaton Farm, about a 15-minute drive from the heart of Totnes. Its remote location means you’ll need your own vehicle to stay here as you have to navigate a few one-lane roads to reach the farm. But, if anything this made it even better.

Our welcome pack when we arrived at Harvest Hut

Here, there were no intrusive street lights glaring through the windows, no cacophony of cars or the distant hum of the motorway, and no disturbances from people outside our room. It was completely peaceful, which was exactly what we needed.

Harvest Hut from above

The hut itself is gorgeous! The actual chassis is almost 100 years old and has been artfully decorated into a cosy and surprisingly spacious retreat. As you walk in, you’ll enter the main living area which has a comfortable sofa, table and chairs next to the window (which offers views over the countryside), a wine cooler, and an indoor fireplace.

Relaxing at Harvest Hut

Along one wall, there was a fully equipped kitchen and also a modern bathroom with a lovely hot shower. Tucked at the back was an enormous double bed – one of the largest and most comfortable beds I’ve stayed in.

Outside the Hut

The outside of the hut was equally fantastic. There was a deck outside the front doors, with a BBQ, seating area and, the best part, a wood-fired hot tub! If you’ve ever been glamping with a hot tub , you’ll know just how luxurious this can be.

totnes tourist information office

The owners graciously heated this for us when we arrived. It was lovely to unwind in the warm water with a glass of wine. Around the front of the hut, there was a second seating area and an open fire pit, perfect for relaxing in the evening and toasting marshmallows.

The fire pit at Harvest Hut

We spent several perfect nights at Harvest Hut—soaking in the hot tub with a glass of wine, cosying up on the sofa in front of the fireplace listening to the soothing patter of rain, and toasting marshmallows over the open fire.

The views from Harvest Hut

It stands out as one of the most unique and delightful places I’ve ever stayed. If you’ve ever been unsure about glamping (as I was), a stay with Unique Hideaways is sure to change your mind. 

For more glampsites in Devon, click here

The 10 Best Things to Do in Totnes

This gorgeous part of Southern England was one of the most interesting towns we explored in Devon. Here are the 10 best things to do in Totnes.

1. Explore Totnes Castle

Perched on top of a hill, this English Heritage site offers a fascinating glimpse of Totnes’s history while providing stunning views over the town. The castle is a prime example of a Norman motte and bailey castle. It’s one of the best preserved in England and dates back to the 14th century. 

Totnes Castle

There’s a deep moat surrounding the castle. But, what sets it apart is that the earth excavated from the moat was used to create the mount the castle is sitting on. The mound is entirely man-made and an integral part of the castle’s defences. 

Totnes Castle is one of the best things to do in Totnes

You can go for a walk around the moat and also explore the castle itself. If I’m totally honest, inside the castle, there’s not a lot to see. It’s simply an empty circular room. But, you can climb onto the upper parts and walk around them for panoramic views over Totnes and the surrounding countryside.

The castle costs £6.50 to enter, but if you’re an English Heritage member, you can get in for free.

2. Visit the Totnes Elizabethan House Museum

Considering how interesting this was, we were surprised that it was completely free! Located in the centre of Totnes, this museum is housed in an ancient Elizabethan merchant’s house.

Totnes Museum is one of the best things to do in Totnes

The building itself is really pretty with lots of exposed timber beams. When you’re walking around, you have to be quite careful of the uneven floorboards and twisting staircases. 

Elizabethan House Museum

The museum is set across 3 floors. You’ll find all sorts of artefacts and items, from a row of mahogany grandfather clocks to a replica of an original bedroom, complete with an authentic steel bedpan. There was also an outdoor courtyard with a half-timbered cottage and a fragrant herb garden.

3. See St. Mary’s Church

Easily spotted from the battlements of Totnes Castle, St Mary’s Church is a pretty parish church nestled in the heart of the town. It’s a Grade I listed building and it’s easy to see just how historic it is.

St Mary's Church

The inside is just as pretty as the outside with colourful stained glass windows and wooden pews. Plus, the gardens outside are also a great spot to relax, with benches and blossoming flower beds. 

4. Browse Totnes Market

We were fortunate to explore Totnes on one of its bustling market days as it’s easily one of the best things to do in Totnes. The market is fantastic.

You’ll find stalls selling all sorts from homemade wooden tables, to elaborately embroidered clothes. We saw both local and international food stalls, hand-crafted housewares and wicker baskets, fresh fruit and vegetables, and assorted jars of honey and jam.

The Market

It was also a surprisingly large market, with lots of stalls to look through. We overheard numerous enthusiastic vendors discussing their wares, all of which appeared to be of exceptionally high quality. If you enjoy browsing through homemade goodies and sampling delicious food, definitely visit Totnes market if you’re in South Devon.

Top Tip: Totnes holds its market on Fridays and Saturdays, so if you want to visit, be sure to plan your trip around this.

5. Explore the Totnes Guildhall

Following the signs in the historical museum or simply walking through St Mary’s Church will lead you straight to Totnes Guildhall.

Totnes Guildhall

Much to our surprise, this was also a completely free thing to do in Totnes. It was incredibly interesting and full of history. 

Totnes Guildhall is one of the best things to do in Totnes

You can see the actual Guildhall itself, which is still used today. There’s also a section at the back that’s almost like a mini museum. Here, you’ll find information about the Guildhall’s history, an ancient prison cell where people were once held captive, and a little tour of Totnes through the ages. It’s fascinating and well worth a visit.

6. Visit the East Gate

When you’re walking through the centre of Totnes, you can’t miss the East Gate. This historical structure, once a gateway to the medieval town, played a crucial role in Totnes’s defences. 

It was originally built as part of the city walls and then re-fronted in the 19th century and used as a Mechanic’s Institute. Today, it’s more of a symbol of the past, and a great excuse to explore the charming streets of the old town.

The East Gate in Totnes

To reach the gate, you’ll have to pass through many of the town’s most fantastic shops and restaurants including Roly’s Fudge Pantry (a must-visit if you love sweet treats).

7. Take a Trip to Berry Pomeroy Castle

Berry Pomeroy Castle was one of the most beautiful castles I visited in Devon and easily one of the best things to do in Totnes. This is another English Heritage site, so, free to enter if you’re a member, and £7.50 if you’re not. It’s also said to be one of the most haunted castles in England. 

The beautiful Berry Pomeroy House is one of the best things to do in Totnes

Tucked away in a secluded woodland valley, this elaborate house was originally built in the 15th century for the Pomeroy family. It was then taken over by Lord Seymour, who aspired to make it the most magnificent house in Devon—until his finances dwindled, leaving the house abandoned for hundreds of years.

Berry Pomeroy House is one of the best things to do in Totnes

Now, the once-majestic mansion stands as a weathered ruin. But, this makes it all the more charming. You can meander through the ancient chambers and passageways, see the long gallery (which was once the biggest in England), and speculate about the house’s haunted history.

Top Tip: The way the sunlight filters through the brickwork and the lush greenery that has reclaimed the ruin makes this a wonderful spot for photography

8. Explore Dartmoor National Park

Just a short drive north of Totnes will bring you to Dartmoor National Park, one of Devon’s most picturesque regions. Dartmoor is a haven for outdoor lovers with a network of hiking trails , cascading waterfalls (including the tallest waterfall in England), and deep, picturesque gorges.

Lydford Gorge in Dartmoor

You could easily spend days (probably weeks) exploring Dartmoor. But if you only have time for a day trip from Totnes, I recommend choosing between Lydford Gorge, Canonteign Falls, or Brentor Church.

Top Tip: Visiting this church at sunset will give you absolutely stunning views over Dartmoor.

9. Visit the South Devon Railway

One of the best things to do in South Devon is to visit the railway. This historic locomotive offers a stylish and nostalgic means of exploring the Devonshire countryside. It was built in 1872 and is one of the longest-established steam trains in the region.

The railway offers a range of activities both onboard and off. You can go on a 14-mile round trip on the steam train through the valley of the River Dart. You can also enjoy a range of train-based experience days and explore the museum and model train shop on site. They also have riverside walking routes on site and beautifully manicured gardens. 

If you’re seeking a more unique experience, the railway also hosts special themed days on the trains. There’s a polar experience in winter and a murder mystery experience for Halloween .

10. Take a Day Trip to Torquay

Last but not least, if you’re craving the Devonshire coastline, Torquay is an excellent choice. One of the most popular seaside towns in Devon, Torquay effortlessly blends vibrant urban energy with stunning sandy beaches and a plethora of captivating activities. 

Torquay is one of the best day trips from Totnes

You’ll find prehistoric caves, a model village, a towering Ferris wheel (if you visit within the summer months), a range of fascinating museums, theatres, lush gardens, and a beautiful cliff railway. Additionally, there’s a collection of small coves waiting to be explored.

Top Tip: I highly recommend visiting the Oddicombe Beach viewpoint as it’s stunning.

*This article is sponsored by Unique Hideaways. All opinions are my own.

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Tourist Information Centre Will Not Reopen this Season

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Totnes Pulse

C E A S E F I R E – N O W !

Totnes Tourist Information Centre is closed for now

Totnes Town Councillors have made the difficult decision not to reopen the town’s in-person Tourist Information Centre (TIC).

Visitor information will continue to be delivered online at www.visittotnes.co.uk , via the new signs and maps dotted throughout the town. A printed town map will also be available from a number of key locations in the town. Local printed information, for example bus timetables, will continue to be available from other locations in Totnes, including the Town Council office.

High Overheads

The Mayor of Totnes Town Council Emily 'Mop' Price

Cllr Emily Price, Mayor of Totnes, said: “ With costs rising and our council’s determination to keep Council Tax increases as low as possible for our community, we’ve had to prioritise what we do. In our Community Conversation survey, which was held in summer 2023 to identify the priorities for residents and businesses, our tourist information centre scored low compared to things like supporting community groups and maintaining the town. We’ve also looked at the number of people who use the in-person service, which has dropped significantly since the Covid pandemic. As a result, we’ve opted not to recruit a new Seasonal Tourist Information Assistant this year and we won’t be opening the in-person Tourist Information Centre.”

Still committed

She continued: “I would like to reassure our businesses that we remain committed to supporting them by actively promoting tourism and encouraging visitors to spend as long as possible in our town via our alternative Visit Totnes channels. And I’d like to reassure any local people who used the Tourist Information Centre to get a copy of a printed bus timetable that these will still be available online from Devon County Council and in print (while stocks last!) from other locations in the town including the Council Offices at Rampart’s Walk, which is open Monday-Friday 10am-4pm.”

The TIC, which was previously located in the Market Square, received 2,279 in-person enquiries in 2023. The number of pages viewed on www.visittotnes.co.uk in 2023 was over 330,000. Alongside other staffing reductions in non-statutory areas, it is estimated that the closure will help to save the Town Council around £95,000 a year.

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  1. Totnes Information

    Keep informed with all the latest news from our local shops, accommodation, attractions and eateries by following us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @visittotnes. Official Totnes information website packed with all you need to know about Totnes events, accommodation and things to do.

  2. Totnes Information Point

    Opening times. Open Monday-Friday 10 am - 3 pm. Like or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for news and updates - @visittotnes. From end September - April you can visit the Information Points in the Royal Seven Stars Hotel on Fore Street or Totnes Bookshop on High Street. Visit Website.

  3. Visiting Totnes

    You can find out all you need to know on accommodation, food, attractions and things to do during your visit to Totnes. With a reputation for being friendly, quirky and having a real Bohemian atmosphere, Totnes in South Devon is a wonderfully charming town to spend your time. With regular markets, including one where every one is in period dress, a castle to explore and plenty of lovely walks ...

  4. Totnes

    Tourist Information Centre. Dating back to 907 AD, Totnes is a fascinating historical town which combines stunning countryside with independent shopping, local food & drink and interesting attractions. Located in the heart of South Devon on the banks of the River Dart, this unique and charming town has an international reputation for its lively ...

  5. Visit Totnes

    Our town map, including a 1-hour town trail can be downloaded here. You can also pick up a paper copy of the map at various locations in the town including The Guildhall (open Monday-Friday 11am-3pm from April to October) and in the entrance to St Mary's Church. Follow @visittotnes on Facebook and Instagram to stay updated. Call: 01803 269190.

  6. Things to do in Totnes

    Totnes Guildhall *Totnes Guildhall is currently closed for winter and will reopen again for the season on 2 April 2024* Totnes Guildhall was built in 1553 on the ruins of the medieval priory, founded in 1088. It has been the heart of the town's administrative, legal and ceremonial life for centuries, serving as court, prison and meeting ...

  7. Totnes (Devon) Tourist Information Guide

    Tourist Information Centre: The Town Mill, Coronation Road, Totnes, Devon. TQ9 5DF - Tel: 01803 863168: Content by Steve B. ... Location: 70 Fore St, Totnes, Devon, TQ9 5RU - Tel: 01803 863821 Website Facilities: shop. Map of Totnes. South West England. Towns and Villages in Devon.

  8. Top Attractions

    Explore the amazing things to do in Totnes and make memories to last a lifetime, with our guide to must-see attractions in and around the town. See & Do. Top Attractions ... Starts 10.30a.m outside Visit Totnes Office, Market Square. £8 per person, £4 under 16's. Call or text for further information. Private group tours are available any ...

  9. App for Devon

    Totnes Tourist Information Centre. Tweet. Opening Times . Period Open; Monday - Saturday: 10.00am - 4.00pm: Bank Holidays: 10.00am - 2.00pm . Contact Details. The Town Mill Coronation Road Totnes TQ9 5DF Telephone: 01803 863168 Email: enquire@totnesinformation ...

  10. Everything you need to know about visiting Totnes

    Proudly offbeat and quirky, full of history and a shopper's paradise to boot, Totnes is one of the county's must-visit towns, especially in the run up to the festive season. Markets are a big deal in Totnes and they really go to town in the run-up to Christmas. Festive markets and late-night shopping events take place throughout December, with ...

  11. An insider's guide to Totnes

    An insider's guide to Totnes. By Visit Totnes on Jun. 28, 2022. Located halfway between Dartmoor and the sea is Totnes, a real gem in South Devon's crown. Totnes is a thriving and quirky town with a unique feel and a friendly atmosphere, if you're new to the region, here is your guide to all the things to see and do while in the town.

  12. 18 top things to do in Totnes, South Devon (2024 guide)

    Finally, visit the Babbage Room to learn about Charles Babbage, an inventor who is thought to be the father of computing, who studied in Totnes. 3. Totnes Fashion & Textile Museum. The Totnes Fashion & Textile Museum is another place to visit in Totnes on a rainy day - or anytime!

  13. Totnes, Devon

    Jasmine Cottage, Totnes - 3 miles. Totnes, Devon. Sleeps: 6. Stay from: £499.00 - 2811.00. More self catering near Totnes. Information on the historic Devon town of Totnes, with its castle, Guildhall, Tudor buildings and legendary Brutus Stone. History, beautiful photos, accommodation and visiting information.

  14. Visit Totnes

    Visit Totnes, Totnes. 4,556 likes · 153 talking about this · 1 was here. Visit Totnes, a unique, historic market town located on the beautiful River Dart in Devon

  15. What to do in Totnes, South Devon's quirkiest corner

    Historic Totnes may lay claim to being the second-oldest borough in England — with a Norman castle, Tudor-era covered walkway and Grade I-listed church to testify — but its feet stand firmly ...

  16. Successful Summer for the Tourist Information Centre

    The Visit Totnes Tourist Information Centre in the Market Square has now closed for winter after a. busy summer season. Open from April to the end of October, the team responded to nearly 2,900. enquiries for information on things to do in Totnes, including places to stay or eat, local walks, boat. trips and family activities.

  17. What to do in Totnes, South Devon's quirkiest corner

    What to do in Totnes, South Devon's quirkiest corner. Decamp to the South Devon town for quirky counterculture, organic pubs and outdoor adventures on the edge of Dartmoor. Totnes has been shaped by two charitable estates that have, over the past 100 years, helped to instil the bohemian reputation that the town enjoys today. Photograph by ...

  18. Totnes

    Totnes (/ ˈ t ɒ t n ɪ s / TOT-niss or / t ɒ t ˈ n ɛ s / tot-NESS) is a market town and civil parish at the head of the estuary of the River Dart in Devon, England, within the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.It is about 5 miles (8.0 km) west of Paignton, about 7 miles (11 km) west-southwest of Torquay and about 20 miles (32 km) east-northeast of Plymouth.

  19. 10 Best Things to do in Totnes, Devon • Adventures of Alice

    The 10 Best Things to Do in Totnes. This gorgeous part of Southern England was one of the most interesting towns we explored in Devon. Here are the 10 best things to do in Totnes. 1. Explore Totnes Castle. Perched on top of a hill, this English Heritage site offers a fascinating glimpse of Totnes's history while providing stunning views over ...

  20. Tourist Information Centre Will Not Reopen this Season

    21st March 2024 The Totnes Pulse. Totnes Town Councillors have made the difficult decision not to reopen the town's in-person Tourist Information Centre (TIC). Visitor information will continue to be delivered online at www.visittotnes.co.uk, via the new signs and maps dotted throughout the town. A printed town map will also be available from ...

  21. Where to Stay

    Enjoying a good nights rest is an important part of your holiday. Get started here. Totnes and the surrounding area boasts all types of accommodation to please a range of tastes and budgets. Whether you're looking for a classy hotel, a friendly guesthouse, a cosy cottage or the warm welcome of a farm, you're sure to find something to suit ...

  22. Ashburton Tourist Information Centre

    Ashburton Tourist Information Centre. Town Hall, North Street, Ashburton, Devon, TQ13 7QQ. Visit Website. Send Email. View Phone Number. Ashburton Tourist Information Centre staff will be delighted to help you make the most of your time in our area providing helpful, friendly and professional advice. Local and UK-wide accommodation bookings.

  23. What's On Archive

    Totnes Market The Market Square has been home to the bustling weekly markets for hundreds of years, and today you can still stumble across this gem of a shopping experience every Friday and Saturday 9-4pm. There's also a Sunday Food and Craft Market, held in the Market Square every third Sunday of the month from 10am to 3pm.Meet the friendly traders, soak up the colourful sights and discover a ...